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for the art lovers. who is your favorite artist?

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posted on Dec, 10 2016 @ 01:23 AM
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I love Jan Vermeer but this admiration is now tainted with doubt ever since watching Tim's Vermeer. Lead by Tim Jenison, a billionaire entrepreneur, Philip Steadman who wrote Vermeer's Camera and artist David Hockney they built a case that Vermeer used a camera obscura to paint.


Hieronymus Bosch, which was mentioned by Natas0114 and Anaana, El Greco, JMW Turner and Henri Rousseau also comes to mind.
View of Toledo circa 1600
Snow Storm- Steam-Boat off a Harbour's Mouth circa 1842
Myself: Portrait Landscape circa 1890
edit on 09 11 2015 by MaxTamesSiva because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 02:43 AM
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a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

Toledo circa April 2016...





I love the Rousseau painting of Toledo, he really captures it's higgle-de-piggledness. El Greco is very big, as I am sure you know, in Toledo, but less my thing. The most stunning art, and I don't know who or why it was created, I found in the cathedral, I think it is technically monumental art, but still, it got me where it counts...








posted on Dec, 11 2016 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: Anaana
Wish I could visit Toledo before I die... or before I kill myself (just kidding), pardon the degenerate humor... speaking of degenerates, I can very much relate to the German Expressionists:
I particularly like Max Beckmann's triptychs and In Family Picture (1920)

Is it El Transparente? It was made by the architect and sculptor Narciso Tomé, the fresco was probably painted by one of his sons.



posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 04:09 AM
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originally posted by: MaxTamesSiva
Is it El Transparente? It was made by the architect and sculptor Narciso Tomé, the fresco was probably painted by one of his sons.



Yes! That's the one.





I can't deny, it is definately worth a visit...or two. We stayed in Madrid but took the train over twice, one day was not enough, as compact as it may be, there is a lot to explore.

A little incentive for you, a few more of the cathedral...







And an El Greco (The Disrobing of Christ)...



...as well as Caravaggio's rather youthful John the Baptist...



And that is just the cathedral.




posted on Dec, 13 2016 @ 07:42 AM
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a reply to: Anaana
Wow!



posted on Dec, 17 2016 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: MaxTamesSiva

I found this one that shows the bridge in Rousseau's painting...but he's got a whole fish-eye-perspective-thingy going on...



...and this one is looking down from the walls, from the other direction down at the bridge, and you can see the castle that's on the left in his work.



Looking back and forth between the photos and Rousseau, he's painted an impossible perspective and yet, it is totally Toledo. Terribly clever.

Thanks



posted on May, 14 2017 @ 05:24 AM
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I have a new favorite- Jakuchu, thought I'd share this with all of you. He said that:

"My paintings will be understood 1,000 years from now."


Japanese painter Ito Jakuchu (1716-1800) left these mysterious words along with his many paintings. These prophetic words are coming true with recent finds using the latest technology to better understand the artists creative process, and his singular style in composition and design. Observe in pristine images the remarkably fine lines of Jakuchu (0.1mm!), and find out the messages hidden in the paintings of the man with the hand of god...
Ito Jakuchu

Here's the link to an NHK documentary Jakuchu: The Divine Colors
edit on 09 11 2015 by MaxTamesSiva because: (no reason given)



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