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Cosmic Rays, especially X-Rays, The Solar System is Receiving Have been Increasing

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posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 02:04 AM
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Can we get back to discussing the mysterious source, if it exists, if so what could it be?




posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 02:13 AM
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originally posted by: GoShredAK
Can we get back to discussing the mysterious source, if it exists, if so what could it be?


Electromagnetic Space Trolls, crawling from a subatomic K-hole? .. . . . . I have no idea. Srry



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 02:15 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

I'm not a scientist but, if the science of radiology or
gamma rays, radiation, astronomy are as arguable as all
this? Can't see much point in being one.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 02:32 AM
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a reply to: 191stMIDET
Hey, that's a start


Except somehow I think fractals are involved as well.....



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 03:28 AM
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a reply to: alphabetaone

Actually you are very wrong.

First of all, you should read the links and excerpts given first. Although it is true that the Earth's magnetic field is weakening, that is not the main reason for this increase in energy the entire solar system is receiving.

Second of all, you can also see the solar maximums on the graph.

Let me show you.



Those yellow circles are solar maximum events. (it's a general idea)

Did you notice something else about them? Even at solar Maximum the amount of x-rays we are receiving it's been increasing.


edit on 2-12-2016 by ElectricUniverse because: correct comment.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 03:33 AM
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originally posted by: GoShredAK


I was under the impression that according to the OP, some of these rays are coming from a source separate from the sun.


You are right, the problem is alphabetaone didn't read the links given.

3/4 of the X-rays we are receiving are coming from this mysterious source. The other 1/4 come from both the Sun and the Local Bubble.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

As stated by others, cosmic ray intensity is strongly correlated with solar activity (11 years cycles). If cosmic rays had an effect on global temperature it would be clearly visible.

The amount of radiation required to increase temperature directly would be deadly. There is the idea that the primary effect would be not heating but cloud formation, means with increasing radiation the amount of clouds would increase, reducing global temperature. But this is not observed either.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 03:51 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

The graphs showing cosmic rays have a slight correlation to the sunspot cycle graph...




More solar activity, less cosmic rays. Less solar activity, more cosmic rays.

With such a quiet sun the last few years, it's no surprise more cosmic rays are getting in.


It's a factor worth considering.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 09:13 AM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

The only logical survival mentality to have with your theory, is that habitat needs to be protected at all costs for food and environmental stability.

If cosmic rays are adding to warming or out rightly creating it even, the damage human expansion and resource depletion vs population growth is even worse.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 09:35 AM
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a reply to: alphabetaone

If you look at the OP's previous threads and posts you will find a poster who believes that human activity has a negligible effect on this planet's climate. This thread based on a misunderstanding of solar cycles and the role that plays on cosmic rays we observe, is an attempt to blame man made climate change on something else, in my humble opinion.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 09:36 AM
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originally posted by: Indigent
a reply to: alphabetaone

Read what you said and think if it makes any sence, really man. Is anything of what you are saying addressing my question, does x rays heat? I don't need to find out what x rays are, I know they are high energy photons, with really tiny wavelength.

Do you think electrons are traveling through space and generating the radiation locally? Really really think, comprehend what you say, realize that the formation of the x ray has no relation what so ever with my question.


I did answer your question, in my original post back to you where I said


maybe 1-3% of the resulting energy are x-rays, the rest of the energy is released as heat, so depending on the stream, in theory it could melt ice.


Unless your questions wasn't: So real honest question, does x ray melt ice?

I thought that it was though.
edit on 2-12-2016 by alphabetaone because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 09:55 AM
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originally posted by: ElectricUniverse
a reply to: alphabetaone

Actually you are very wrong.

First of all, you should read the links and excerpts given first.


I have, long before you posted it here.



Although it is true that the Earth's magnetic field is weakening, that is not the main reason for this increase in energy the entire solar system is receiving.


I think YOU need to read though, I said nothing of Earth's magnetic field, I said a whole lot though, about the Sun's magnetic field and it's decrease during solar minimums.





Second of all, you can also see the solar maximums on the graph.

Let me show you.



Those yellow circles are solar maximum events. (it's a general idea)

Did you notice something else about them? Even at solar Maximum the amount of x-rays we are receiving it's been increasing.



Now allow me to show you, from spaceweather's own voice



Why are cosmic rays intensifying? The main reason is the sun. Solar storm clouds such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) sweep aside cosmic rays when they pass by Earth. During Solar Maximum, CMEs are abundant and cosmic rays are held at bay. Now, however, the solar cycle is swinging toward Solar Minimum, allowing cosmic rays to return. Another reason could be the weakening of Earth's magnetic field, which helps protect us from deep-space radiation.


Found right on their Home Page

They are measuring with a balloon, from California, the amount of Cosmic Radiation (as displayed in your charts) from Earth with sea level as it's baseline - this is not a galactic chart of Cosmic Radiation.

What I will say is that, as many ancient cultures have also known, and frankly we should too, is that the galaxy is constantly in motion - and if you want to get technical with the universe constantly expanding - as is the universe. So of course it can be assumed that cosmic radiation will not remain stagnant.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 10:27 AM
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originally posted by: jrod
a reply to: alphabetaone

If you look at the OP's previous threads and posts you will find a poster who believes that human activity has a negligible effect on this planet's climate. This thread based on a misunderstanding of solar cycles and the role that plays on cosmic rays we observe, is an attempt to blame man made climate change on something else, in my humble opinion.


Well, if you look at my posts based upon weather and paleoclimatology, I think you will find that I too believe, as the OP, that Human activity has a more negligible effect than the press would have us believe. A bit off-topic for this conversation, but one of the largest reasons is that water vapor was originally categorized as just that, vapor instead of a gas...so early climate models didn't account for it properly.

But without a doubt, our Sun is the largest factor in our climate.

Have you ever been troubleshooting a cars electrical problem where you bring out all the tools, oscilloscope, computers, thermal imaging scopes, fluke meters just to find that you didn't check all the fuses? I think that's what we're doing with the climate. Were veering off into too many directions to find answers where occams razor should be in full-swing.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 11:01 AM
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I hate to say this, but x-rays are not only NOT streams of electrons, they're not even cosmic rays.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 11:13 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam
I hate to say this, but x-rays are not only NOT streams of electrons, they're not even cosmic rays.



Nor do they really come into the atmosphere from space. Which is why the telescopes are in space. Could a charged particle from x ray bombardment cause atmospheric heating.....its possible.

I would say it's just more of a reason to preserve the habitat left. People need to know we can breed and progress ourselves out of food and resources. Regardless of who or what is causing climate change. If it's changing we need to adjust and prepare not poison the well.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 11:23 AM
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The OP states our entire solar system is receiving more cosmic rays not just earth so whether or not we are experiencing a magnetic shift would be irrelevant as would anything else earth based surely?

Could the cosmic rays not be from a huge variety of sources - a supernova, red giant, white dwarf or some other cosmic event that happened either locally (fairly recently in astronomical terms) or could have happened far out and the light could have been here before the earth or even our sun were formed and these rays are only arriving now.

Just thinking out loud



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: johnb

Most cosmic waves come from outside the solar system so this is of coarse the case.

Only some high energy protons come from the sun as cosmic waves. By comparison most cosmic waves are from astronomic processes we don't have, thankfully so, in our close relative proximity.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 11:53 AM
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Man, people are getting really heated here. Let me be the first to fling the electronic 💩



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 01:06 PM
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a reply to: alphabetaone


Well, x-rays are nothing more thana directed stream of electrons. Whenever that stream reaches its target, maybe 1-3% of the resulting energy are x-rays, the rest of the energy is released as heat, so depending on the stream, in theory it could melt ice.

Er, no.

Electrons are particles (although they may act as waves when in motion), while x-rays, cosmic rays, light, radio waves, are all electromagnetic waves. The only difference is in energy, which is a function of frequency (reciprocal function of wavelength). Just because we use electron bombardment to produce electromagnetic wave phenomenon, it does not follow that electromagnetic waves are electrons. That's like saying we use drums to make sound waves, so sound waves are streams of drums.

If you took time to read the linked articles, you wold have seen this:

DXL’s data revealed that about forty percent of most observed X-rays come from the solar wind. But in higher energy ranges, some X-rays are still unexplained. DXL’s observations show that less than a quarter of the X-ray emission at higher energy levels comes from the solar wind, and the Local Hot Bubble isn’t a good explanation either.

“The temperature of the Local Hot Bubble is not high enough to produce X-rays in this energy range,” said Uprety. “So we’re left with an open question on the source of these X-rays.”
Source: www.astrowatch.net...

Also, if you will research Cosmic Rays, you will soon discover that some Cosmic Rays have far too much energy to be produced by a star as small as our sun. Some have too much energy to be produced by supernovae. NASA's EUSO project is presently investigating these high-energy Cosmic Rays to try and determine an origin.

One of the lead physicists on the project recently described them this way: "a single photon having the energy of a baseball pitcher's fast ball." Luckily for us these are rare.

 

To the OP:

I am not sure these increasing waves are sufficient to fully explain the reports of Global Warming, but then again I am not fully convinced of the accuracy of the reports. Increasing high-energy waves from outside the Solar System could easily explain the reported increases on other solar planets, however, so I am keeping an open mind.

Great find, S&F!

TheRedneck



edit on 12/2/2016 by TheRedneck because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 01:24 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck

Er, no.



Er, yes.

As it takes accelerated electrons to produce the effect of x-ray (magnetic waves are a effect)



That's like saying we use drums to make sound waves, so sound waves are streams of drums.


No, it's like saying constantly beating the same drum produces the same wave over and over.



edit on 2-12-2016 by alphabetaone because: clarity



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