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More than 450 volcanoes in Ring of Fire

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posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 03:54 AM
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a reply to: loam

I like the thinking behind that. An impact from space that skims the Earth would surely leave a horseshoe impression and the ring of fire is a horseshoe shape.




posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 03:55 AM
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a reply to: loam

I like your question.....

Does the shoe fit ?



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 04:27 AM
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originally posted by: loam
So here's a question...

Since the theory of the moon is that a great collision occurred with the earth, would the ring of fire, and therefore the pacific basin, be the logical impact site?

Just askin'


I wonder if they could test the earths crust inside the ring of fire and compare it to the earths crust outside of the ring to test this idea.

Or would it be better to test the crust from inside the ring of fire with earth of the moon?

Is the amount of material that would have had to be removed to make the ring of fire equal to the mass of the moon? I doubt it, unless it is hollow.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 04:41 AM
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a reply to: loam

Good Question loam!

One I will have to answer tomorrow, I'm going to Zzzz





posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 07:44 AM
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originally posted by: JesusXst

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: JesusXst

I live on the ring of fire (Auckland is practically made of calderras) and there does seem to be a bit of a ramp up in activity.

Last week there were two new geysers that fired up from Lake Rotorua and the island in the middle of Lake Taupo (Taupo is a supervolcano) has started 'lifting' with increasing speed (indicating a ramp up in subterranean pressure).

Also, we've had a few large quakes in the last two weeks which seems to have lubricated the process, triggering smaller quakes closetr to the volcanos.


I remember hearing about it yeah, that's kinda scary eh. There's been a lot of volcanic activity around the planet as of late. It's hard to know what's going on with it.


Yeah, the Auckland Volcanic Field alone has has 52 volcanoes which have erupted within the last 250,000 years.

The second most liveable city in the world is exciting, too!



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 08:13 AM
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originally posted by: loam
So here's a question...

Since the theory of the moon is that a great collision occurred with the earth, would the ring of fire, and therefore the pacific basin, be the logical impact site?

Just askin'


The proposed impact of Theia on the Earth, while splashing out the mass that became the Moon, would also have had enough energy to liquify the rest of the Earth (as well as the Moon).

This is why both Moon and Earth are close to spherical, because they were once moltern droplets in space. Also, the splash that made the Moon was probably not in a single drop, but many that 'glooped'* together while still moltern.

As it is, the Moon has no internal heat source due to its smaller mass and so is likely solid all the way through.

The Earth, however, has a largely liquid interior kept hot through extreme compression, latent heat as the solid core slowly expands and changes from liquid to solid, leftover heat from the formation of the Earth but also mostly from radioactive processes where heavy actinides have pooled.

You could imagine the Earth as having a consistency a bit more viscous than very thick custard, and we are walking around on the skin on top thinking it's solid, just because that's the only part we usually see.

So, getting back to answering the post, the Ring of Fire is likely a later artefact of plate tectonics (convection and cooling related), not necessarily related to the Theia impact.

edit on 2/12/2016 by chr0naut because: *Note: 'glooped' is a highly technical scientific term.




posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 08:20 AM
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originally posted by: bilbous
a reply to: loam

I like the thinking behind that. An impact from space that skims the Earth would surely leave a horseshoe impression and the ring of fire is a horseshoe shape.




Theia's impact would have to have been straight-on, not skimming.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 08:20 AM
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It is a lot of volcanoes but then without volcanic activity we have no life on Earth. Volcanoes are a sign our core is still functioning properly.

There is also a strong belief that there are actually far more volcanoes than that within the ring of fire but the majority are sub oceanic.



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 08:41 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: JesusXst

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: JesusXst

I live on the ring of fire (Auckland is practically made of calderras) and there does seem to be a bit of a ramp up in activity.

Last week there were two new geysers that fired up from Lake Rotorua and the island in the middle of Lake Taupo (Taupo is a supervolcano) has started 'lifting' with increasing speed (indicating a ramp up in subterranean pressure).

Also, we've had a few large quakes in the last two weeks which seems to have lubricated the process, triggering smaller quakes closetr to the volcanos.


I remember hearing about it yeah, that's kinda scary eh. There's been a lot of volcanic activity around the planet as of late. It's hard to know what's going on with it.


Yeah, the Auckland Volcanic Field alone has has 52 volcanoes which have erupted within the last 250,000 years.

The second most liveable city in the world is exciting, too!



Did you mean to say which [have] or [haven't] erupted in the past 250,000 years?? That would be one hell of a blow.

Wow that I did not know about!



posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 08:46 PM
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a reply to: scubagravy

I think we'd all be ground pounded at that point!




posted on Dec, 2 2016 @ 10:44 PM
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originally posted by: loam
So here's a question...

Since the theory of the moon is that a great collision occurred with the earth, would the ring of fire, and therefore the pacific basin, be the logical impact site?

Just askin'


loam, here's some info on it for you. Whether it would be a true impact site is still debatable.

15 signs that the Ring of Fire is waking up as we head into 2013


While most of the world has been focused on other things, the Ring of Fire has been quietly waking up. Over the past couple of months, there has been a steady string of noteworthy volcanic eruptions and earthquakes that have occurred along the perimeter of the Pacific Ocean. But because none of them have happened near a highly populated area, we really haven’t heard much about them in the news.

But if activity along the Ring of Fire continues to increase, it is inevitable that a major event will happen near a major city at some point. When that happens, the entire world will be focused on the Ring of Fire once again. Approximately 90 percent of all earthquakes and approximately 75 percent of all volcanic eruptions occur along the Ring of Fire. The entire west coast of the United States sits along the Ring of Fire and a massive network of faults runs underneath California, Oregon and Washington.

Fortunately, the west coast has not experienced any devastating seismic events in recent years, but scientists assure us that will change at some point. So it is important to sit up and take notice when there are reports of increasing activity.


watchers.news...


Nearly all of the worst earthquakes in modern history have occurred along the Ring of Fire. When the Ring of Fire is very active, it is a very big deal. That is why so many people are alarmed that the Ring of Fire seems to be entering a period of increased activity.

edit on 2-12-2016 by JesusXst because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2016 @ 02:56 AM
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originally posted by: JesusXst

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: JesusXst

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: JesusXst

I live on the ring of fire (Auckland is practically made of calderras) and there does seem to be a bit of a ramp up in activity.

Last week there were two new geysers that fired up from Lake Rotorua and the island in the middle of Lake Taupo (Taupo is a supervolcano) has started 'lifting' with increasing speed (indicating a ramp up in subterranean pressure).

Also, we've had a few large quakes in the last two weeks which seems to have lubricated the process, triggering smaller quakes closetr to the volcanos.


I remember hearing about it yeah, that's kinda scary eh. There's been a lot of volcanic activity around the planet as of late. It's hard to know what's going on with it.


Yeah, the Auckland Volcanic Field alone has has 52 volcanoes which have erupted within the last 250,000 years.

The second most liveable city in the world is exciting, too!



Did you mean to say which [have] or [haven't] erupted in the past 250,000 years?? That would be one hell of a blow.

Wow that I did not know about!


They HAVE all erupted some time in the last 250,000 years (but not at the same time).

Most of the Auckland ones the slower erupting (monogenetic) types, not the massive explosion (phreatomagmatic) types. The Auckland field, however, is still active.

Although we don't know exactly where they will pop up, we can trace the geological weaknesses and track the supposed movement of volcanic activity beneath the city. There are quite detailed maps of where the active points may be likely to erupt next. They tend to follow fault lines and other crustal weak points.

The real major problem, to my way of thinking is the Taupo supervolcano. It is showing signs of increasing activity and were it to erupt explosively, will produce a lahar as it expels the lake (59 cubic kilometers of water), not to mention the pure eruptive power.

The biggest eruption of Taupo was about 340,000 years ago and it ejected about 2,000 cubic kilometers of magma (nope that isn't a mistype). It was the fifth largest volcanic eruption that we know of in all of the Earth's history. Taupo itself is not a mountain because the explosive force of the eruptions has distibuted the ejecta over vast distances.

The eruption of Taupo in AD 232 was the most violent eruption on Earth in the last 5,000 years.

Taupo has erupted periodically with major ones averaging approximately every 1,000 years. The last major eruption was in 260AD, 1,750 years ago, so we are overdue.

I live only @ 260km away from Taupo, so if it goes in my lifetime, so do I.


edit on 3/12/2016 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)




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