It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Help ATS via PayPal:
learn more

Work for Your Education

page: 1
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 06:29 PM
link   
I was reading through Loam's thread about the possibility and eventuality of a student loan bubble. www.abovetopsecret.com...

Lots of back and forth and to me neither side is wrong. The gist is that at some point the outstanding loans will need to be paid back. One way or another. In this thread I would like to propose my long standing idea on the matter. I've greatly considered this a valid option and have gone as far as contacting a few non-profit organizations and may make some headway.

Here is the premise. Temporary work. You make wages based upon experience and are not bound to any place that you work for. Part of these wages, possibly tax exempt go to a school fund. Similar to a 401k or Roth IRA. By the time you are in your mid twenties you are ready to pay for school and can dedicate as much time as you have earned toward this endeavor.

My reasoning behind this is rather simple. In a persons teens to early twenties, generally speaking, they will never have more energy and use of real hands on work. Minds are working and can be molded. Skills can be learned and used. Risks don't carry the same weight they do as you age. Expenses are minimal.

Now some kids/young adults have it all figured out. They've done the research, they have the motivation and passion and know what they want. I don't think that scenario applies to most however. By exposing folks to as many different fields of work and study as possible in their prime years and at the same time, giving them a shot at earning money and they ability to actually INVEST in their own future would pay dividends on multiple fronts.


Please, pick this argument apart. Scrutinize it. In my mind this makes sense. This is how you feed minds and muscle and responsibility.




posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 06:40 PM
link   
a reply to: JinMI




Temporary work. You make wages based upon experience and are not bound to any place that you work for. Part of these wages, possibly tax exempt go to a school fund. Similar to a 401k or Roth IRA. By the time you are in your mid twenties you are ready to pay for school and can dedicate as much time as you have earned toward this endeavor.


I'm not sure I fully understand. At what age are people to start working? Who decides what the experience is worth?



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 06:43 PM
link   
USCG Academy:

4 year college, Bach degree, guaranteed fair paying job for 5 years, 100 ton masters license (world recognized ship driver license). Security clearance, full health care paid.

Then you can stay in or leave. No college loans to repay. Blistering resume' to get you any of your choice job if you choose to leave.
edit on 30-11-2016 by tkwasny because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 06:45 PM
link   
a reply to: eluryh22

Sorry if my thread is unclear. I'm not the best at making them.

State laws would apply here. In Michigan the age is 14 with a work permit. The wage is commensurate upon experience.

The only difference here would be in deductions from paychecks. Taking a percentage (as of this moment unknown) and putting it in an investment account similar to how retirement accounts are used. When a certain amount is met, they can choose to enroll in school and dedicate towards it knowing they have it paid for.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 06:47 PM
link   
a reply to: tkwasny

US military is never a bad option either. Not discounting that at all. You could say it's a little bit more streamlined even!

In the end however, whatever your MoS is what your experience will be and you get to roll the dice on if that's how you want to spend your years making a living.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:07 PM
link   
a reply to: JinMI

It's not a terrible idea. I do have some concerns though.

It's been a lifetime since I had my teenage working papers but if memory serves me correctly (and unless things have changed) there were strict limits in the amount of hours that could be worked. That, combined with the wages paid, may not equate to all that much by the time a kid graduates high school.

I really like the investment aspect of it. I REALLY like it. However, I do see a problem with it. Since we are talking about not-that-much in funds being invested over a relatively short period of time, the temptation may be to go for more aggressive investments. These investments tend to be risky and it's not impossible to see a scenario where a kid works for X-years and then the summer before college starts.... SOMETHING happens and he/she loses almost everything.

Again, overall I like the abstract of where you are coming from and I'm not trying to pick it apart. Just trying to help work through it.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:13 PM
link   
a reply to: eluryh22

Your concern is valid but the point I'm trying to make is to push the traditional age of college ahead. Now I don't know about you but when I was 17-24 I certainly didn't have the life experience nor work experience to know what I wanted to do. What field I wanted to work in etc.

That's why the temporary placement aspect. Think of an all encompassing temporary employee placement agency that covers everything from farms to doctors offices/hospitals to law firms to research facilities. By giving people an option to work in some manner within these places they can put together a stronger connection with what they would like to do.

By actually getting out there and seeing what is available, and putting time/money away for school, folks will be better educated to make the correct choices.

Also, I want this to be picked apart! I want the many minds here at ATS to find the faults in this idea.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:15 PM
link   
a reply to: JinMI

I don't know man, sometimes I think it'd be better to leave our current model for education in the dust. Who is it really helping?

Fixing the financial aspect is like fixing only the foundation of an otherwise completely condemned house
edit on 30-11-2016 by MiddleInitial because: More words!



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:17 PM
link   
a reply to: MiddleInitial

Colleges and student load providers..ie the federal gov't .

I think my idea here does leave the traditional model in the dust, would you not?

I also think my idea covers the capitalistic nature of the US at the same time catering to the future of its citizens. It also does not leave behind anyone who is not willing to work for it. The only hiccup, as EluryH pointed out is the financial security of the money being saved/invested.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:17 PM
link   
That plan would totally work, OP.

Unfortunately, the elite's plan is to start everybody off in the workforce deeply in debt so they have themselves a nation of wage-slaves. They like things just the way they are.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:19 PM
link   
a reply to: Farlander

Elites plan be damned! If we as a people are going to continue to be, we need to take a hard look at the future and what it may entail. By taking education and putting it in our own hands so to speak we can mold it.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:21 PM
link   
a reply to: JinMI

You've got moxie, kid. If you start the revolution, I'll back you up all the way!



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:25 PM
link   
a reply to: JinMI




the point I'm trying to make is to push the traditional age of college


WHY DIDN'T YOU SAY SO!?!?!?!?!

I have been preaching this for YEARS!!!!

I think the graduate-high-school-go-straight-to-college thing has (almost) no place in our society. I will admit that some young people know from very early on what it is they want to be. A doctor. A pilot. A veterinarian. Most people, it is my contention, do not.

I think the model should be:

- Graduate high school

- Take an entry level, clerical position for a company in an industry that you THINK you might like.

- If you don't like the first one, try another industry, and another until you find the one that you have a REAL reason to believe is a good match for you.

- THEN continue working while attending college (part time) in that field. You will find that you are utterly immersed in this field/industry. It will make for a better student and a better employee and ultimately better opportunities.

Just my opinion anyway.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:30 PM
link   
a reply to: eluryh22

Excellent points!

I would like to note however that instead of taking any job you can to see if you like it, instead you can choose. I haven't worked for a temp service in quite awhile but from what I remember is the place you based upon openings. Having all available employment options made for these young adults cuts out on some of the gamble.

Yes, our thoughts are very similar on the matter.

I can't help but wonder that all this debt placed upon easily controlled post high school students isn't by design.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:32 PM
link   
a reply to: eluryh22

I have been working sine I was 3 feet tall young age in landscaping. My folks worked me real hard. Never got paid for it. But I learned at a young age there will be days you work for free....but one day money will come. Today I run my own business after running a student debt loan over $50,000 whilst achieving my accounting degree. Paid the the loan off working 7 days a week for 3 years ontop of business and personal expenses. Mind you the government was threatening to go after anyone's driver's license who had a loan which motivated me to work my 70-90 hrs A WEEK...SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

NO EXCUSES WHY NO ONE CAN'T PAY OFF A LOAN...I DID WITH MY OWN TWO HANDS.

That said, I also sacrificed a lot...not much free time, no seeing friends, no dating (no money to afford dates or going out)...and no cable tv!



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:47 PM
link   
a reply to: JinMI

Yes, of course the young person can choose. Hypothetically, lets say they are thinking about studying law. Take an entry level position in a law firm. No, you won't be in the courtroom but you will get a "feel" for what the industry might be like. You will have access and form some relationships with lawyers and will see a lot of the behind the scenes stuff.

I had NO IDEA what I was going to do with my life when I graduated high school. I worked all sorts of jobs ranging from service industry (supermarket cashier, cook in a Chinese kitchen, etc) to office jobs (at title insurance companies and front office of a uniform manufacturing company). One day I ended up as a file clerk (fancy name for photocopy-boy) in a mid-sized construction company. Within weeks of dropping off supplies at sites and listening in on meetings.... I knew this was something I wanted to be part of. Tons and tons and tons of time and long hours and covering the worst shifts in the world and taking work home from me to get ahead.... and it turned into a wonderful career.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:48 PM
link   
a reply to: Skywatcher2011

I can not express how fond I am of stories like yours. I think it would do wonders to the general psyche if people heard more about things like this than tales of "woe is me."



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:51 PM
link   
a reply to: Skywatcher2011

The question is, would you do it the same way again if there was a better and slightly easier way. By no means easy but easier than the route you took?



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:53 PM
link   
a reply to: eluryh22

I got my first job at 10. I worked in a bike shop around the corner for parts. Did many many things over the years. Today I'm a CNC machinist. It took me years to get here but I took the long way. Given the opportunity I would have went into the Air Force and worked in computer sciences. So many wrong turns simply because I lacked the education and experience to make the right ones. I don't think that should be the way we operate.

It only benefits loan holders and college establishments.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 07:55 PM
link   
a reply to: eluryh22

I didn't have an easy childhood...no sir. And much like your vibrations on the keyboard tell me in order to be a success you have to work for it.

Even though I have a nice king size bed...I still sleep on my couch as a daily reminder where I came from and where I want to be....eventually sleep in my bed. But those are the growing pains.




top topics



 
4
<<   2 >>

log in

join