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Water “freezes” at 105 C inside of carbon nanotubes

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posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 04:38 PM
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This OP made me think of something, under my "glazed over' eyes... a question. Hope it doesn't cause thread drift.

Years ago I took some alternative energy classes at community college. We got on about a submarine cavitating(sp) making bubbles under water...

The instructor said that was the blades of the prop creating a vacuum and water boiling at a molecular level. Does that sound right?

I was working in a welding factory 7 days a week 12 hour days and taking classes at night... I may have misunderstood.




posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: Indigent


It turns out that the way water’s behavior changes inside the tiny carbon nanotubes — structures the shape of a soda straw, made entirely of carbon atoms but only a few nanometers in diameter — depends crucially on the exact diameter of the tubes. “These are really the smallest pipes you could think of,” Strano says. In the experiments, the nanotubes were left open at both ends, with reservoirs of water at each opening.

Even the difference between nanotubes 1.05 nanometers and 1.06 nanometers across made a difference of tens of degrees in the apparent freezing point, the researchers found. Such extreme differences were completely unexpected. “All bets are off when you get really small,” Strano says. “It’s really an unexplored space.”

MIT News - Inside tiny tubes, water turns solid when it should be boiling.

The phase change happens and because the water cannot rearrange itself to the familiar form of ice it stops moving, it freezes solid. Pressure against CNTs is not like regular ice expanding because it cannot form that structure. CNTs cannot bust from the inside out because it is not the same configuration as normal, macroworld ice.


These cylindrical carbon molecules have unusual properties, which are valuable for nanotechnology, electronics, optics and other fields of materials science and technology. Owing to the material's exceptional strength and stiffness, nanotubes have been constructed with length-to-diameter ratio of up to 132,000,000:1, significantly larger than for any other material.

Wikipedia: Carbon Nanotube.

That is one place to pull info from but there are others. This is just the quickest.

Besides not knowing that this would happen they do not even know why water would enter the CNT in the first place because CNTs are hydrophobic (they should repel water). I say just be amazed at this and all the other work happening with nanomaterials.

All bets are off when you get really small



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

You resurrected a year old thread and have meticulously carried the last eight pages on your own with only a few diehards catching your posts in the “recent” page after every addition.

Please don’t take this the wrong way, but I highly encourage you to create new threads as you come across new information as long as it’s not redundant.

We need more variety to break up the monotony that is being generated by our resident armchair politicos. With that said, I will go back and read what you have contributed, hoping to learn something new in the process.




posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: tinner07
The instructor said that was the blades of the prop creating a vacuum and water boiling at a molecular level. Does that sound right?



You remembered correctly. This is why propeller design is so important for different types of vessels.

The tip of the prop blade travels several hundred miles an hour, sometimes water cannot be redirected fast enough this causes a heat flash separating the water molecules into less dense air.

The mantis shrimp does the same thing with its supersonic claw.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: tinner07

That is called cavitation if you like to search about it.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 05:15 PM
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a reply to: AlongCamePaul

Thanks , I find that hard to wrap my head around and now you say shrimp do it too??? Good trivia question, " what do submarines and mantis shrimp have in common"? they can boil water under water lol



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: Indigent




That is called cavitation if you like to search about it.


Thanks man, I doubt I will search it up too much but I might. I hate to say things are over my head but some things are. But a little understanding never hurt anybody.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 10:50 PM
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There is another "phase", the Einstein-Bose condensate, which is most fascinating. (in his best Spock voice)

Anyone who enjoys history of science will like the PBS documentary on supercool gasses....trust me.




posted on Dec, 1 2016 @ 08:09 AM
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First thing that came to my mind was superconductors and quantum locking.
Maybe the answer is not to find ways to produce quantum locking at room temp but to freeze something inside a carbon nanotube so low that the tube becomes the superconductor.



posted on Dec, 1 2016 @ 11:59 AM
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hmmm...

Kurt Vonnegut's "Ice-nine" comes to mind, in as much as it is water that is a solid at high temperatures.



posted on Dec, 1 2016 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: AlongCamePaul

Would you say this has potential applications for computer sciences?



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