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MOBY DICK Book Club/Discussion. Let's Dive In!

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posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 07:15 PM
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To all bibliophiles and lovers of knowledge out there, I propose an in-depth study of the American masterpiece Moby Dick.


Please join me! I hope to read, discuss and analyze the text, in addition to sharing with you some of the things I have learned about the novel, author and subject matter. I welcome anything you have to offer as well.


Upon reading Moby Dick last year, I was astounded by the prose, scope, depth and tone. I had to find out more about the author and the subject matter. Thus began a scholarly pursuit of all things whale and Melville. My reading included "Herman Melville Vol 1", by Hershel Parker, "Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex", by Owen Chase, “Mocha Dick: Or the White Whale of the Pacific: A Leaf from a Manuscript Journal, from the Pacific”, by Jeremiah N. Reynold, and "Melville’s Quarrel With God", by Lawrance Thompson. I hope to share most of what I have learned in an upcoming series, and dive deep into the influences and concepts of America’s greatest literary achievement.


What I discovered was fascinating. First off, Melville’s biography is full of adventure, coincidence, tragedy and peril. Secondly, Melville’s experience, family history, and literary contributions are closely connected to America’s emerging cultural, literary, political, and social identity. As Melville’s biographer mentioned, he and his family had an uncanny record of being present at crucial moments in American history, and witnessed (and participated in!) many events that forged the path of the early years of the United States of America. And, finally, while the novel Moby Dick could be read as an epic tale of revenge and obsession, underneath the story lies something much darker, a hidden purpose perhaps. One can indeed read the text as Melville's indictment against God. I plan to explore that aspect of the text with you as well.

This thread will serve as a survey of sorts to gauge how many of you (if any!) are interested in joining me in a Moby Dick book club/discussion, and to give you the opportunity to start reading now
Please respond if you’re interested!


My next installation will cover a biography of Melville and his family, followed by a thread about the real Moby Dick (an albino whale that earned infamy among whalemen in the Pacific by the name of Mocha Dick) and the tragedy of the Whaleship Essex. Once we have established a bit of background, we can get to the book itself. It’s intriguing and engaging material, I promise!


I really hope to hear from some of you! Have a great night, friends.




posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 07:20 PM
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Hands down. My favorite book.

a reply to: zosimov



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 07:21 PM
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originally posted by: Woodcarver
Hands down. My favorite book.

a reply to: zosimov



Great! Can't wait to hear what you have to say about it once I get to the discussion.. (please join!
)

Mine too, btw.

edit on 27-11-2016 by zosimov because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: zosimov

I have a copy here at the house. I suggest we take a chapter at a Time and discuss it ad nausium. It is a very large book and it would take a long time to get through the whole thing. I know there are some good youtube videos on the subject.



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 07:35 PM
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a reply to: Woodcarver

I think that's an excellent approach.

I'm really happy you're interested! Can't wait to hear some of your insights.

If you're game, I'd like to start in about a week, so that I could have a bit of time to create a series of threads about Melville's life, the circumstances that led to this book, and the stories that influenced it.

Nice to have you aboard, Woodcarver!
edit on 27-11-2016 by zosimov because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 07:38 PM
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If you haven't read it, "In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex (2001)" is considered by many to be the most accurate account of the story. In my opinion it's even more gripping than the classic. It's what the recent film screen play was based on. And as usual, the book's better than the film.



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: rexsblues

Hi rex! Thanks for the suggestion.. I haven't read the book you mentioned. I did, however, read an account of that voyage written by Owen Chase, one of the survivers of the hapless voyage. It was the same account that Melville read while on a whaling expedition in the Pacific (given to him by Chase's son).

I do want to check out the book you recommended, though, as I'm sure it was really well written and riveting. Also the objectivity of time and distance could add a different perspective worth checking into.

I appreciate your input. Thanks!



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: zosimov

Cool, I haven't read that one. I've heard of it though, may finally check it out.



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: zosimov


I read that one in high school,,,,,oh my,,,,27+ years ago..ugh
I'll have to break out my copy and read it again.



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Hey, so glad to have you! I don't think you'll be disappointed with a re-read.



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 10:13 PM
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The greatest first paragraph of any book I have ever read, the rest isnt bad as well
I am in



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 10:24 PM
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a reply to: Raggedyman

Glad to hear it!

You are right-- that first paragraph is peerless.

I am excited to re-read and hear what everyone's thoughts are.

Welcome to the crew!



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 10:48 PM
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I do have time to read, and like many, I don't think I've been near the literary version since high school. I am familiar with the general story of course but beyond that I haven't spent much time with that one. I think I have a copy running around the house somewhere ... Hopefully, it won't take me too much time dig it up out of the stacks.



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 12:00 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Great ketsuko! Welcome



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 04:11 AM
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originally posted by: zosimov
To all bibliophiles and lovers of knowledge out there, I propose an in-depth study of the American masterpiece Moby Dick.


Please join me! I hope to read, discuss and analyze the text, in addition to sharing with you some of the things I have learned about the novel, author and subject matter. I welcome anything you have to offer as well.


Upon reading Moby Dick last year, I was astounded by the prose, scope, depth and tone. I had to find out more about the author and the subject matter. Thus began a scholarly pursuit of all things whale and Melville. My reading included "Herman Melville Vol 1", by Hershel Parker, "Narrative of the Most Extraordinary and Distressing Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex", by Owen Chase, “Mocha Dick: Or the White Whale of the Pacific: A Leaf from a Manuscript Journal, from the Pacific”, by Jeremiah N. Reynold, and "Melville’s Quarrel With God", by Lawrance Thompson. I hope to share most of what I have learned in an upcoming series, and dive deep into the influences and concepts of America’s greatest literary achievement.


What I discovered was fascinating. First off, Melville’s biography is full of adventure, coincidence, tragedy and peril. Secondly, Melville’s experience, family history, and literary contributions are closely connected to America’s emerging cultural, literary, political, and social identity. As Melville’s biographer mentioned, he and his family had an uncanny record of being present at crucial moments in American history, and witnessed (and participated in!) many events that forged the path of the early years of the United States of America. And, finally, while the novel Moby Dick could be read as an epic tale of revenge and obsession, underneath the story lies something much darker, a hidden purpose perhaps. One can indeed read the text as Melville's indictment against God. I plan to explore that aspect of the text with you as well.

This thread will serve as a survey of sorts to gauge how many of you (if any!) are interested in joining me in a Moby Dick book club/discussion, and to give you the opportunity to start reading now
Please respond if you’re interested!


My next installation will cover a biography of Melville and his family, followed by a thread about the real Moby Dick (an albino whale that earned infamy among whalemen in the Pacific by the name of Mocha Dick) and the tragedy of the Whaleship Essex. Once we have established a bit of background, we can get to the book itself. It’s intriguing and engaging material, I promise!


I really hope to hear from some of you! Have a great night, friends.


Now there's an oldie!

star and flag for you son!



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: blackadder01

Why don't you join us? It will be fun!



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 05:19 PM
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Dear friends,

I am about to author a thread about Melville's life story up until the time he began writing Moby Dick (subject of a future thread). I had to brush up a bit on his bio, as it had been nearly a year since I read it, but expect to have the thread finished some time tonight. I think you'll be as amazed as I was to find out just how interesting Melville's life story is (hint: includes Revolutionary heroes, cannibals, and mutinies!). Will post a link to the new thread on here.

I am really glad you are all joining me! Can't wait to hear some of your ideas/insights.

Have a great night. Talk to you soon,

-zos

Edit: I plan on breaking this up into several threads based on subject matter so as not to lose vital info; however, if any of you (or a mod) thinks it would be better to keep everything contained to one thread, I am all ears.
edit on 28-11-2016 by zosimov because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 08:37 PM
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Next installment here:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Hope to see you there!



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