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Genetics help please

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posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 04:12 PM
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Hello, im doing some research in to our history and found, well, a lot.. Maybe to much, but the best thing about genes, they dont lie..

Is there anyone in here with experience in genetics?




posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

You might want to be more precise- What kind of experience you are after... genetic genealogy ?



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

It goes from R1a to R1b, and then variants..



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

I'm sure there are people here with the insight you seek, but for those like me who are mostly here to read, some more info would be appreciated.

Don't get me wrong I love the intrigue of a good secret, expecially one posted in the cryptozoology forum, just give us a little more context and/or content please.



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: Quantumgamer1776

I just need help so i dont read wrong into genetics.. Its mostly about Darwin adaptability



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Don't know much but sounds like you are talking about ydna which is passed from father to son but not daughter. Are you looking for a surname?

Sites like Ftdna has information as well as The Genetic Genealogist and this Wiki

Just do a search for Y dna



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

In ySTR variations happens quite often, tree is huge and lot of branches. Is there some exact branch you are looking for M, N ? Where did you tested ?
edit on 27-11-2016 by dollukka because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 05:02 PM
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I took a 4 credit genetics class 20 years ago, not sure how much my brain has retained after all those years though.

I'm old....




posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

x-variations doesnt happen that often?

edit: Milk digestion is that a Y?
edit on 20161127 by tikbalang because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 05:11 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

No X doesn´t change often, if you are a male your get X only from your mother ( as another is Y and that is from your father), totally XY makes you a male, but if you are a female you get 50% from your father and 50 % from your mother.

A bit bizarre question as X and Y are sex chromosomes

edit on 27-11-2016 by dollukka because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

So females are pretty much Lucy today?



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

You've already sort of asked. But I've got experience in Bioinformatics.



posted on Nov, 27 2016 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: dollukka

Although to be fair, for females only ONE X-Chromosome is acive (viz x-inactivation). So that 50-50 is not totally true.



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang

I suggest you read all relevant material pertaining to the subject before you come to any foregone conclusion.

Truth is our understanding of genetics is still in its infancy, that being said completion of the human genome project in April 2003 certainly went a long way to advancing our knowledge of the subject.

edit on 28-11-2016 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 07:19 AM
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I sent in one of those genetics spit tests and the results were questionable... 20% bigfoot, 10% large grey, 30% Neanderthal, 40% Nordic Alien.

My advice is pay a little more for the test, DON'T use "Jenetks propheshunals plus" like I did.



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 09:08 AM
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originally posted by: tikbalang
a reply to: dollukka

x-variations doesnt happen that often?

edit: Milk digestion is that a Y?


No, that is on Chromosome 2.



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 09:20 AM
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tikbalang

Is this what you are referring to?

The Milk Revolution

Proto-Indo-European

The Origin of Species pdf

Haven't researched any of it..but sounds interesting..hopefully you make a thread about your findings..

Thanks,
blend57



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 05:27 PM
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a reply to: MuonToGluon




The gene for lactase – a gene that enables us to digest milk. In most mammals it's switched off in adulthood – it's only needed in infancy when young animals are drinking milk. But in many human beings – not all – it remains switched on during our adulthood. The reason seems to have been that in the ancestors of those human beings they took up dairying; they actually stole the milk from animals


Could neoteny be the perpetrator?



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Lactose persistence is a mutation. Neoteny is not. Both the most common mutations for lactose persistence are SNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) which are perhaps the most simple mutations you can have.



posted on Nov, 28 2016 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: Noinden

But its shuts down after a certain age, doesnt that mean its still active, could you show me where the mutation occured?

Between someone who can digest lactose and one who cant?

Edit: Since lactase's only function is the digestion of lactose in milk, in most mammal species, the activity of the enzyme is dramatically reduced after weaning
edit on 20161128 by tikbalang because: (no reason given)




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