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America’s Students Are Morons Who Can’t Distinguish Real News From ‘Fake News’

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posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 11:36 PM
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originally posted by: TruthsSword
So they wanted people dumb enough to believe the main-streams lies without questioning. But now there is more and more "alternate" news site, they are panicking.

"We deliberately make you dumb and gullible, but it was only meant to be for the lies WE tell!"


People have a choice still. No one is forcing stupidity on everyone. Sure, they can encourage it ...

But unless you and others buy into it, and the ways in which they do...

If people are letting themselves be "dumbed down" then its sadly their own fault.




posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 11:41 PM
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a reply to: Kettu

I completely relate.


So imagine in my day when my dad bought his first calculator, which could only add, subtract,multiply and divide, and was the size of a small typewriter, how things were. In truth, that wasn't that long ago.




edit on 25-11-2016 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:12 AM
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Anyone member Brian Williams "I was there" fake news about getting hit by an RPG and how he had to leave NBC. He made a mistake lol, a bungled attempt. Made some high quality memes like this one.





Point is our news before may have not been as truthful as we thought, now everyone gets to do their edits online.

edit on 26-11-2016 by jellyrev because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-11-2016 by jellyrev because: thinking



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: loam

Me, too. My only reward for participation was my HS diploma. My grades, such as they were, were earned.

No such critter as social promotion.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: seagull

We live in a different world now. That is for sure.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:20 AM
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originally posted by: loam
a reply to: Kettu

I completely relate.


So imagine in my day when my dad bought his first calculator, which could only add, subtract,multiply and divide, and was the size of a small typewriter, how things were. In truth, that wasn't that long ago.





I remember seeing a calculator watch, a Casio I believe. I just knew ... I knew my life would forever change if I could only somehow afford one and hide it at school.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:23 AM
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It's how cool the teacher is, that is most important to the students.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:24 AM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: loam

Me, too. My only reward for participation was my HS diploma. My grades, such as they were, were earned.

No such critter as social promotion.


I'm 35 and we always got participation awards all through gradeschool. Sure, the winner got a bigger trophy or ribbon, but everyone at least got a certificate or something.

I find it interesting to see the generation complaining today about snowflakes and participation awards...since some of them were the parents and teachers giving them out years ago.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:26 AM
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a reply to: loam

It helped that my parents made sure I at least gave it my best efforts.

My Dad's exact quote was "Your report cards had always better say you gave your best effort. Grades are forgivable, less than your best never is."

Damned if he didn't mean it... Math, in particular, was incredibly hard for me. I think the best grade I ever got in HS in any sort of math was a C, but it was a well earned C--quite literally sweated blood to get that C.

Too many, seemingly, aren't held to any sort of standard.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:26 AM
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a reply to: Kettu

Lol

I've shared this story before, but I'll do it again here.

I can remember as a small kid lying in bed and dreaming how cool it would be to have a hand-held-Star-Trek-like-device that would give me access to any information my heart could desire. Little did I know that would actually happen in my lifetime. But at the time, I thought I was engaging in pure fantasy.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:29 AM
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a reply to: Kettu

I'm a touch older than you. It had begun to change while I was still in school, back in the seventies, but kids still got flunked/held back if they weren't performing.

...and generally received little, if any, sympathy. We all had to do the same work, and were expected to perform...if not, there were sanctions and/or tests to find out if there were issues other than laziness.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:30 AM
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a reply to: loam

I remember that, too.

Little did we know, right?



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:31 AM
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a reply to: seagull

I hated math. But my father held a degree in theoretical mathematics. So you can imagine what his expectations were of me.

I had no choice but to learn it. All of these years later, I am so grateful, not only of that expectation, but all of the expectations he had for me. It made me a better person.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:32 AM
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a reply to: seagull

And something I don't see parents doing today (that they did when I was a kid) is handing out goodie bags at birthdays. I've been to a few kids birthday parties (dragged) and I don't see parents my age doing that for the guest kids.

That's something positive I suppose.

Why does every kid at a birthday party have to get some kind of prize for just showing up? So they don't feel left out for not getting a bunch of gifts?

I believe they were called "party favors" or something when I was little. Don't really see that as much today.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: Profusion


The basic issue of a failed educational system is your
sole root cause, my friend. Three generations after the
NEA started 'enhancing' the guidelines, the barrel is
rotten top to bottom. Dare I say it, from following to
its conclusion the most important plank of the Manifesto.

Here's the burr under my blanket.. I ran across it
recently like some little diamond in a goat's keister...

THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD…

1. Formulate a question.
2. Perform research and record observations.
3. Construct hypothesis and make predictions.
4. Test with experiments.
5. Analyze results, draw conclusions.
6. Determine whether or not hypothesis is corroborated, then
7. [what?]Either try again or report results. [/what?]

Whoever foisted this sucker is a politician; because it looks
like he was searching for a certain result. The first half of
Number Seven almost means “...lie, lie again.”, especially to self.

PURE scientific rigor would mean reporting ALL results.
I will finally submit that scientific studies that are funded
by other than the scientist or group (i.e. grants) have more
often than not reflected the funder's desired results.

Forget the rant, and everything else-- the proclamation
in the West Wing about the CIA's mission being complete
is almost there. And we paid for it in taxes.
edit on 26-11-2016 by derfreebie because: If at first you don't succeed broadcast it a few hundred more times.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:38 AM
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a reply to: seagull

Absolutely.

Additionally, I'm also very grateful I was not a kid today. These are very spooky times, where what I think is normal behavior is either criminalized with irrevocable consequences or made clinical, deserving of a medical diagnosis and medication.

My how the world has changed.

edit on 26-11-2016 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: loam

my dad was a freak for math, too. Obviously, it wasn't genetic...

He taught math for a few years before realizing that teaching just wasn't his gig...not enough patience.

I'm not good at it, nor do I like it...bad combination for getting better than average grades.

History and literature, along with archaeology/anthropology, are my things. Hoping I can go back to school in the next couple of years to finish my degrees...but playing politics and sucking up to profs isn't in my nature. Speaking as a former poli-sci major/history minor.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:41 AM
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The logic behind this is.. who goes out of their way to write fake information disguised as an educational piece?

Many kids in high school don't know how to write and don't like writing. It's a chore. So they think writing to others is also a chore. So why write up a filthy lying chore of literacy?

They don't understand that there is a war for information at the moment and in school, they are taught that the teacher is always right, when in actuality the teacher is only following a curriculum put forth by those who don't want you and your children to see the entire picture.

Why do you think College is so expensive and grade school teachers get paid trash salary?
edit on 26-11-2016 by Mizzijr because: Sorry for typos. New phone.



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:42 AM
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a reply to: loam

I have no kids. Most of my peers do...

One observaton I have is that my peers (late 20's and 30's) are entirely to stressed and freaked out about every little thing their kids either do or don't do.

Let your damn kids be...kids. They're made a freaking rubber. Let them eat dirt and whatever. Stop worrying and helicoptering around your kids. And for the love of all that's holy stop posting every insignificant thing they do on social media. I really don't care if your "precious" just ate a dog biscuit.

A lot of my peers (as well as myself) were latch-key kids. We raised ourselves quite a bit. I think that now that these latch-key kids who's parents were always gone at work have their OWN kids...they're over compensating by trying to hover around their kids and be "super parents".

I want to just tell all my parent-friends ... "Chill the heck out, the more you mess with something the more you mess it up."



posted on Nov, 26 2016 @ 12:45 AM
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a reply to: seagull



It occurs to me we sound like a couple of old geezers.

Hysterical, because I really don't think of myself as that old.



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