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Thank-you or Thank you?

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posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:24 AM
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I don't want to go down the Mandela Effect rabbit hole with this...

Just curious; when I was in elementary school we were taught to write a hyphenated "thank-you". It seems these days that everyone has dropped the hyphen and some people weren't taught to write the hyphenated version in the first place.

Any English sticklers who can tell me which is the correct spelling?

Were you taught the hyphen or non-hyphen way? Do you use the hyphen or not?




posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:27 AM
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No hyphen. Never has been hyphenated as far as I have been able to tell. Now there might be a British variant that does.

Hyphens are funny animals. Generally speaking, you try to go without them as much as possible. And they do creep into word pairs where you least expect them.

Kickoff (n) and kick off (v) -- never hyphen

Fairy tale (n) and fairy-tale (adj) -- only hyphenate the adjective form

Hyphenate adjectives formed by word strings -- out-of-this-world

There are sometimes differences between how the Brits prefer to do things and how Americans do it, and since I'm not paid to keep the British differences straight, if this is one of those times, I wouldn't know and you'll have to wait to find out from one of them.

edit on 25-11-2016 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: Kalixi

Educated in the UK, I was never taught the hyphen in English language classes.
Could just have been a crappy school though.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:33 AM
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Have never seen it written with a hyphen. There's no need to use a hyphen with it.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:34 AM
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originally posted by: Kalixi
I don't want to go down the Mandela Effect rabbit hole with this...

Just curious; when I was in elementary school we were taught to write a hyphenated "thank-you". It seems these days that everyone has dropped the hyphen and some people weren't taught to write the hyphenated version in the first place.

Any English sticklers who can tell me which is the correct spelling?

Were you taught the hyphen or non-hyphen way? Do you use the hyphen or not?


Berenstain. A. no E. NO hyphen.

Thank you.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:37 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko



Thanks Ketsuko. I never use the hyphen correctly. Or spell or punctuate or make sense.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:37 AM
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Here is someone view.



The answer as to whether you should or should not hyphenate 'thank you' really does depend on how it is used.

As a VERB - Do not hyphenate.

For example:
- Thank you for meeting me.
- I thank you for this opportunity.

As an ADJECTIVE - Hyphenate.

When 'thank you' is used as an adjective before a noun, it must be hyphenated. We do this to show that the adjective acts as a single idea.

For example:
- Holly likes to send thank-you cards for presents she receives.

As a NOUN - The grammatically correct answer is to either hyphenate, or to create one word.
I'm going to allow you to use your own judgement on this one. My personal preference is to avoid using
'thank you' as a noun. I would use a word like 'gratitude' if the context is formal, or 'thanks' if the context is informal.

For example:
- I would like to offer my gratitude for services rendered. (formal)
- Giving thanks before dinner is a family tradition. (informal)

grammarstammer.weebly.com...


Your welcome

or

your-welcome




posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: Kalixi

In my reality we never used a hi-fin.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:41 AM
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originally posted by: roadgravel
Here is someone view.



The answer as to whether you should or should not hyphenate 'thank you' really does depend on how it is used.

As a VERB - Do not hyphenate.

For example:
- Thank you for meeting me.
- I thank you for this opportunity.

As an ADJECTIVE - Hyphenate.

When 'thank you' is used as an adjective before a noun, it must be hyphenated. We do this to show that the adjective acts as a single idea.

For example:
- Holly likes to send thank-you cards for presents she receives.

As a NOUN - The grammatically correct answer is to either hyphenate, or to create one word.
I'm going to allow you to use your own judgement on this one. My personal preference is to avoid using
'thank you' as a noun. I would use a word like 'gratitude' if the context is formal, or 'thanks' if the context is informal.

For example:
- I would like to offer my gratitude for services rendered. (formal)
- Giving thanks before dinner is a family tradition. (informal)

grammarstammer.weebly.com...


Your welcome

or

your-welcome



Thanks for this! I'm correct about something. Hazah!

And it's "you're" (you are) welcome. Unless you're saying it as "Your welcome was rude"



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: Kalixi

Yes, about "your", I'm screwing around.

So the hyphen is for an adverbs, thank-you card. So in most usage situations, as a verb, it's just thank you.

I thank you for bringing this subject to our attention.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: Kalixi

Be a lot easier just to say " Thanks "




posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:51 AM
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It's usually easier to do things half way.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: Kalixi
I was never taught to use a hyphen. It's short for "I thank you", of course.
The hyphenated version must have evolved in recognition of the way the phrase was becoming almost a single word in practice. Just as "God be with you" developed into "Goodbye".




edit on 25-11-2016 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: roadgravel

You're welcome*



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: roadgravel

I usually work from AP Style backing that up with the Blue Book when I need something more specific.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: Kalixi

Greetings-

Send them flowers and leave it up to the florist to make the mistake... (They'll also take the ridicule for the grammar; spelling fo paw..)



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: Kalixi

Educated in the UK, I was never taught the hyphen in English language classes.
Could just have been a crappy school though.



Then it would take a thread and 1-half to explain the differences betwixt "Private" and "Public" in the U.K. in relation to the "Public/Private" schools on this side of thee pond. We Colonists do it differently...

But then again those 9 years of College were a lot of fun... (as soon as I typed this and read "cheers" Everett Horton "Edward" in the Fred Astaire 1934 classic "The Gay Divorcee" said "CHEER up".. It was quite odd.. )
edit on 10/13/2014 by JimNasium because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 07:00 PM
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a reply to: JimNasium

Your reply was thought provoking but I didn't understand the point you were trying to make.
I would like to though.




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