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How about this nice fireball from Florida?

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posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 09:35 PM
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A lovely giant fireball meteor lit up the sky over Florida this last Monday and was captured on at least three cameras:

Venice, Florida:


Largo in Pinellas, Florida:


North Port, Florida:




The AMS has received over 150 reports so far about of a fireball event over seen over Florida on November 21st, 2016 around 11:15pm EST (Nov. 22nd ~ 04:15 UT). The fireball was seen primarily from Florida but witnesses from Georgia and Alabama also reported the event.

American Meteor Society


An article from ABC notes that:



According to the group, a meteor of fireball magnitude is brighter than the planet Venus in the morning or night sky. Several thousand fireballs occur in the Earth’s atmosphere each day. But the vast majority go unnoticed as they appear over oceans and uninhabited regions or are masked by daylight.

Fireball Spotted in Night Sky Over Florida


That's a fact that I find easy to forget and didn't think of it again until I read the article. That's a strange fact, to me, these things going off in the atmosphere all day and all night.

I wonder what sort of debris they leave behind and how it is incorporated in to our atmosphere.

Hmm.





posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 09:37 PM
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a reply to: Dan00

WOW! Second vid looked like two of them? Good Thread!!
Syx...
Oh and the fact that there are thousands a day?! I didn't know we got pelted like that! I think this is a fairly new thing?...
edit on 23-11-2016 by SyxPak because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 09:39 PM
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A detonation like that certainly dropped rocks, however they are at the bottom of the Gulf.
This one, if you were under it, would have probably had a sonic event very much like Chelyabinsk.
edit on 23-11-2016 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

Second sentence, Agreed!!



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: SyxPak



Second sentence...


You did 2nd Line!






posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: charlyv



A detonation like that certainly dropped rocks, however they are at the bottom of the Gulf.


Sure, that stands to reason. But what about the ones that explode over land, or how the wind might carry the debris. Would I be right to assume that a great deal of the rock is atomized by the explosion? Would there be a fine dust? If so, how much of that sort of thing do you think might be distributed in to the atmosphere?

I don't know. It's just dawning on me now.

Thanks much for participating.




posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 10:06 PM
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The orbital people are trying to fix the radiant of the Leonids to this. It would be a fringe one, but this shower which peaked last week is known for larger objects and some big fireballs, but this one is off the charts.

Associated with the comet Tempel–Tuttle, the 1966 storm was the largest ever recorded, at 100,000 meteors per hour.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 10:27 PM
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I have seen my share of fireballs over Florida in my years, but that one looked like something else to behold entirely! I wonder if this is related to a meter shower been around lately?? I have seen more than a handful of shooting stars over my house last week, and I am surrounded by light pollution in the middle of the city. Well either way, I been making a ton of wishes lately.



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 02:37 AM
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Figures, we moved out of state and s# slowly got fun down there. Cuban quakes, decent hurricane season, and now big-ass meteors XD

Back when I was a teenager down in FL (90's) I & many others over more or less the same area saw a huge mofo pass E to W during a meteor shower. It's permanently etched in my memory, more the sound of it than color (which was mostly green with some other brief color flashes) It was low enough to hear passing, it crashed into the Gulf (which we didn't live too far from) very shortly afterward. I'll never forget the hissing/sizzling and crackling noises as it passed over, it was so damned surreal & nothing sounds quite like it -- as cliche as that sounds.



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 04:21 AM
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Yet another successful test of the ZEUS cannon against ANOTHER attempted archon intrusion...nothing to see here...



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 05:10 AM
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a reply to: Dan00

I suppose in the poetic sense they are as little Faeries returning to the Faerie collective, and every one is a joyous event that triggers a reaction.




posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 05:40 AM
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Beautiful and terrifying. Thanks for sharing!



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Maybe it was the same one I saw, because that was the first one I ever saw when I was like 8-10 years old. Were you going across 60 coming back from Pinellas, and it as visible over the Hillsborough county side??



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: Dan00

LOL THAT!!

Hey, Wife and I saw a screaming flaming fireball streak right across in front of our house, across the street over the huge park there one night, back a few years ago, (more?) in Moline Illinois! Lit up the night like full noon!! It was AWESOME to see, and Hear it!!!

edit on 24-11-2016 by SyxPak because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: Dan00
a reply to: charlyv



A detonation like that certainly dropped rocks, however they are at the bottom of the Gulf.


Sure, that stands to reason. But what about the ones that explode over land, or how the wind might carry the debris. Would I be right to assume that a great deal of the rock is atomized by the explosion? Would there be a fine dust? If so, how much of that sort of thing do you think might be distributed in to the atmosphere?

I don't know. It's just dawning on me now.

Thanks much for participating.




I am happy to participate, and events like this are as wonderful as they are frightening.

The Earth is covered with "strewn-fields". 99% of all large bolides detonate in the upper atmosphere, (and lower, like Chelyabinsk and perhaps this one). Large Irons and huge chondrites can make it to the ground at cosmic velocity, and can be obviously devastating. The large craters all over Earth are testament to this.

When they hit the atmosphere at these speeds (20-80 km/s), it is like hitting a brick wall and the explosions can be many times the energy of of our largest nuclear weapons. We can thank our thick atmosphere for destroying most of them.

Not all of the material is atomized, but falls at terminal velocity in elliptical paths, and this is where we find most of our meteorites. I have been collecting them for over 40 years, and it is a passion. It is so cool to hold a piece of asteroids that are over 4 billion years old!

One of the latest theories concerns a possible atmospheric detonation of a comet over the Great Lakes region, about 13,000 years ago. It is suspected that it blew most of the glacier off of the Laurentide Ice sheet and was responsible for killing most of the Mammoths, Mastadons and early Paleo indians (The Clovis people) in North America. One can only imagine if something like this were to happen today.
edit on 24-11-2016 by charlyv because: content



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 11:57 AM
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I have to laugh at that third video title.
UFO and Meteor.

Seriously? Someone thinks its a UFO?

Excellent footage, nonetheless.





posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 12:08 PM
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originally posted by: worldstarcountry
a reply to: Nyiah

Maybe it was the same one I saw, because that was the first one I ever saw when I was like 8-10 years old. Were you going across 60 coming back from Pinellas, and it as visible over the Hillsborough county side??

No, southern Sarasota County, Venice area, specifically. Wracking my brain here for the specific year, but I was in middle school, so...maybe '97? '98? It was before the neighbor kid I was watching the shower with moved, so definitely one of those 2 years.

LOL,speaking of the neighbor kid, after echoing the adults' awe-heavy "wooooowwww", she chimed in with "Snap, crackle, pop!" referencing Rice Krispies' sound & the sounds the meteor made



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 01:10 PM
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Here is one you would not want to be under. The Sikhote-Alin fall in USSR., 1947.
Iron shrapnel making it to Earth at near cosmic velocity. Like a giant shotgun, it peppered the mountains with hundreds of small craters. This one did not detonate, but rather fractured into thousands of pieces of Iron, some over a hundred pounds.
The then Soviets, honored it with a stamp! Also, one of the easiest to obtain as hundreds of samples can be had on Ebay.



posted on Nov, 24 2016 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

that year sounds about right. Was in the car driving home with my parents from Clear water Beach, when I looked over to my left (North) and saw a greenish glow slowly trailing the sky. Do you remember if you were facing North?? Thats where I saw it.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 03:51 AM
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originally posted by: Dan00
Would I be right to assume that a great deal of the rock is atomized by the explosion? Would there be a fine dust? If so, how much of that sort of thing do you think might be distributed in to the atmosphere?



A 5 km (3.1 mi; 16,000 ft) deep sodium layer is located between 80–105 km (50–65 mi; 262,000–344,000 ft). Made of unbound, non-ionized atoms of sodium, the sodium layer radiates weakly to contribute to the airglow. The sodium has an average concentration of 400,000 atoms per cubic centimeter. This band is regularly replenished by sodium sublimating from incoming meteors. Astronomers have begun utilizing this sodium band to create "guide stars" as part of the adaptive optical correction process used to produce ultra-sharp ground-based observations.[5]

Millions of meteors enter the Earth's atmosphere, an average of 40 tons per year.


en.wikipedia.org...




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