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Don't Hug Me I'm Scared

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posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 03:47 AM
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My son introduced me to this series and I have mixed feelings about it as a consequence. It is both brilliant, and in equal measure, disturbing, but that could be because it is closer to my bones. That's the point. I think? As a parent though, having left the 'safe zone' of children's television some time ago, but not so long ago as that I don't understand the things that attract young minds, and entered into more adult viewing with my child, Don't Hug Me I'm Scared seems to hit me in a delicate spot. It feels very adult in some ways, and I don't get the impression that my son sees it in the same way as I do or that he 'gets' some of the underlying themes (yet?)...at the same time, now is as good a time to start as any in expanding his awareness...after all, there are worse things he could watch...and so I vacillate.






Don't Hug Me I'm Scared (often abbreviated to DHMIS) is a web series of short films, created by British artists Becky Sloan and Joseph Pelling since 2011. It was originally released through the artists' website, later being uploaded on other platforms such as YouTube.[1]

Each episode is made to appear like a typical children's television program, consisting of singing and talking puppets similar to those of Sesame Street, but eventually takes a dark turn, usually involving gore. The series parodies children's television shows by ironically juxtaposing puppetry and musical songs against psychedelic content and disturbing imagery. Six episodes have been released, on the subjects of creativity, time, love, technology, healthy eating, and dreams.


en.wikipedia.org...'t_Hug_Me_I'm_Scared












The original short film became a viral hit and the series grew to become a cult phenomenon. The six episodes have so far amassed 94.6 million views on YouTube.



Drew Grant of the Observer wrote that the series episodes are "horrifying nightmarish absolutely beautiful" and "mind-melting".[28] Freelance writer Benjamin Hiorns observed that "it's not the subject matter that makes these films so strangely alluring, it's the strikingly imaginative set and character design and the underlying Britishness of it all."


What d'ya think?




edit on 23-11-2016 by Anaana because: missing words




posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 03:56 AM
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No wonder people are shooting up schools, if this is what they're showing kids.

I dont believe you, to be perfectly honest. A friend showed him it..

coz, no way...



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 03:58 AM
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a reply to: Anaana

I would be watchful over your Son.

There are pictures online that look very adult, to adults, but to children completely different.

It's highly subliminal and i simply wouldn't trust everything they sell or present to children.

A bit of research will reveal what I mean.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 03:59 AM
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In other words, TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS FIRST.

www.moillusions.com...
edit on 23-11-2016 by JesusXst because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:03 AM
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originally posted by: savemebarry
No wonder people are shooting up schools, if this is what they're showing kids.

I dont believe you, to be perfectly honest. A friend showed him it..

coz, no way...


It's not really for kids.

It's a twisted parody of a kids show made for adults.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:18 AM
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a reply to: savemebarry

They're not meant to be viewed by children, which is my concern. I don't think some parents are screening what their children watch. My son is in his early teens, and we are able to discuss the content in a reasonably intelligent manner. He doesn't have much of a dark side (yet?), therefore I don't know that he would be 'triggered' by anything in the programmes negatively anyway, but in others, I am not so sure.

He came across it because he subscribes to the youtube channel "Game Theory", and that has an off-shoot, "Film Theory" that covered the series. We watched it together. He found it entertaining, I squirmed considerably and asked a lot of questions.

I don't believe in hiding or concealing that 'bad things' go on in the world, but I do supervise, and am on hand to help him to adapt to that. No point raising kids in bubbles.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:21 AM
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a reply to: JesusXst

#! I couldn't see the dolphins!


I get what you're saying though, and I am watchful. I think this is more about me than it is about him. On a few levels.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:26 AM
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originally posted by: mOjOm
It's not really for kids.

It's a twisted parody of a kids show made for adults.


Indeed it is. I think that I am struggling with that transistion, perceptually, between 'child' and 'young adult', and that explains my unease with my son watching it, in addition to it carrying themes that I was familiar with experientially at his age that he is not.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:31 AM
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a reply to: Anaana

I find it odd and interesting and parts disturbing.
I'm not sure all of that's for a young mind, IMO.

We have a great responsibility to raise good humans and with all of the other things that young people are exposed to (even subliminally) in this day I'm not sure that this is something I would want to add to that list.

I think parts of the shows seem to have a good message? learning moments? but, in the end when it turns dark and almost gruesome images come into play the point is lost.

It's a personal choice, really, and only you can decide what you think is best and what your child can handle psychologically and/or emotionally. Perhaps I don't quite 'get' british humor but, depending on my child's age/maturity they wouldn't be permitted to watch this.

With that said, young people today will find a way to watch or be exposed to things with or without parental permission (sometimes) so we should certainly have open dialogue regarding.

Just my two cents.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:44 AM
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originally posted by: TNMockingbird
It's a personal choice, really, and only you can decide what you think is best and what your child can handle psychologically and/or emotionally. Perhaps I don't quite 'get' british humor but, depending on my child's age/maturity they wouldn't be permitted to watch this.


I think the British humour aspect is important. Very little of our humour isn't dark at least around the edges, and he does have a sophisticated humour developed through exposure to the best of that, Monty Python, Blackadder etc. He doesn't and never has had 'dark dreams', he's quite a light, bright person, and frighteningly well-balanced, I have no idea where he gets that from.


originally posted by: TNMockingbird
With that said, young people today will find a way to watch or be exposed to things with or without parental permission (sometimes) so we should certainly have open dialogue regarding.


Always, always that is key. In my opinion. He thinks I'm odd that I find it disturbing, I find it odd that he doesn't find it disturbing. Somewhere in between is where you get to teach them tolerance of difference and of being supportive of the needs and feelings of others.




posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:44 AM
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a reply to: Anaana

It's not for little kids. I don't know how old your son is, but if you feel he can handle The Simpsons or even Adult Swim cartoons, he's fine.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:49 AM
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a reply to: Anaana


I've seen that series before, I find it hilarious, plus it's not meant for children. I don't even think it's all that harmful for them either.

I'm very careful about what my children watch whether it be on tv or the internet. Not much you can do if they stumble upon something not meant for them. That is one reason why I setup parental controls on their devices.

When I was a kid (probably around 8 and up) I used to sneak watch stuff on tv like Tales from the Crypt, Beavis and Butthead, and South Park even. Hell, my dad would let me and my bro watch movies like Aliens, Chuckie, The Thing (I was like 4 or 5 or something), list goes on. Should he have, probably not. My mom would get so mad when she found out about it, lol. But I turned out perfectly fine and so did my bro who is studying to be a doctor.

My point is I guess, some people make such a huge deal about nothing and those that say things like "No wonder people are shooting up schools, if this is what they're showing kids", is totally absurd.


edit on 23-11-2016 by Cherry0 because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-11-2016 by Cherry0 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 04:52 AM
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a reply to: reldra

I currently am saying no to South Park, that's my current cut off...some stuff he tries to watch I find offensive because it is mindless and puerile rather than because it is 'adult' or 'scary', and I object certain kinds of 'stupid' far more than intelligent, well thought out and creatively presented parody.

I guess, retrospectively, all of us kids raised on the BBC in the 70s and 80s, are a little traumatised by the nature of some of the minds that sought to entertain us. My son has been exposed to a healthier agenda I think. Possibly...time will tell.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 05:02 AM
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originally posted by: Anaana
a reply to: reldra

I currently am saying no to South Park, that's my current cut off...some stuff he tries to watch I find offensive because it is mindless and puerile rather than because it is 'adult' or 'scary', and I object certain kinds of 'stupid' far more than intelligent, well thought out and creatively presented parody.

I guess, retrospectively, all of us kids raised on the BBC in the 70s and 80s, are a little traumatised by the nature of some of the minds that sought to entertain us. My son has been exposed to a healthier agenda I think. Possibly...time will tell.


I like South Park, but am not currently raising a child. Up to you as to what age and which child may be able to get the humor from it and any benefit.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 05:02 AM
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a reply to: Cherry0

I haven't gone with parental controls, I haven't needed to but it is on the proviso that I am able to monitor his use. I was always in the room, looking over his shoulder. When he got a PC in his room, different matter, we discussed it and decided we wouldn't go that route, but on a zero tolerance basis, if he breaks the rules, parental controls go on. He hasn't, they haven't. I'll see how old he is when we eventually cross that bridge, and how he breaks them, and with what, but at 13 supervision becomes more like surveillance and it is a tricky one to navigate gracefully I am finding.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: reldra

I don't dislike South Park, just feel he is a couple of years away from appreciating it. There is stupid puerile, and there is intelligent puerile. I think knowing the difference comes with age and experience he currently lacks.



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 05:19 AM
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Well, *rubs eyes*

What a creative and wonderfully wacky show!

I think Anaana that when you mentioned Film Theory, that it is absolutely 100% essential to watch it after you have watched the six episodes, which I implore ATS to do.

I had so many Ah-Ha! moments at the amazingly deep and complex story, which I'm not ashamed to admit I missed most off. So If I might be able to Anaana I will post their brilliant analysis of the show which really tied everything together for me.




posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 05:27 AM
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dbl post sorry
edit on 23-11-2016 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 05:27 AM
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a reply to: TNMockingbird

It really isn't a kids show. I certainly think after watching the theory video I posted above showing that the creators packed in so many frame by frame meta easter eggs that only avid adults/older teens would find, understand and appreciate. There is a message to each episode that might be kid consumable, but probably after the first 30 seconds of each video I'd get the kids out of the room.

However, it is a very uplifting show when you decipher the full story it's a very thought provoking art piece that although dark and filled with complex terrors, has a deeper hidden story that really has to be set out to get past the 'WTF was that' stage.


edit on 23-11-2016 by Qumulys because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2016 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: Qumulys



wow, f***ing amazing, that film theory episode was really well done, spot on
edit on 23-11-2016 by NobodiesNormal because: (no reason given)



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