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Question About The Jersey Devil

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posted on Jan, 26 2005 @ 10:28 AM
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I was wondering if theres been any books written on the Jersey devil or stuff thats been happening around The New Jersey Pine Barrens?


Thanks
Donna




posted on Jan, 26 2005 @ 10:30 AM
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Don't know of any books, but man oh man, there are tons of sites on the internet. I live right smack in the middle of The Pine Barrens, and have had the folklore of the Jersey Devil, as well as other hauntings in the pine barrens all my life - do a google search, it's great stuff.
I love living here!



posted on Jan, 26 2005 @ 10:33 AM
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man your brave, i wouldnt be able to sleep at night, id be that scared lol



posted on Jan, 26 2005 @ 10:35 AM
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Ever been out this way?
Even the water in the lakes, rivers and streams is wild - it's red, like the color of drying blood.



posted on Jan, 26 2005 @ 10:40 AM
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no ive never been before, sounds really interesting tho, i might make a trip one day.



posted on Jan, 29 2005 @ 08:14 PM
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I know an organization that actually goes out and tracks the Jersey Devil. They go out and find proof that it exists. I go to the website all the time.

go to Google and search for the New Jersey Devil Hunters. I forgot the URL.



posted on May, 3 2005 @ 11:15 AM
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i know a few things about the jersey devil and one of the main theories

now being an X-File fan i bought The truth behind the X-Files by Jane goldman. One theory is that a feral child was responsible for the story of a woman and her devil 13th child. But the problem is that Jersay has many 'mystery animals' and they all get the label Jersey devil



posted on May, 3 2005 @ 10:36 PM
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Originally posted by Run4TheHills
I was wondering if theres been any books written on the Jersey devil or stuff thats been happening around The New Jersey Pine Barrens?


Thanks
Donna


Don't know of any personally, but since the Jersey devil is fairly famous, I did a Google search:
www.google.ca...
and it came up with TONS of stuff, take a look-see through that


Hope it's what you're looking for.



posted on May, 4 2005 @ 06:07 AM
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Check your local Barnes & Nobles if you live in New Jersey, they should carry the books currently in print on this subject.

There is a good story in the anthology "Cthulhu 2000", about the pine barrens and energy vortices.

Go here to discuss New Jersey Mysteries

When I was a kid the Jersey Devil was all the rage, every one of us used to think the Devil lived in the woods behind the school, occasionally someone would say "The Jersey Devil!" and point at a window, all the kids would go scurrying up to the windows to see. I for one knew I was totally BS'ing all the other third graders. But still, the Devil occupied our imaginations and artistic ambitions for a good year.

There is a recent movie called "The 13th Child", which is supposed to be about the Jersey Devil, its low budget and not very scary (man in latex custom ya know), but if you are studying the folklore it adds to the fun. About 15 years ago there was a documentary on the subject, it was aired on a local UHF channel, not sure if that ever made it to video or dvd yet.

Some descriptions of the New Jersey devil say that it moves about like a whirlwind, or minor tornado.
Until about ten or 15 years ago such weather conditions were not well known in New Jersey.
Now we get seasonal Tornado warnings in New Jersey, with an occasional devestating touch down, so it could very well be that "the devil", was simply a weather phenomena that most people didn't expect to see on the east coast, and therefore couldn't explain any other way but superstition.

If the "feral child", or "unknown animal", ever did exist, he's long gone now. There hasn't been any sensational occurance of the ookie spook in ages.

Red Ponds in the pine barrens? That is weird. Normally I would suspect red clay, like the lakes of Georgia, but I'm not aware of that much clay in New Jersey, mostly the pine barrens is sand, and peat bogs. Makes me think there is some industrial pollution, but it could very well be just trapped clay deposits. Ok just googled clay deposits in New Jersey and Woodbridge (a mid-southern NJ town) is "Universally known for its fine clay deposits", so that pretty much clears the mystery of red lakes and ponds.





[edit on 4-5-2005 by Legalizer]

[edit on 4-5-2005 by Legalizer]



posted on May, 4 2005 @ 12:27 PM
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i live in jersey also, never had any sightings, granted i spend hours upon hours sittin around in the woods, nothing has ever happened. i wish to be a cryptozoologist when i grow up ( wishful thinkin maybe).....thats one of the creatures im gonna search for.



posted on May, 4 2005 @ 08:22 PM
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According to this
The devil is most likely a sandhill crane, and all "devil" associations to this creature are pure mass hysteria and religious superstitous nonsense.



posted on May, 5 2005 @ 12:40 PM
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Classic depiction of the Jersey Devil


H. Monstrous Bat

Could this be the culprit???

Original credit to member NotTooHappy…




The single species, H. monstrosus, is found from Gambia to southwestern Ethiopia and south to northeastern Angola and Zambia (Hayman and Hill, in Meester and Setzer 1977; Koopman 1975; Largen, Kock, and Yalden 1974).
Head and body length is about 193-304 mm, there is no tail, and forearm length is 118-37 mm. The wingspan in males is as much as 907 mm. This genus has the greatest sexual dimorphism in the Chiroptera; Bradbury (1977) found that males, which averaged 420 grams, were nearly twice as heavy as females, which averaged 234 grams. The coloration is grayish brown or slaty brown. The breast is paler, and the lighter color extends up around the neck, forming a sort of collar. A white patch is present at the base of the ear. Shoulder pouches and epauletlike hair tufts are lacking in both sexes.
Male Hypsignathus may be recognized in flight by the large, square, truncate head. The muzzle is thick and hammer-shaped, hence the common name. Other distinctive features are enormous and pendulous lips, ruffles around the nose, a warty snout, a hairless, split chin, and highly developed voice organs in adult males. Females have a foxlike muzzle similar to that of Epomophorus.
In referring to this genus, Lang and Chapin (1917) commented: "In no other mammal is everything so entirely subordinated to the organs of voice." The adult male has a pair of air sacs that open into the sides of the nasopharynx and can be inflated at will, as well as a great enlargement of the voice box (larynx) and vocal cords. The larynx "is nearly equal in length to one half of the vertebral column," actually filling most of the chest cavity, pushing the heart and lungs backward and sideward. The voice thus produced, a continuous croaking or quacking, is quite remarkable and probably attracts the females. The gregarious chorus reminded Lang and Chapin of "a pondful of noisy American wood-frogs, greatly magnified and transported to the treetops."
The hammer-headed bat inhabits forests, being most common in swamps, mangroves, and palms along rivers. It usually roosts in foliage but has been found in a cave. Bradbury (1977) stated that Hypsignathus roosted at a height of 20-30 meters during the day and would forage up to 10 km from the roost at night. With the ripening of certain fruits, this bat often seeks the high forest or native clearings to feed. It may take the juices of mangoes, soursops, and bananas. Van Deusen (1968) reported that Hypsignathus killed and ate tethered chickens.



posted on May, 5 2005 @ 12:52 PM
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I live in new jersey and the water is not red its brackis (spelling?).this mostly occurs from the cedar trees that are everywhere and all the fallen and decomposing trees .As to the devil the legend has it that its an malformed offspring from the Leeds family.



posted on May, 5 2005 @ 12:57 PM
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Seventh son of a seventh son bit...

It's also called the Leeds Devil often too....if anyone's doing searches...



posted on May, 5 2005 @ 01:27 PM
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Wow Gazrok, that sure fits the description.
I believe the illustration is from an advertisement for a freak show or the like, and if I remember the tail correctly the beast escaped. Very possible for such a show to hold an exposition of an exotic creature with false information about its origins.

Naturally it couldn't find others of its kind to breed with and thus we've not seen it in 90 or so years.



posted on May, 5 2005 @ 01:32 PM
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I'm guessing one of the early wealthy African explorers brought it back to the home country and it got loose creating all kinds of wild stories....



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