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Mindblowing! The universe is expanding (relatively) at over 3x the speed of light!

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posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 05:32 PM
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Check this out :

-A-
The particle horizon (the boundary of the observable universe) has a radius of
about 14.3 billion parsecs (46.6 billion light years).

-B-
For every million parsecs of distance from the observer, the rate of expansion increases
by about 67 kilometres per second.

So:

If you were standing at the edge of the universe, it would be expanding away at about 67 km (~41 miles) per second.


However, as you measure the expansion rate further away from the edge, (for example our current position on Earth) we see some truly amazing results:


One gigaparsec (one billion parsecs) is 1000 megaparsecs, and the expansion speed of the Universe is 67km/s per megaparsec, then the rate of that expansion (at its furthest observable point relative to our curent position) is...


(67 km) x (14 gigaparsecs) or (67 km) x (14000 megaparsecs) = 938000 km/s
...roughly 3.13 times the speed of light, or 2.44 times the distance from the Earth to the moon per second!


So it's like, pretty fast I guess.
;D
Just thought it was cool and wanted to share.



Further learning:

Cornell Edu Link (Is the universe expanding faster than the speed of light?)
Space.com Link (How Can the Universe Expand Faster Than the Speed of Light?)



STAY ASTONISHED

- Adam&Evil



Disclaim:
I performed a search, which turned out some similar posts, yet they were either
- Factually inaccurate / didn't provide links
- Speculative / inquisitive
or
- Did not discuss the rate from our position to the edge
...so I made my own

edit on 20-11-2016 by ADAMandEVIL because: Edits: Text / Pic / Link / Title




posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

So, faster than the speed of light is possible then?




posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

please change the color



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: corblimeyguvnor
a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

So, faster than the speed of light is possible then?



Star Trek was ahead of its time for sure. Warp 10 is doable!



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 05:45 PM
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originally posted by: corblimeyguvnor
a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

So, faster than the speed of light is possible then?



Only in the case of fields. You can move a Gaussian field at a far greater rate than the speed of light.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 05:46 PM
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I'm almost 100% positive that scientist have no idea what their doing.



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: Darkmadness




I'm almost 100% positive that scientist have no idea what their doing.



Convincing you about a tale of a elaborate fantasy?



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

The point is all the physics - and the astrophysics - that the terrestrial 'scientists' think they know is wrong.
They base their calculations on the redshift of cosmic objects.

But redshift - as *Halton Arp demonstrated already back in the 70's - does not measure the speed stars and galaxies are moving away, nor the distance from the observer.

Thus, all the foundations of these calculations are wrong and baseless.
And the so-called "Big Bang" is a hoax.

*see Galaxy NGC 7603 and its four quasars.


But, on this planet, to put into discussion the sacred dogma of the Holy Big Bang is heresy,
as Halton Arp and others sadly experienced.



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 06:01 PM
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Um, not to be a wet blanket but you may have missed part of your equation. (ie. rate of expansion in X) what is it expanding into? I think it's Null (space?) which would equal to 0 (zero), however the relativistic speed, observing from the "inside" would seem to be faster than light. The speed of expansion would be both faster and slower than the speed of light depending upon observation point. (inside or outside the universe.) So, even though it seems faster than the speed of light, it's really not.



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 06:11 PM
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Yeah, as if it is even possible for us to measure that from this point in space. I am skeptical about this. I can't say it is true or not, just that I do not believe we could determine if this is happening.



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 06:17 PM
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And WHERE'S the center?



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: cavtrooper7
And WHERE'S the center?


If the Universe is infinite then everywhere is the center.



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 06:24 PM
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The problem I have with faster than light expansion of the Universe is if true, light from the edge hasn't reached us yet, so how do we estimate where the edge is?



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: HeywoodFloyd

This was an informative post that sent me through a cool infojourney. Thanks. I often wonder how much misinformation scientists and their professors before them just regurgitate through no fault of their own but rather that of the books they were taught from. electric-cosmos.org... - was a link that was easily digestible. Now I'm no scientist myself but it was cool to see something something so fundamental such as how we measure distances in space has been called into question by the assistant of Hubble himself.



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 06:41 PM
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originally posted by: corblimeyguvnor
a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

So, faster than the speed of light is possible then?


No. The universe is being contracted in front and expanded behind . That is what gives the appearance of FTL



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

So is the universe like a pulse of universeness going through something?



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 07:13 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: cavtrooper7
And WHERE'S the center?


If the Universe is infinite then everywhere is the center.

It seems the term expansion demands an origin.

b
edit on 20-11-2016 by Bspiracy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 07:33 PM
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originally posted by: ragsntatters
a reply to: Gothmog

So is the universe like a pulse of universeness going through something?

According to popular physics theories , yes. Space is only created as the universe expands. Then expanded behind. Thus the "illusion" of FTL



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 07:35 PM
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originally posted by: Bspiracy

originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: cavtrooper7
And WHERE'S the center?


If the Universe is infinite then everywhere is the center.

It seems the term expansion demands an origin.

b

Yes , a tiny singularity containing all mass , energy , and time.



posted on Nov, 20 2016 @ 07:46 PM
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a reply to: ADAMandEVIL
I have a few thoughts…

What is the force that is said to accelerate galaxies away from each other? If space is empty and is expanding then how could it apply a force on mass?

How can any force accelerate mass beyond the speed of light and this not be considered a violation of relativity?

If there is no force then how can mass be accelerated? Do we violate the laws of motion or relativity or perhaps both here?

I think the problem started when QSOs were shown to have red shifts that indicated they were farther away than the age of the Universe. This “look back time”, as it was called, was thought to allow us to look further back, or rather farther away, than the universe is old.
Perhaps some unknown, unmeasurable thing is somehow accelerating galaxies away from each other at faster than light speeds or Halton Arp was right and there is a problem with our understanding of the Hubble read shift and it is not a constant.
Intrinsic Redshift?


edit on 11/20/2016 by Devino because: (no reason given)




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