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Paper marbling - Suminagashi

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posted on Nov, 19 2016 @ 08:48 PM
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I just browsed through Youtube and stumbled across something called paper marbling, an old art form which i thought was interesting.. And i like to share it.



Paper marbling is a method of aqueous surface design, which can produce patterns similar to smooth marble or other kinds of stone. The patterns are the result of color floated on either plain water or a viscous solution known as size, and then carefully transferred to an absorbent surface, such as paper or fabric. Through several centuries, people have applied marbled materials to a variety of surfaces. It is often employed as a writing surface for calligraphy, and especially book covers and endpapers in bookbinding and stationery. Part of its appeal is that each print is a unique monotype.




posted on Nov, 19 2016 @ 09:12 PM
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Cool vid. This reminds me of Hydro Dipping, or Water Transfer Printing, Hydrographics(sic).
The fun starts at 2:00

There are many videos on Ytube for this method of transferring print.



posted on Nov, 19 2016 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Well, looking at the photo, it looks to be an offshoot of what is called a "wet palatte"... Basically, you take a very thin sponge (think, maybe a CM thick), with a special kind of paper put over it (for the life of me I cannot remember what it's called since this last time I did this), and you then saturate all of it with water so that it's is slightly lower in level than the paper on top of the sponge.

The purpose of this is to keep your blended colors "open", in otherwords..... you can blend several special colors...but not have to quickly use them. The paper is such that it keeps the pigment floating on top, and wet without drying. In some cases you can actually put a lid on top, and be able to keep the paint "open" overnight, so that you can return to it the next day and continue working.

It is a beautiful technique. Seeing the photo brings a harsh reality to mind...memories of when my eyes were not shot to hell thanks to being a male of a certain age....and I painted miniatures hours on end for wargaming.

Put on some good music. Open a beer. Paint. Hours would fly by.....and it was very peaceful. I miss this.











edit on 19-11-2016 by NuncaPiensas because: Are you down with O.C.D.? Yeah you know me!



posted on Nov, 22 2016 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Cool Videos from everyone, i really liked the one you posted tikbalang! Something i am willing to try myself.



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