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Can ATS crack this uk intelligence agency code.

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posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 06:16 AM
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Hi everyone,
Juat wanted to post this to see how long it takes my fellow ats brothers and sisters to crack this one..
Set by GCHQ which is a UK government intelligence agency, it is rated 4 out of 6 on the enigma scale meaning it is pretty difficult.

Here’s a note from GCHQ Puzzle Master Daniel:

“It’s definitely a tricky one. We’ve rated it as a four out of six on our Enigma Rotor Scale of Difficulty. So don’t expect to crack it straight away. It will take plenty of brain power. Even better, I’d recommend putting the kettle on and getting a bunch of your friends, family or work colleagues together to bring some collective thought to the problem. Good luck!”


So here is the puzzle..




And a little clue as to how to solve it: The key to unlocking the puzzle is identifying Samuel, Louis and Ludwik. There are links between them.

So ATS lets see how long it takes..


BBC




posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 06:19 AM
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Just noticed whilst looking over the transcript.. It seems only four letters are used over and over..
A I M and N.



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 06:30 AM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

Done it, it says:

"We here at GCHQ are creeps who like to masterbate whilst watching members of the British public go about their days".




posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote Rime of the Ancient Mariner whilst on an opium bender.
Louis Pasteur was good at chemistry.
Ludwig van Beethoven loved to indulge in pharmaceuticals.



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 07:11 AM
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originally posted by: Sublimecraft
a reply to: Misterlondon

Samuel Taylor Coleridge wrote Rime of the Ancient Mariner whilst on an opium bender.
Louis Pasteur was good at chemistry.
Ludwig van Beethoven loved to indulge in pharmaceuticals.






Is this the answer..? If so how did you come to this conclusion?
Or was it just googling the names..?



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 08:37 AM
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The conditional statement in logic math is probably the key " if not P then Q" type of thing. Please dont make me elaborate cause its going to take me forever to do some 'splainin

the statement is a compound statement which can be expressed by math using logical connectives, these create an algorythm in the form of truth tables offering comparitive negations (if so desired) but it also illustrates through the table a sequence. I think that using this method will best illustrate a means of solving the puzzle...

I am working on it right now.
edit on 18-11-2016 by Brotherman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 09:02 AM
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My guess of Tim is the guy who designed the web being British and all en.wikipedia.org...

But for some reason i bet its like one of their usual things of moving the letters around to make a pattern which probably won't make much sense unless you understand base 31 maths or something similar.

The final form is pretty much a verbal recording so then we'd need to work out what language it is, then it would need to be written down in whatever language and then work out who Ludwik is to be able to see what languages they have knowledge of and see if they match anyone named tim.



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

It is a trippy one.

One thing I noticed is that first line only uses AIN while the third line only uses AIM and second line is the hybrid. Guessing this has something to do with Samuel, Louis and Ludwik.

Pharmaceuticals might prove useful in this case, at least to prevent a headache from looking at the transcript.




posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: Op3nM1nd3d

I still think using Logical connectives from words to truth tables is the key to all that, I don't think he is correct.



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: Brotherman

It`s their clue, not of the OP. I think there is more to it, otherwise it wouldn`t be that high on the enigma scale.



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 09:47 AM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

the cryptic underneath can be looked at like this so far

2 7 9 2 5 2 2 5 3 8 2 6 7
2 7 9 2 5 2 2 5 3 8 2 6 7
2 7 9 2 5 2 2 5 3 8 2 6 7

if looked at as character frequency per line regardless of what letter used, in logic connectives the only real words that matter are things like, if, and, if and only if, if-then, or, not. The statement above is most certainly a logical connective using a compound statement, I believe that this statement and those letters/ (numbers derived) cross referenced with a truth table derived from the statement is the answer to solve.
edit on 18-11-2016 by Brotherman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: Brotherman

I don`t think you need external sources for these names. It`s a part of the puzzle, a placeholder or a navigation of sorts if you ask me.



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: Op3nM1nd3d

It is a logic connective problem to be solved, it involves venn diagrams and logic

summary of wtf I am on about

I think the total of the 2 separate pieces of information is the answer to the question, I think the worded part is a formula and the cryptic part is a ratio.



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 11:55 AM
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originally posted by: Brotherman
a reply to: Op3nM1nd3d

It is a logic connective problem to be solved, it involves venn diagrams and logic

summary of wtf I am on about

I think the total of the 2 separate pieces of information is the answer to the question, I think the worded part is a formula and the cryptic part is a ratio.


Bravo



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

my truth table sucks because it is one that negation is hard to do to make complete. I am trying to say that whoever did not transcribe anything etc etc to make the sequence below make any kind of sense at least to me. I am missing not only the point but apparently the math, last time I was interest in an op like this was the language of vampyr thread...



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: Misterlondon


edit on 18-11-2016 by Brotherman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 01:42 PM
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a reply to: Brotherman

Can`t argue with that, there is always logic behind it. What you are missing is a set of rules which I believe are these three names as the three lines. All of the same sequence with second line being the intersection. If the names themselves are the key to decrypt the message, I can`t tell. Right now I`m trying to find a pattern but no luck so far...

I might lose patience on a Friday night though



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 01:44 PM
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All right!

Now attempting to solve, please stand by.

Found four more, previously unnoticed, patterns in the code. Stand by.


edit on 18-11-2016 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: Op3nM1nd3d
a reply to: Brotherman

Can`t argue with that, there is always logic behind it. What you are missing is a set of rules which I believe are these three names as the three lines. All of the same sequence with second line being the intersection. If the names themselves are the key to decrypt the message, I can`t tell. Right now I`m trying to find a pattern but no luck so far...

I might lose patience on a Friday night though


I think the names are not of any value you could use the eagles, cowboys, and buccaneers for names and the answer would still work itself out. the name is not relevent it is the condition or....



posted on Nov, 18 2016 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: Brotherman



CLUE: The key to unlocking the puzzle is identifying Samuel, Louis and Ludwik. There are links between them!

source


You tell me




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