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Britain Has Passed the Most Extreme Surveillance Law Ever Passed in a Democracy'

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posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: ThePeaceMaker

Why do you think AI is being pushed along so much in recent years.

It won't be people monitoring everything you do but Artificial Intelligence running search algorithms to check if you're behaving, tracking everything you do from what things you purchase on your credit/bank cards to what websites you browse, what you say online, on the phone and even what you send in text messages.

Throw in Quantum computing and it will be possible for a single AI to search billions of records all at once and will likely be able to break any encryption you may use to secure your communications

Snowden exposed the NSA for monitoring US citizens to the public, you don't think GCHQ is doing the same, considering the UK is supposedly has the best Intel agencies ?

Doesn't matter if the ISP's refuse to hand over the data, if it's stored digitally you can bet your life the intel agencies will have already seen it before officially requesting for it




posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:31 PM
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originally posted by: AshFan
Britain Has Passed the Most Extreme Surveillance Law Ever Passed in a Democracy'


Britain is a democracy?
I didn't know that.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:42 PM
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just wondering how 'they' are going to keep track of people with more than one email account? more than one PC? cell phone, land line, tablet, laptop, etc.,?



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: HeywoodFloyd

Haha I get your point, but the ways two don't look like a democracy are balanced out by others. For instance they don't have as much of a say in the leaders but they'll get referendums from time to time.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: Misterlondon

originally posted by: AshFan
a reply to: smurfy

They have just created their very own panopticon. You are trapped on an island and everything you do it being recorded.


We have boats.. Although The two huge land masses either side of our island are not that appealing either. Especially the one to the west of Ireland..


What do you have against Newfoundland and Labrador?



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: AshFan

While I can see this is a cause for concern I also can see that this is no different from what GCHQ and the NSA have been doing for yonkers.

For me personally I don't really care if they store my browsing history, but if for instance they arrest someone with possible involvement within a terrorist group whom they believe is about to do something drastic, but they have no solid evidence, then perhaps this is just the information needed to save lives and prevent it.

Yes its a bit # and I am sure my view is unconventional, but they aren't after the little guy. It's not like i'm going to get a knock on the door regarding downloaded films, watching iPlayer without a TV licence or from visiting alternative media sites


However if you are concerned, there is always Tor browser. Your ISP won't see a thing that they can make sense of
edit on 17/11/2016 by constant_thought because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: pikestaff

AI and Quantum computing, with only humans needed to look at anything flagged suspicious by the AI results



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: Misterlondon

We have boats.. Although The two huge land masses either side of our island are not that appealing either. Especially the one to the west of Ireland..


Why you gotta dig on Canada??




posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:30 PM
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The Investigatory Powers Bill. It's not really that bad and no worse than the powers available in other developed nations, although the OP does seek to dramatise. Bear in mind that while this is obviously a Bill proposed by the Government, the SNP and Labour did not vote against it, indicating tacit support.

Wikipeadia
Gov
Gov fact sheets
Hansard record of debate tio give a flavour of scrutiny

A few points about the Bill.

1. It sets up a new body (Investigatory Powers Commission) to provide the oversight that we don't really have at the moment, or are completely muddled... This is a judge-led body.
2. Puts into law restrictions in police/intelligence snooping on politicians.
3. Updates loads of pre-technology laws therefore removes legal ambiguity which has (let's face it) allowed the intelligence services free reign.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:43 PM
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originally posted by: AshFan


The UK has just passed a massive expansion in surveillance powers, which critics have called "terrifying" and "dangerous." The new law, dubbed the "snoopers' charter,"



Britain Has Passed the Most Extreme Surveillance Law Ever Passed in a Democracy'



This is just sad. What are they so afraid of? How did this get passed into law? WAKE UP YOU UKers!!


Come on dude?! There's no 'waking up' from this emergent paradigm. It's not a UK thing is it? It's an 'every person on the planet' thing.

China, Five Eye Nations and Russia have been monitoring and storing everything we do online for years. The only difference here is the UK has been forced to make it common knowledge and admitted it.

To be honest, my biggest issue isn't with the surveillance or the storage. Privacy matters and even that isn't my overriding concern. The greatest, most profound problem is that a Totalitarian system will have access to all of it and become borderline omnipotent.

These laws don't protect governments against future dictators. In their rush to know everything, they're creating the very systems that may one day empower Totalitarianism.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: HeywoodFloyd




Britain is a democracy?
I didn't know that.

I think we showed our democratic credentials on June 23rd.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:47 PM
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Oh the drama!

Its like people in the 'states have never heard of the NSA and Echelon.

Newsflash - you guys set the bar - this is the British Government catching up a little - 35 miles up the road from me is a little NSA facility called (quaintly) RAF Menwith Hill which has the capability of tracking every electronic communication on Earth. What do you think those guys in there are doing all day every day?
edit on 17/11/16 by neformore because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: AshFan

I knew a man who worked at GCHQ at a time when GCHQ staff were being murdered/suicided in sequence. He said everyone was scared because no-one knew what the common denominator was. Any one of them may have been working on the subject that was being suppressed, but because they all keep their work secret from each other they couldn't know if they would be next. Workplace stress. No wonder the local dealers get supplied with the cleanest and highest quality recreational substances to supply GCHQ staff with. "It practically comes with a 'Government Approved' stamp on it." I was told by someone who'd seen it delivered.

The general population don't need to worry about spies. They're just like us but with less honour.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:58 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: HeywoodFloyd


Britain is a democracy?
I didn't know that.

I think we showed our democratic credentials on June 23rd.


well, they let you out of the cage, from time to time,
and give you some candies...

until 100 years ago Great Britain was a great country,
a huge, powerful empire which encompassed one quarter of the globe.

and now?

one day I will write a thread on this topic.
you are invited to participate.


edit on 17-11-2016 by HeywoodFloyd because: edit



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

When did you vote for any PM?
I've only ever voted for a prospective MP to represent my constituency.
You do live in Britain don't you?



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: HeywoodFloyd




until 100 years ago Great Britain was a great country, a huge, powerful empire which encompassed one quarter of the globe.

Britain is still a great country , we don't need the chains of Empire to show how great we are.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand




When did you vote for any PM?

I voted for Tony Blair in 97 not just the Labour party.
A leader should have their own mandate not one that's passed down.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

afraid of a Totalitarian system?

you don't need to wait.
Here you have it:


"The perfect dictatorship would have the appearance of democracy, a prison without walls in which the prisoners would not dream of escape. A system of slavery where, through consumption and entertainment, slaves would love their servitude"

Aldous Huxley


and it applies perfectly both to Great Britain and to the USA.
and to all the western European countries which, as a matter of fact, are just colonies of the USA.

A Perfect Dictatorship served on a silver plate.

Enjoy.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 02:18 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: HeywoodFloyd


until 100 years ago Great Britain was a great country, a huge, powerful empire which encompassed one quarter of the globe.

Britain is still a great country , we don't need the chains of Empire to show how great we are.


well, we can have a fruitful and interesting discussion on this topic (but in another thread.)



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 02:21 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: grainofsand




When did you vote for any PM?

I voted for Tony Blair in 97 not just the Labour party.
A leader should have their own mandate not one that's passed down.

Did you live in Blair's parliamentary constituency?
No?
You just voted for an MP then.
The only people who vote for a prime minister are the members of the particular political party they represent.
Don't be dishonest.



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