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ALL EYES on Saudi Arabia: No Saudi Oil Says Trump

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posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 10:53 AM
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a reply to: DustbowlDebutante

what? I think you are confused.. The US can handle pretty much any grade of oil then we export the good stuff..
We import only 1/4 of the oil we use


Q: But the situation conjures up this image of two tankers ships passing each other. One is heading toward the U.S., and one is heading away. It’s like we’re bringing in the same product as we’re sending out.

A: Well, not necessarily. We’re not bringing in the same product. The light crude oil or the condensate we are exporting is actually much different stuff than your classical medium gravity, API gravity dense crude oil that we are using in our refineries.

In popular opinion, they’re all rolled into “crude oil.” But they have different compositions and they can not be processed by the same refineries. So, we are trying to export some of the light stuff, so to speak, while we are importing much heavier stuff to process in our refineries.

Many of our refinieries have been specialized to process much heavier crudes from Venezuela, from Mexico, so you can’t change them overnight. That’s why we’re importing oil and we’re exporting gasoline, lubricants, and other products and at the same time, we’re exporting condensate and light crude.


Source


edit on 17-11-2016 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-11-2016 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 11:08 AM
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We could also subsidize the renewable energy equally to oil and gas. How about just split the current oil and gas subsidies with renewable manufacturing. 21.5 billion should be a boost to renewable energy sector. No need to spend 43 billion subsidizing any industry. Especially one making hundreds of billions in profit.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 11:19 AM
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Oh how do i love to see a saudi...wringing his hands with worry. They have done us wrong for a long time. its time to pay them back ten fold. We have enough Oil. we just need to refine it and keep it ourselves.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: Reverbs

Maybe the way in which I understand and explain it is confusing. This may be a better explanation of what I was trying to say:


Second, not all crude oil is the same. It ranges from light to heavy, high to low sulfur and sour to sweet. The bulk of the oil currently produced in the United States is light oil. And not all refineries are the same. Many Gulf Coast and Midwest refineries were designed to process heavy oil from Canada, Venezuela and Mexico. To use more light crude domestically, refineries would need to pay less for their oil feedstock and would run in a suboptimal fashion, or require a significant investment in new infrastructure. “There’s a mismatch between the new production we’re developing as an industry and our country’s existing refining capacity,” said Ryan Lance, ConocoPhillips Chairman and CEO. “To process this new, lighter oil, refineries would have to operate inefficiently or at a reduced rate. They need to buy oil at a discount in order to make it economic to refine it, which hurts domestic producers and ultimately, consumers.”


Source

I had it backwards. Our refineries are geared towards heavy sour crude while what we produce is sweet light. So we export the sweet light and import the heavy sour to refine.

I still think we should retrofit/refurbish our current refineries, or build new ones where appropriate, create jobs, keep our dollars at home and tell the Saudis to kick rocks.

But that's just my opinion. Working in this industry, and with oil & gas being the lifeblood of my home state, I'm obviously very biased.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: DustbowlDebutante

Thats the Oil execs telling you they cant do it and lying about their ability to do so to keep the cost high.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: DustbowlDebutante

That's what I meant you had it backwards lol..

As in, we do NOT need the Sauds lighter oil.

we have the best refineries in the world which is why we export 4.7 Million barrels a day of petroleum products like gasoline.

only 1/4 of the oil we use to make petroleum products comes from outside the US.

It's only because we use so much and export so much people don't realize we are one of the biggest energy suppliers in the world.

WE export our own light oil similar to the saudi oil.

and we export around 18,000,000 barrels of gasoline per month.

hence the mismatch there on our current refining production numbers is easily fixed by increasing those refineries, stopping our exports on oil, and stopping buying from the sauds.

easy fix.

edit on 17-11-2016 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: yuppa
a reply to: DustbowlDebutante

Thats the Oil execs telling you they cant do it and lying about their ability to do so to keep the cost high.


Yet another swamp that needs to be drained.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: Reverbs

For those that don't know it won't be long before the USA passes Saudi Arabia in oil production.. Russia is still at the top.

Oil Production graph early 2016
edit on 17-11-2016 by Reverbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: loam

Yep, they donated to her campaign, so yep



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 12:58 PM
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This is one more step in the demise of the hydrocarbon economy.

Which means, what is going to take its place? The choices seem clear: hydrogen and/or nuclear fusion. I have a theory on fusion that requires two additional items: energy storage and electricity transmission. My theory is that those two items need to be in place prior to a fusion reactor coming online. Just in the last month or so steps have been made towards making metallic hydrogen which is speculated to be a crystalline form and a superconductor at room temperature. Harvard has just made several samples so room temp super conductive electric wires are still a ways off. Today, they found a dye that can be used as an electrolyte in a redox flow battery. So cheap energy storage is a year or two off as well. Most fusion research target the 2020s.

That means hydrogen could be the interim thing. That source still needs infrastructure to be effectively used. So that is a few years off as well.

Hum. Unless there is something we are not being told then neither are quite ready for prime time.

Either way, it looks like the days of oil are numbered. And Saudi Arabia is looking at an up coming perfect sh# storm of all time. This coming from a resident where most, if not all, of the state's budget is based on the price of a barrel of oil and we are struggling at current prices ~40/bbl which is about half of what was projected for state income. This might be the perfect time to sever ties with SA and oil. A bit premature as there is no direct replacement but it is good timing.

Gulp, I am agreeing with the Trumpster! I guess I am a hypocrite. I hope I do not end up saying that too often over the next four years...
edit on 17-11-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: grammar nazi

edit on 17-11-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: clarity



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: Reverbs

Cool, as a sign of good faith we can buy from Russia instead of SA.

It will help them to since we did crash the ruble.

And bolster relationships, this silly pissing match needs to end.


edit on 17-11-2016 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-11-2016 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: Reverbs

Exactly. We could put our people to work in our own oil fields, refine our oil and then use that oil. We don't need anyone else's oil, in all honesty.

And it seems to me that keeping things more local, creating jobs, updating infrastructure...these things can only be good for our economy.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: loam

Probably a good move.

Supporters of terrorism including 9/11 and Hillary campaign.

Lets distance ourselves.



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: DustbowlDebutante

Especially if we look to increase energy efficiency at a commensurate rate of redirecting to self reliance.

Also, what do you think of abiogenesis of hydrocarbons?

a reply to: Urantia1111

I saw what you did there...



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

Agreed. Waste not, want not.




Also, what do you think of abiogenesis of hydrocarbons?


I'm afraid I don't have the scientific background to even have an opinion on that...lol. I have no idea how it got there, I just know my paycheck depends on getting it out of there



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 03:34 PM
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I wasn't aware of this fact, but it may help explain why we haven't ever changed our refineries and it may make it more difficult for us to quit the saudi oil in favor of refining and consuming our own:


Saudi Arabia is the largest Middle Eastern oil supplier to the U.S. with an 11% market share and has also invested heavily in U.S. downstream assets (refineries) to help lock in that supply.


Source

So not only have we been buying their oil, we have also sold our refineries to them in part...

So, say we quit importing saudi oil with the plan to retrofit/refurbish/repurpose our refineries to be able to refine locally produced crude...they could feasibly block the changes to the refineries and force us back to buying their oil.

Does anyone know if they could do that?



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: DustbowlDebutante

This is a good read as there are several things I did not know either. Oilprice.com Dear President Trump or President Clinton, Here is Your Energy Agenda.

It was written in March but still has kernels of knowledge in there scroll down to the "Shale oil" section. There is the statement that the US imports 8 million bbls a day and 1 mbbls is from Saudi Arabia. The oil that SA sends to is high in sulfur and the refinery in TX they own is optimized to refine that junk.

They (SA, Aramco) do not own all of the refiners in the US. They own 3 in the gulf and the Texas one is the big one. So, if they did lock us out but then what? We would just go to another one and raise their taxes! Probably block foreign ships from going there as well. In no time they would sell controlling ownership back to US companies.

Also, there was an announcement not too long ago about the biggest oil field found here in Alaska. Something like 5 billion barrels or something (did not pay much attention). AK oil is the "sweet" crude while SA is selling "sour" stuff. That is a step up right there.

I think we can live without Saudi oil but not sure if they can live without the US! Maybe then they will stop abandoning Rolls Royces in the dessert! Must be tough to be forced to live life as just a plain old millionaire.


edit on 17-11-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: grammar nazi



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 04:43 PM
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a reply to: loam

This is excellent news and the newly-discovered reserves will play a major part in oil independence. As just one example of Trumps plans, he intends to strengthen the US military to levels never seen before. That will undoubtedly include significant hardware upgrades. The US military is one of the single largest consumers of petroleum, today. Imagine how much you could potentially need moving into the future under Trumps plans for the military?

Making S.A the Enemy No.1 would almost ensure Trumps green light to take their oil reserves at some future point in time, after his plans for the US military are complete.

Do you see where I'm going with this?



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

No.

Making them an irrelevancy hardly makes their oil an attractive target-- that is assuming you're not a peak oil guy and assume renewables won't be in full swing by the time it all runs out.



edit on 17-11-2016 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2016 @ 06:41 PM
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Wow operation dessert storm continues...




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