It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Help ATS via PayPal:
learn more

Interactive map reveals hidden details of the Milky Way

page: 1
26
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:
+6 more 
posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 10:10 AM
link   
This may be interesting to some ? the interactive map on the GLEAMoscope website is Amazing.. Published today ..




SEE THE LIGHT In this Gleamoscope image from a radio observatory, the Milky Way appears as a band of light in this view toward the center of the galaxy. Dots in the background are other galaxies; colors indicate different radio frequencies.


From ScienceNews.. www.sciencenews.org...



There’s much more to the universe than meets the eye, and a new web-based app lets you explore just how much our eyes are missing. Gleamoscope presents the night sky across a range of electromagnetic frequencies. Spots of gamma rays pinpoint distant feeding black holes. Tendrils of dust glow with infrared light throughout the Milky Way. A supernova remnant — the site of a star that exploded roughly 11,000 years ago — blasts out X-rays and radio waves. Many of these phenomena are nearly imperceptible in visible light. So astronomers use equipment, such as specialized cameras and antennas, that can detect other frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. Computers turn the data into images, often assigning colors to certain frequencies to highlight specific details or physical processes. In Gleamoscope, a slider smoothly transitions the scene from one frequency of light to another, turning the familiar star-filled night sky into a variety of psychedelic landscapes. Pan and magnification controls allow you to scan all around the night sky and zoom in for a closer look. The interactive map combines images from many observatories and includes new data from the Murchison Widefield Array, a network of radio antennas in Australia. Over 300,000 galaxies appear as dots in images of the new radio data, described in an upcoming issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The radio map by itself can also be explored on mobile devices in a separate app called GLEAM, available on Google Play.



gleamoscope.icrar.org... ( WOW )




edit on 15 11 2016 by skywatcher44 because: .




posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 10:30 AM
link   
This is amazing!

Thanks for posting it.



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 10:34 AM
link   
Fabulous, thanks for posting this.



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 10:35 AM
link   
s&f Thank you for posting this.
Fantastic stuff.




posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 11:31 AM
link   
Very cool. Still amazes me how many other galaxies there are (that we can see)



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 12:31 PM
link   

originally posted by: skywatcher44
This may be interesting to some ? the interactive map on the GLEAMoscope website is Amazing.. Published today ..




SEE THE LIGHT In this Gleamoscope image from a radio observatory, the Milky Way appears as a band of light in this view toward the center of the galaxy. Dots in the background are other galaxies; colors indicate different radio frequencies.


From ScienceNews.. www.sciencenews.org...



There’s much more to the universe than meets the eye, and a new web-based app lets you explore just how much our eyes are missing. Gleamoscope presents the night sky across a range of electromagnetic frequencies. Spots of gamma rays pinpoint distant feeding black holes. Tendrils of dust glow with infrared light throughout the Milky Way. A supernova remnant — the site of a star that exploded roughly 11,000 years ago — blasts out X-rays and radio waves. Many of these phenomena are nearly imperceptible in visible light. So astronomers use equipment, such as specialized cameras and antennas, that can detect other frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. Computers turn the data into images, often assigning colors to certain frequencies to highlight specific details or physical processes. In Gleamoscope, a slider smoothly transitions the scene from one frequency of light to another, turning the familiar star-filled night sky into a variety of psychedelic landscapes. Pan and magnification controls allow you to scan all around the night sky and zoom in for a closer look. The interactive map combines images from many observatories and includes new data from the Murchison Widefield Array, a network of radio antennas in Australia. Over 300,000 galaxies appear as dots in images of the new radio data, described in an upcoming issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. The radio map by itself can also be explored on mobile devices in a separate app called GLEAM, available on Google Play.



gleamoscope.icrar.org... ( WOW )




Does anyone else think the picture looks like an image of 'sound'?

If it's just me who sees it, it's probably the meds.

ETA: the line of white light reminds me of a graphic equalizer.
edit on 15-11-2016 by doobydoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 12:36 PM
link   
a reply to: skywatcher44

162.75 , 2.55 Gal

whats that ?



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 12:44 PM
link   
a reply to: doobydoll

Well they do say that many aspects of
our reality are based on harmonics.
Our vibration frequency allowing things to be solid.
You know something else I always wondered.
Well Budhhist believe that "OM" is the sound
that created - well - CREATION.
Maybe that's OM.



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 12:50 PM
link   
a reply to: kibric

Galactic Coordinate System..



The first Galactic coordinate system was used by William Herschel in 1785. A number of different coordinate systems, each differing by a few degrees, were used until 1932, when Lund Observatory assembled a set of conversion tables that defined a standard Galactic coordinate system based on a North pole at RA 12h40m, Dec +28° (in the 1900.0 epoch convention) and a 0° longitude at the point where the Galactic plane and the Celestial plane intersected.[1] In 1958 the International Astronomical Union (IAU) defined the galactic coordinate system in reference to radio observations of galactic neutral hydrogen through the hydrogen line, changing the definition of the Galactic longitude by 32° and the latitude by 1.5°.[1] In the equatorial coordinate system, for equinox and equator of 1950.0, the north galactic pole is defined at right ascension 12h 49m, declination +27.4°, in the constellation Coma Berenices, with a probable error of ±0.1°.[2] Longitude 0° is the great semicircle that originates from this point along the line in position angle 123° with respect to the equatorial pole. The galactic longitude increases in the same direction as right ascension. Galactic latitude is positive towards the north galactic pole, the galactic equator being 0°, the poles ±90°.[3] Based on this definition, the galactic poles and equator can be found from spherical trigonometry and can be precessed to other epochs; see the table. Equatorial coordinates B1950.0 / (J2000.0) of galactic reference points[1] right ascension declination constellation north pole (+90° latitude) 12h 49m (12h 51.4m) +27.4° (+27.13°) Coma Berenices south pole (−90° latitude) 0h 49m (0h 51.4m) −27.4° (−27.13°) Sculptor galactic center (0° longitude) 17h 42.4m (17h 45.6m) −28.92° (−28.94°) Sagittarius anti-center (180° longitude) 5h 42.4m (5h 45.6m) +28.92° (+28.94°) Auriga Radio source Sagittarius A*, which is the best physical marker of the true galactic center, is located at 17h 45m 40.0409s, −29° 00' 28.118" (J2000).[2] Rounded to the same number of digits as the table, 17h 45.7m, −29.01° (J2000), there is an offset of about 0.07° from the defined coordinate center, well within the 1958 error estimate of ±0.1°.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 12:55 PM
link   
a reply to: skywatcher44

163.08 , 1.65
162. 58 , 1.78

zoom all the way in
its a.......?
you can't miss it

has 4 spires ?

can't figure how to take a screenshot on chrome

edit on 15-11-2016 by kibric because: boo



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 12:56 PM
link   
a reply to: skywatcher44

This is incredible. Check out Betelgeuse! Looks awesome in visible light. I just love the Orion/horsehead region in general.





It's the big bright star top left-ish of my screen shots.



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:01 PM
link   
a reply to: kibric

The map seems to be distorted the higher or lower on the galactic plane you are looking. Just looks like empty space to me...though the map does indicate "object of unknown nature"

ETA: Scrolling around the map until you get the coordinates you mentioned seems to give different results than just punching in the coordinates in the search function. Here's what I bet you are seeing.


edit on 15-11-2016 by DrumStickNinja because: pic and ETA



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:13 PM
link   
a reply to: DrumStickNinja



yer that's it

???
edit on 15-11-2016 by kibric because: boo



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:17 PM
link   
a reply to: kibric




can't figure how to take a screenshot on chrome


If you have a recent windows PC you can use the snipping tool.

www.capture-screenshot.org...




posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:19 PM
link   
a reply to: skywatcher44

yer got it working. thanks

any idea on what it is ?



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:24 PM
link   
a reply to: kibric

Best guess would be a lens flare from the bright star above it. Or a sweet alien mega structure. Sigh....but probably the former. Looks really cool though.



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:26 PM
link   
a reply to: DrumStickNinja

never seen a lens flare
with tiny squares making up each spires ??

odd



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:27 PM
link   
a reply to: kibric

There seems to be at least seven of those shapes around the Map. Some blue some grey in visible mode.


edit on 15 11 2016 by skywatcher44 because: .



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:28 PM
link   
Awesome sauce!!



posted on Nov, 15 2016 @ 01:28 PM
link   
a reply to: doobydoll

Look at all those galaxies, beautiful!

The image is reminiscent of sound waves, interesting. Nice catch.



new topics

top topics



 
26
<<   2 >>

log in

join