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What is the Most Important Philosophical Question

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posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 04:47 PM
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How's it hangin'?




posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

to the left..



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 05:20 PM
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WHY is reality here anyway?



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 05:25 PM
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There's a series of important questions.

Is there a creator/God?
Is there an afterlife?
What is my purpose here on earth?
Is there a religion, sect or philosophy that is correct or better than the rest?
How do we find happiness, purpose and fulfillment in life?
Does the law of attraction, or any other spiritual exercise, law or process work for real?



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 05:41 PM
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originally posted by: Wang Tang
a reply to: aphilosopher

I am my physical appearance, my physical properties, my memories, others' memories of me, my accomplishments, my failures, my spirit, my name... something like that.

Why is that important?


Of course it's very important. Is there anything you can know better than yourself?

As to what you are? You don't need to describe yourself in those terms. The simplest answer, the most all-encompassing, is that you and I are parts of the whole, outgrowths of it, whatever that might be. One part of a small city within a far greater one.
edit on 14-11-2016 by Talorc because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 05:41 PM
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Humans fear one thing and that is pain and the fear of pain.


The most important philosophical question objectively is what Buddhah sought. How to free ourselves from suffering


There are of course layers of this human conundrum and can be put in other words


Subjectively is what your own heart desires to do, that you only can answer.



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: Wang Tang

Ah, philosophy! So are you asking about the "science of knowing" or "what" the science of knowing believes is relevant?

Yes, philosophy is very good scholarly art. You can cross many boundaries from behavior, to sociology, to animal behavior, to computer science. English literature with their "so much ink spilt on such little notices" often has this existential question. And philosophy can be applied there too! Both to written words and the critics that apply their favorite models upon literature. Knowing about your mind and how it works can be applied to almost anything. Some people really need some schooling in logic. And maybe argument styles (rhetoric).

As for "what questions" are the best... that is totally subjective. Me, got into philosophy to study "artificial intelligence" as it applied to philosophy of mind. I ended up running across Slovaz Jizek and going down the philosophical rabbit hole. Ended up with Minor in the subject. Eastern religion and philosophy is a wonderful subject to study. Lots of great questions there. Even better examples of how not to think!

So, maybe the MOST important question is guided towards self: do I like to learn?

PS - One of my favorites out there is this guy who might the first blogger in the world! Michel de Montaigne. At first, he just started with a few lines here and there. Later in his book, Essays, you meet a fertile and curious mind from the Renaissance. It is still a pleasure to read in modern times.



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 07:19 PM
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I believe the most important question is "what is happening right now, in this very instance?" Once you find the answer to that question you find yourself and are set free.



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 07:20 PM
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originally posted by: Willtell


The most important philosophical question objectively is what Buddhah sought. How to free ourselves from suffering



Once you realize you possess everything you need you become free from the suffering caused by the self. - Nirvana

As long as the mind is focused on material things it will remain in a state of suffering.

Materialism convinces the mind that their is something outside of you that you do not yet posses that will make your life better or happier.

Let go of the material world and you will find everything you need is spiritual and comes from within.

Nirvana is a state of mind that can only be achieved when one is satisfied that everything one needs one already has. If one lacks even 1 thing that one believes one needs, Nirvana is impossible.

This is why Jesus says its easier for a camel to walk through the eye of the needle. Wealthy people have too many things to worry about to be free from suffering. They are more likely to see their material possessions as a source of happiness.



edit on 14-11-2016 by Isurrender73 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: Wang Tang

The most important question... Is the one that you ask yourself right before you decide some questions should not be asked out loud.



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Talorc
Of course it's very important. Is there anything you can know better than yourself?

I wouldn't describe myself in those terms. The simplest and most encompassing answer is that you and I are part of the whole, outgrowths of it, whatever that might be. One part of a small city within a far greater one.


Is there anything I can know better than myself? Of course. My Self is constantly changing and adapting, so it can be hard to keep track of. Knowing myself requires me to take a step back and analyze myself, a potentially difficult task depending on how busy I am, and the size of my ego.

Should there be anything I know better than myself? I feel like that is a more appropriate question.

I think your description of Self is valuable in its simplicity, but lacking in analytic power due to its simplicity. And perhaps that's by design. But personally I think we can do more to describe our Self.



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 07:53 PM
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a reply to: Wang Tang

I had it in college for a final exam. It was great. Awesome in its simplicity and complexity. The only final test question was "WHY?" Not "Why WHAT"? or "Why him, her, it, that"... just "WHY?" A 3 word answer occurred to me in a revelation....

To the question "WHY"? I answered simply "WHY NOT!?" "BECAUSE!" Turned it in and had a dozen regrets that I probably really, really flunked that one. When I got it back...it had a smiley face on it and an A+.

A comment from the prof was insightful: "Life is it's own reward. It doesnt need any deeper meaning other than "To LIVE". Nice Job!"

edit on 14-11-2016 by mysterioustranger because: original formatting flew out the window!



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 07:58 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

It's amazing, the things we can get away with in philosophy exams



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 08:02 PM
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originally posted by: Wang Tang
a reply to: mysterioustranger

It's amazing, the things we can get away with in philosophy exams


lol!

It's not as easy as you think, at least where I got my undergrad degree. I'd have been able to consume much more alcohol if it were. I'm one of those crazy double major guys - BS - CS, BA - Philosophy. And I kinda fell into the double major thing too.

And I was a bartender too to keep myself afloat as my parents weren't rich. Where did all that energy go?


edit on 11/14/2016 by Riffrafter because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: Riffrafter

Haha I'm well aware... had my share of late nights pulling my hairs out trying to put something together. With regards to alcohol... I found that alcohol and good papers often went hand in hand.



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 08:25 PM
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originally posted by: Wang Tang
a reply to: Riffrafter

Haha I'm well aware... had my share of late nights pulling my hairs out trying to put something together. With regards to alcohol... I found that alcohol and good papers often went hand in hand.


Absolutely!

Especially if it was about Nietzsche.

"God is dead - Nietzsche"

"Nietzsche is dead - God"

lol!!



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 08:38 PM
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originally posted by: Wang Tang

originally posted by: Talorc
Of course it's very important. Is there anything you can know better than yourself?

I wouldn't describe myself in those terms. The simplest and most encompassing answer is that you and I are part of the whole, outgrowths of it, whatever that might be. One part of a small city within a far greater one.


Is there anything I can know better than myself? Of course.


What is it then, my self-described philosopher friend?



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 09:01 PM
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I know this will be obscure to many, but what consistently was able to trigger my memory of the eternal realm was Jesus's departing words to Thomas:

The savior said, "Brother Thomas while you have time in the world, listen to me, and I will reveal to you the things you have pondered in your mind.

"Now, since it has been said that you are my twin and true companion, examine yourself, and learn who you are, in what way you exist, and how you will come to be. Since you will be called my brother, it is not fitting that you be ignorant of yourself. And I know that you have understood, because you had already understood that I am the knowledge of the truth. So while you accompany me, although you are uncomprehending, you have (in fact) already come to know, and you will be called 'the one who knows himself'. For he who has not known himself has known nothing, but he who has known himself has at the same time already achieved knowledge about the depth of the all. So then, you, my brother Thomas, have beheld what is obscure to men, that is, what they ignorantly stumble against."

The Book of Thomas the Contender



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: Talorc

Mathematics is an example. The principles of Mathematics are an unchanging truth. You understand a Mathematical concept once, and you fully understand it. Unlike your Self; you may think you understand your Self one day and then you come across a new experience that reveals to you a part of your Self that you had not been aware of.



posted on Nov, 14 2016 @ 09:26 PM
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originally posted by: Wang Tang
a reply to: Talorc

Mathematics is an example. The principles of Mathematics are an unchanging truth. You understand a Mathematical concept once, and you fully understand it. Unlike your Self; you may think you understand your Self one day and then you come across a new experience that reveals to you a part of your Self that you had not been aware of.


Are the principles of your existence not an unchanging truth, then? Are they inconsistent and false only because you weren't aware of them? Why can your existence not be analyzed logically, just like a mathematical equation?

Now, after you've analyzed those principles to understand precisely your place in the world, all else would be perfectly clear.

Now, Mr. Philosopher, I'm sure you know what Thales carved on the wall at Delphi. And you must be aware of that saying by Archimedes: "Give me a place to stand, and I can move the world."

What were they getting at? Once again, it's very simple. The essence of knowledge is self-knowledge.



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