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getting data off partitioned discs failed C drive

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posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 05:41 AM
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I think I am going to have to make a decision about my hard disc which is partitioned. Having a lot pf problems with the windows installer which I thought I had fixed.

I use my D drive to store my data on. If my C drive fails can I still get the data off the D drive?

If so, how exactly do I go about it?

Do I need another hard disc to do it with?

What sort of problems might I encounter.?

The data is also backed up onto an external storage disc

My PC does not have any built in space for a second disc but one may fit underneath the CD drive but electrical short out is a big concern

Thanks to all for their help




edit on 10-11-2016 by Azureblue because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 05:59 AM
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a reply to: Azureblue

hard drive adapter

not sure what you want to do. but if you need to access drive data if you take that hard drive out. you can use the adapter i linked. it will take your hard drive and treat it like a usb hard drive on another computer.

i use it at work to get data off of drives that won't boot or to remove malware/viruses on a pc.



posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 06:03 AM
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a reply to: Azureblue

If your pc has usb3 ports, you could get a compatible external drive. The speed is just as good as sata, if not better on older systems. The other option is to get an ssd and use that as your system drive [ssd's are fully enclosed so less chance of a short, and are small format laptop drive] it can then be mounted in the floppy drive bay if you have one. You can then used the hard drive bay for the data drive.

The former is the simplest solution but the latter comes with the mssive performance boost as a serious bonus. SSD's are getting very cheap now for the smaller sizes, tbh i would go with this option.

edit on 10-11-2016 by kountzero because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 06:05 AM
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a reply to: grey580

Thanks for that. I have two of those cables. I assume they connect white on white and black fittings and the same with the two red cables?



posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 06:51 AM
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IF the drive is dying then its is better to buy a new drive and slap the OS of your choice on it.

The reason for this is that if the drive is dying every disk access could potentially kill a small area which could have what you desperately need.

It's why most IT people mention the word backup which does seem to get most peoples backs up until they see how much professional data recovery costs.

Get a new drive and slap on windows then buy a cheap usb caddy for the old one and pull off what you can. If you're lucky its just the NTFS getting a bit corrupt and no physical damage to the drive so you can use it as a backup drive.

When slapping a new OS on make sure the old drive is disconnected as sod and his law will guarantee you wipe over the old drive (everyones done it at some point
)



posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: Azureblue

SATA cord (inexpensive)...unplug hard drive inside(ribbon adapter)...plug it in USBof another computer...view your drive with the second one...you'll see all your files because YOUR operating system isn't using it...the VIEWING 2nd computer is.

View, drop and drag into 2nd comp. you're viewing on....and save, save to flash or external storage!

Good luck! MS



posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: Azureblue

PS...I've done the SATA thing on another computer at least 3 times successfully since 2000-2001.



posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 01:22 PM
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originally posted by: Azureblue
If my C drive fails can I still get the data off the D drive?


Yep, easily. Another option you can use which I haven't seen mentioned is to install a linux operating system on a flash drive and boot from that in order to access all of your data on your D drive. Linux operating systems are free, so the only cost to you would be the flash drive, if you don't have one laying around. This website gives you a program to install the .iso (linux operating system) file onto the flash drive. Here is a link to download .iso files for a particular linux OS to put on the flash drive.



posted on Nov, 11 2016 @ 01:41 AM
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a reply to: kountzero

thanks for that. I am only vaguely familiar with your suggestions so I will research that so thanks



posted on Nov, 11 2016 @ 01:55 AM
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Thanks for the help people, all good stuff.



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