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Earthquake Felt in Oklahoma and Parts of Kansas, Arkansas, 5.3

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posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 09:11 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: reldra
a reply to: alphabetaone

Ok, I see that now. The answer is probably YES.

Oklahoma has several fault lines. They have had these faults and earthquakes due to those lines for some time .So has Georgia.No frackin here. Why not just post about the earthquake and leave politics out of it ?
The Earth is now in the cooling stage. That means the plates are probably contracting again. They expand as the Earth heats up in summer thus causing a larger number than in winter.
Lets just hope that this all quietens down


Yes faultlines. The daily earthquakes started with fracking.




posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 09:12 PM
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a reply to: alphabetaone

Fracking will never help anyrthing.

It is setting off nearby faultlines. And will cause quakes in other places sooner than naturally ocurring. This will touch Yellowstone, eventually, I guartantee it.
edit on 6-11-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: alphabetaone

Probably not. The New Madrid is at least 600 km east of the epicenter of this quake.

I will say this though, after reviewing the raw data, and seeing felts reports over at EMSC from as far away as Seminole- 1600 km away- I cannot agree with 5.0 either. That propagation distance is too far for 5.0, imo.

And worse, EMSC has this as a 4.9!

Wouldn't be the first time the USGS weekend newbie night time crew screwed it up. I estimate 5.6, at least.



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 09:18 PM
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a reply to: reldra

few property owners sueing the state for damages since they allowing fracking, which scientists said causes seismic events.



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 09:24 PM
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originally posted by: TrueAmerican
a reply to: alphabetaone

Probably not. The New Madrid is at least 600 km east of the epicenter of this quake.

I will say this though, after reviewing the raw data, and seeing felts reports over at EMSC from as far away as Seminole- 1600 km away- I cannot agree with 5.0 either. That propagation distance is too far for 5.0, imo.

And worse, EMSC has this as a 4.9!

Wouldn't be the first time the USGS weekend newbie night time crew screwed it up. I estimate 5.6, at least.


You could be right on that. However, like I said earlier, the 5.7 in 1987 energy was felt and shook as far as Boston because of the geolphysical nature of the plate.

Though I DO agree that 5.0 seems a little on the light side, for the felts.



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 09:33 PM
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originally posted by: reldra
This will touch Yellowstone, eventually, I guartantee it.


It did register at Yellowstone. I checked. And the last time that happened from a quake in OK, it was that 5.8 a while back.

I think the Appalachians may have slowed those waves down here in WNC. Because I was dead still and didn't feel a thing. I seriously got back up from laying down because something told me to, not sure what. But if you've been watching my other thread about the Super Duper moon being here, you'd know I'm a little nervous right now about big quakes happening.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

ETA: Also, just FYI, two stations in the scientific data recorded (automatic) the body wave magnitude of that quake over 6. One was a 6.1, and the other a 6.7! And many over 5.3. I think that one's going to need further review...
edit on Sun Nov 6th 2016 by TrueAmerican because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: reldra

I know it is all subjective but .... 3.1 is not that strong? I've been in 7's, and regularly 5s and 6s. Most people will NOT notice a 3.



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

Glad yo see you here



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

I checked as many places as I know of. But I have the idea Oklahoma's activity will have an effect on the caldera. Glad you know how to check!



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 10:24 PM
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originally posted by: Noinden
a reply to: reldra

I know it is all subjective but .... 3.1 is not that strong? I've been in 7's, and regularly 5s and 6s. Most people will NOT notice a 3.


3.1 was the foreshock. In Oklahoma it is strong. I have been in stronger, but you must look at the depth.



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

I see your thread about the super moon and I raise you a star annd flag



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

dbl
edit on 6-11-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 10:37 PM
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Back in 2009 or 10 I ran into many "official" type people gov't license plates, USGS..? not sure.
I ran into them near the Missouri Arkansas boarder, not far from Yellville, and others near Ponca.
They were taking samples, of sand, yeah sand, in the northern mountains of Ark. I found this odd, but gave it little thought.
I follow and seek out native American artifacts, and attend many events, so I am some what educated on rocks and minerals and such, as flint, magnetite, obsidian, sandstone, and not much else besides, the inclusions, diatoms, and fossils that you learn to hate, that make a nice rock worthless to make a nice knife from...anyways.
These folks, I met stayed near the area I was camping, after a few days, I got to talking to a couple that was not part of the larger group.
They were taking sand and soil samples, following a newly discovered, fault line that lead from the Madrid area, straight across the mountains, MO. ARK. line to KS. and OK. they told me that sand is not normal in the area, or for many huindred miles, and was from sand blows, that only occur during EQ events and much of the samples they had taken were recent, within 10 years of age.
They may have been exaggerating or just trying to scare me, but they insinuated that the fault they were studying would make the Madrid fault look like a dried up mud puddle crack compared to this fault, and that they were directly connected.
This fault and the Madrid fault were actually connected, and likely one would trigger the other when, it happens.
I'm only posting this here because I trust and read TA's posts and it is somewhat on topic beings that it is the same area.
Thanks for reading, sorry for that lack of links, if needed I could give specific cords to the location of the places I ran into these folks.
If you google "watercreek Knapp in" that is where I first noticed them, back in 09 1st week in May.
Then ran into more including the same two I spoke to in 09 next year at Ponca, off down the Buffalo river near Hemned in Hollow. Then later that same year near Cassville, I never seen or found any information from the study or samples that they took, I have looked briefly, but until now never gave it much thought.



posted on Nov, 6 2016 @ 11:26 PM
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originally posted by: Doc Holiday
They were taking sand and soil samples, following a newly discovered, fault line that lead from the Madrid area, straight across the mountains, MO. ARK. line to KS. and OK. they told me that sand is not normal in the area, or for many huindred miles, and was from sand blows, that only occur during EQ events and much of the samples they had taken were recent, within 10 years of age.


Well the problem with that is in order to create sand blows, it is my understanding that the quakes need to be of formidable size to achieve this. And in the last 15 years, I can think of no quakes in that specific area big enough to accomplish that. It is possible they may have thought at the time that the sand came from sand blows, but then upon further inspection found another cause.

Considering I see no data for any such fault- unless I've missed it- that's probably the case. Unless it is still being researched, and probably heavily if they suspect a fault that large- before releasing any info.

But that sure is interesting.


They may have been exaggerating or just trying to scare me, but they insinuated that the fault they were studying would make the Madrid fault look like a dried up mud puddle crack compared to this fault, and that they were directly connected. This fault and the Madrid fault were actually connected, and likely one would trigger the other when, it happens.


Well kind of, yeah. If the fault's that long, we're talking anywhere between 500 and 1000 km. That's big. Like seriously big. 8.5+'s big. But curiously, you'd think they would have found evidence of any triggering by now from the 1811-1812 quakes. I don't know of any, but I can't be sure. There's a zillion scientific documents out there...



posted on Nov, 7 2016 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: reldra

Ok look at where I am from (under my icon) New Zealand.... We know earthquakes.



posted on Nov, 7 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: Noinden

Depends on the depth of the earthquake,I've felt 3's that really shook the house,I've felt 5's that feel less then the 3 because was deep,but by fracking your creating voids,which will need to be filled back in,either by a private party,or it will do it itself,.then you'll see destruction



posted on Nov, 7 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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Frackin' earthquakes....
I live north of St Louis in the very tip of the Ozark Mts, in a Karst Preservation District. The area is rife with losing streams, sinkholes, caves, etc. By the way, when STL had 9 inches of rain in 24 hours this spring, our losing stream swept all ours away. It was something to see.
Anyway, we felt nothing from Oklahoma. But 6 weeks or so ago, some sort of seismic shift made an entire built in pantry fail. Every shelf collapsed. I suspect our area is on a different plate than the rest of the area.
And during the test fracking in Arkansas (when people were lighting their sink water on fire), I was physically ill daily from the tremors. Thank GOD for ATS. I searched it out and found a whole community dealing with what I was dealing with.
Within the past month, the vast caverns that store a LOT of natural gas have started to smell. These salt domes are supposed to be a safe way to store gas. I am calling the gas company today to begin making a pest of myself.
Locally, we have quarries on the banks of the river that do blasting whenever. I keep wondering about blasting plus karst shift plus fracking tremors. How will that change the landscape? Our little area also has many oil pipelines.

To give you some idea of the ground, our area has no sewage, city water or gas for homes. It is just too dicey.
Now, how many areas like ours are dotting the country?

My personal opinion is that fracking is a quick way to ruin topography. Ground is sturdy until it isn't. And you cannot predict what little thing can set off a chain reaction. Did our pantry collapse because months ago our losing stream swallowed the rain from an entire 15 mile area?



posted on Nov, 7 2016 @ 09:36 AM
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originally posted by: katfish
Frackin' earthquakes....
I live north of St Louis in the very tip of the Ozark Mts, in a Karst Preservation District. The area is rife with losing streams, sinkholes, caves, etc. By the way, when STL had 9 inches of rain in 24 hours this spring, our losing stream swept all ours away. It was something to see.


That HAD to be a disheartening sight, I'm sorry
Yea I hate seeing things like this happen that were otherwise avoidable.



Anyway, we felt nothing from Oklahoma.


That's actually not too surprising and I'm guessing you're grateful you didn't!



But 6 weeks or so ago, some sort of seismic shift made an entire built in pantry fail. Every shelf collapsed. I suspect our area is on a different plate than the rest of the area.


Nope, you don't. The contiguous 48 states all sit atop the North American Plate. But, if the New Madrid Fault were to split (highly unlikely...and I mean highly) then you would reside on your own island




And during the test fracking in Arkansas (when people were lighting their sink water on fire), I was physically ill daily from the tremors. Thank GOD for ATS. I searched it out and found a whole community dealing with what I was dealing with.
Within the past month, the vast caverns that store a LOT of natural gas have started to smell. These salt domes are supposed to be a safe way to store gas. I am calling the gas company today to begin making a pest of myself.
Locally, we have quarries on the banks of the river that do blasting whenever. I keep wondering about blasting plus karst shift plus fracking tremors. How will that change the landscape? Our little area also has many oil pipelines.


wow! I honestly feel for you, that's a lot to have to deal with in addition to normal daily life issues. I don't think any of us can accurately predict what the long-term effects to the landscape are going to be. We can hypothesize, but as always, mother nature will do as she sees fit to do.




My personal opinion is that fracking is a quick way to ruin topography. Ground is sturdy until it isn't. And you cannot predict what little thing can set off a chain reaction. Did our pantry collapse because months ago our losing stream swallowed the rain from an entire 15 mile area?


I think it's a foregone conclusion that in some fashion or another, fracking will ruin the landscape, yes. The degree to which it does though, has yet to be seen.

Just to play a little devil's advocate here: Or, did your pantry collapse because there was an instability in the materials that only presented itself under the proper conditions causing it to collapse?
edit on 7-11-2016 by alphabetaone because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2016 @ 10:53 AM
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Here is an article from back in September of 2016 regarding a new fault line discovered in Oklahoma.
theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com...
Finding and mapping these faults is expensive.

I think the oil companies knew of these faults many years ago, but they don't share there findings.

Atkinson, an Oil geologist, bought earthquake insurance back in 1952. Which back then was pretty much unheard of except in California.
fivethirtyeight.com...
edit on 7-11-2016 by crappiekat because: to add

edit on 7-11-2016 by crappiekat because: (no reason given)


Just to add: I know this information has been mentioned here at ATS before. (It's in the archives, just can't find it) I just wanted to bring it up again in case some folk haven't found it.
edit on 7-11-2016 by crappiekat because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 7 2016 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: Oldtimer2

I said it was subjective. I've been in a shallow 7, and I've been in a deep high 6s. Yes they feel different (very). New Zealand is as shakey if not more so than CA, so we get used to it. Hence ...subjective. It also will depend on building codes. I lived in Milwaukee for a number of years, that city (and most Midwest ones) would not deal will with any sort of earthquake.




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