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Whats on the other side of a blackhole?

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posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 04:26 AM
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Hey everyone, If blackholes do exist and they suck all matter and light inside them what happens to them? are they taken to another dimension or are they just crushed? if so surely the crushed mass must exist somewhere?




posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 04:52 AM
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My theory is that mass drawn into a blackhole, becomes the ejecta which creates another universe. This ejecta from a massive black hole, may explain the creation of our universe, general credited to a big bang.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 05:42 AM
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I think its being used as fuel for the black hole to exist. If i recall correctly, matter can be converted to energie (e=mc2?....)



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 05:50 AM
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The most likely theory to date goes as follows:

As matter falls into a black hole it adds to the mass of the singularity and creates a general "mush" of mass/energy.

Over time this mass/energy is put back into our own universe through gamma burst from the singularities poles and through hawking radiation.

Evenetually black holes evaporate (if they don't have a continuous suppply of fresh matter) through these methods of expelling mass/energy.

Black holes do not violate mass/energy conservation nor do they remove things from our universe. They either continue to account for all the mass that has fallen into them or they radiate it back out in one form or the other.

There is no direct evidence, but the gravity of a black hole might open wormholes (rips in space-time). However, this is more sci-fi than science for now.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 05:53 AM
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Nothing can ever enter a black hole, it gets 'chewed' apart by the immense gravity at the event horizon. Anything that appears to enter a black hole, actually got very close and was shredded into component sub atomic particles, like x-rays, gamma rays, and radio 'noise' that can be heard coming from the black hole itself. This process has been observed and is referred to as a 'burp.'

If something were to enter the black hole, actually make it past the event horizon, it would probably be ejected into the dimension underlaying our own because the thing could not escape the gravity of the hole to exit the way it came, and could not remain in the black hole because of the displacement it would cause (imagine a bubble at the bottom of the ocean), so it must be ejected out, across the membrane that separates dimensions. It's possible that the 'burp' we observe is actually the ripple resulting from the 'crossing over' process.

Perhaps in the next dimension, black holes are fountains, whereas in ours they are drains.

Black holes are in some ways just the opposite of suns. Suns combine lighter elements to make heavier ones through immense heat. Black holes take in complex matter and reduce it to its component pieces. One is the universe's factory, the other its garbage disposal.

In the end, you should read "A Brief History of Time." That guy is way smarter than anyone on ATS.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 06:12 AM
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In the end, you should read "A Brief History of Time." That guy is way smarter than anyone on ATS.



how do you know Hawking is not on ATS?



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 07:01 AM
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Its a trick question people...

What's on the other side of a black hole? The same black hole of course.




posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 07:05 AM
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I have this theory that it's where all those things we "lose" over the years go to.
You know, all those odd socks that disappear somewhere between the laundry basket and the dryer. Things we are adamant we left on the shelf inside the front door only a couple of days ago that have now gone



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 07:40 AM
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Inside the core is as dense as matter density is possible. You would not be able to sense it under any conditions known, only be a pathetic injection into its horizon once in the vicinity.
It is believed that hawking radiation over time allows matter in the form of energy photons to dissipate from the black hole.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 07:44 AM
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Black holes have no "other side". They only have a center. A singularity. A point where all laws of physics break down, therefore we could never know what it is actually like there because we cannot observe it. Nothing can escape the singularity, and nothing can be measured. Only its surroundings.

If you want to believe another universe exists there...go ahead, but you have no proof.

If you want to believe it is a wormhole, go ahead, more likely, but you have no proof.

If you want to believe that the center is a chicken, go ahead, but you again, have no proof.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 08:23 AM
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could the other side of a blackhole be a whitehole?



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 09:41 AM
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Originally posted by noctu
could the other side of a blackhole be a whitehole?


I suppose it could......


But it could also be a chicken.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 09:48 AM
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I wuz thinkin' more like an A%@hole...

Well, what goes in must come out again somewhere



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 09:55 AM
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It's theorized that objects can fall into a Supermassive Black Hole intact, as long as it has no spin relative to the approaching object. Of course, after that they would break up fairly quickly as they approach the singularity. Many people don't realize it, but standing on the earth, our heads feel a lesser gravitational force than our feet. On earth, this difference is nominal. But near a black hole, these forces are increased. Black holes that reach a certian enormity are believed to have a good deal of distance between the event horizon and the singularity within. Once an object passes the event horizon, it cannot escape, but it need not disentigrate immediately. The closer one gets to a black hole, the greater the gravitational difference between his/her head and feet. This is the point where gravity begins to sheer matter apart. Additionally, if there were any gasses or dust whatsoever around the black hole, they would be accelerated to incredible speeds as they approached. They would abrase anything close to them into dust long before it was anywhere close to the black hole.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 04:30 PM
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The material gets tretched out until even its atoms break apart. Of course, this is speculation, because we've never witnessed such an event.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 04:45 PM
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Originally posted by noctu
could the other side of a blackhole be a whitehole?



kind of like the 8-track version of infinity - or the yin yang symbol, now dark, now light, a passage thru time and space....



.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 04:58 PM
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I think the lot of you should back up this thread and read Quest's answer. It was a damn good one, and is pretty scientifically accurate.



posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 05:21 PM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
I think the lot of you should back up this thread and read Quest's answer. It was a damn good one, and is pretty scientifically accurate.



Gotcha. ...Stop talking, speculating, and delving into the poetry of the infinite everyone. The question has been answered. Discussion is over. Move along now.





posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
Gotcha. ...Stop talking, speculating, and delving into the poetry of the infinite everyone. The question has been answered. Discussion is over. Move along now.


Actually, I was just pointing out Quest's answer to the question, which has seemingly gone unnoticed. But hey, who wants to know what the scientific answer is and discuss that?


E_T

posted on Jan, 25 2005 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
Anything that appears to enter a black hole, actually got very close and was shredded into component sub atomic particles, like x-rays, gamma rays, and radio 'noise' that can be heard coming from the black hole itself.
Blackhole itself doesn't send electromagnetic radiation because inside event horizon escape velocity is bigger than speed of light.
It's accretion disk which sends very strong highly energetic radiation.
And matter in accretion disk sends radiation just because pressure and temperature are huge. (all matter emits em radiation whose strength and peak wavelength depends on matter's temperature)



Originally posted by spike
It's theorized that objects can fall into a Supermassive Black Hole intact, as long as it has no spin relative to the approaching object. Of course, after that they would break up fairly quickly as they approach the singularity. Many people don't realize it, but standing on the earth, our heads feel a lesser gravitational force than our feet. On earth, this difference is nominal. But near a black hole, these forces are increased. Black holes that reach a certian enormity are believed to have a good deal of distance between the event horizon and the singularity within. Once an object passes the event horizon, it cannot escape, but it need not disentigrate immediately. The closer one gets to a black hole, the greater the gravitational difference between his/her head and feet.
That's right.

Force shredding matter to pieces is same which causes tides.
And like someone of you might know sun's gravity affects to earth with much bigger force than that caused by moon but because diameter of earth ("distance between head and toes") is much smaller part of total distance to sun tidal force caused by sun is much smaller even though its gravity controls earth's movement in orbit.


And in case of black hole cause of gravity is always "point" (singularity) with infinite density, so no matter how much it has mass it still stays as "point". But because bigger mass means bigger gravity distance to event horizon, "border" where escape velocity exceeds speed of light, increases meaning also that tidal forces near event horizon decrease. (distance between "head and toes" is smaller compared to distance between object and source of gravity)


The force of gravity varies inversly with the distance from the object (ie. it gets weaker the further away you are), so the part of the Earth closest to the Moon is pulled towards it slightly more than the centre, while the part furthest away is pulled towards it slightly less.
curious.astro.cornell.edu...

hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...


Now when talking this, it also affects in our own solar system and some of you might remember "Roche limit", distance where tidal force exceeds force keeping object in one piece (gravity of its mass) breaking it to pieces. Good example is Shoemaker-Levy 9 which crossed its Roche limit around jupiter and breaked to pieces. (later colliding with Jupiter)



The Roche limit is the distance within which a celestial body held together only by its own gravity will disintegrate due to a second celestial body's tidal forces exceeding the first body's gravitational self-attraction. Inside the Roche limit, orbiting material will tend to disperse and form rings, while outside the limit, material will tend to coalesce.
en.wikipedia.org...



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