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MIT produces an interactive Clinton Networks website... see the connections visually.

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posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 06:23 PM
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This is pretty damn awesome... not only can you go and see either Podesta or Clinton mails, but you can get a sense of the affiliations between the various people.
Click on a circle and all the mails connected to that person will be available on the side to click and read.

My hat is off!


clinton.media.mit.edu...




posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: flice

Oh, this is cool! Now I'm gonna be up all night!
Great find!!




posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 06:58 PM
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These are all emails sent by Hillary? Or a mix of received and sent? This is crazy either way! Wonder if there is any gold in there no one has dug up.



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 07:01 PM
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originally posted by: DeadCat
These are all emails sent by Hillary? Or a mix of received and sent? This is crazy either way! Wonder if there is any gold in there no one has dug up.


Not all of them unfortunately... dunno why, MIT will have to answer that, but yeah, you can sift through and get a nice overview of who knew who and contacted who through who.

Pisses me off those clinton mails with 90% redacted pdf's... what's the point of "releasing" those (from state side I mean).
Never got that to be honest.... "Sure you can have that email... just let me fill it with black marker before I give it to you."



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 07:08 PM
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a reply to: flice


Questions and Answers

1. What data sources do you use?
Our data is entirely sourced from WikiLeaks, and was last updated on Sun Oct 30, 2016. In particular, we used the Hillary Clinton Email Archive, The Podesta Emails, and the DNC Email Archive.

2. How do you construct these networks?
For all three networks, nodes (a.k.a. circles) are people and links (a.k.a. lines) between nodes indicate that two people were on a common e-mail thread. The size of a node shows the number of e-mail threads in which a person participated. The size of a link denotes the number of shared e-mail threads between two people. Each node is algorithmically assigned to a community (a group with a disproportionately large number of links among them), which is shown by node color.

3. Why did you create this tool?
At the MIT Media Lab Macro Connections group, we build tools to transform data into stories. ClintonCircle was not created to visualize these emails, but it is a fork of a tool called Immersion that we launched in 2013 and that helps people visualize and understand the networks they weave through email interactions.
Some of the other tools we have built include the Observatory of Economic Complexity, which is the world’s leading site visualizing international trade data, Pantheon, a project exploring our species collective memory, and DataUSA, the most comprehensive visualization of US Public Data. We build all of these tools to improve people’s ability to understand and explore data, and to democratize the benefits of data exploration and visualization.

4. Who is ClintonCircle built for?
This tool is designed for anyone that would like to more easily explore the Hillary Clinton Email Archive, The Podesta Emails, and the DNC Email Archive.

5. Can the media and TV use the images and interactives from ClintonCircle?
Yes.

6. Who are you?
Our team is composed of Kevin Hu and Jingxian Zhang (graduate students at the Macro Connections group at The MIT Media Lab), and led by Professor César Hidalgo.
Kevin Hu is a doctoral candidate working on tools for accessible data visualization and analysis. Jingxian Zhang is a masters student creating e-mail network visualization tools for organizations. Professor César Hidalgo, PhD, is the Principal Investigator and Director of the Macro Connections group at the MIT Media Lab.
We thank Jeremy Rubin for helping formulate the initial idea, and Daniel Smilkov and Deepak Jagdish for working on the original version of Immersion.


I'd like to buy this awesome bunch of brainiacs a round of drinks, their feat is a great contribution to online referencing of Wikileaks emails.

I would consider this site a very good source for email verification against other online claims pertaining to Wikileaks emails.
edit on 2-11-2016 by Sublimecraft because: added more



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: flice

Waayyyy cool!!!

Thanks!



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 07:19 PM
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It's a very cool representation however has anyone seen any trends from it?



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 07:24 PM
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Awesome presentation graphically.. i have seen similar graphics for networks etc

I find the US elections very exciting in a crazy end of the world sort of way


lol i would vote Trump by the way



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 07:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sublimecraft
a reply to: flice


Questions and Answers

1. What data sources do you use?
Our data is entirely sourced from WikiLeaks, and was last updated on Sun Oct 30, 2016. In particular, we used the Hillary Clinton Email Archive, The Podesta Emails, and the DNC Email Archive.

2. How do you construct these networks?
For all three networks, nodes (a.k.a. circles) are people and links (a.k.a. lines) between nodes indicate that two people were on a common e-mail thread. The size of a node shows the number of e-mail threads in which a person participated. The size of a link denotes the number of shared e-mail threads between two people. Each node is algorithmically assigned to a community (a group with a disproportionately large number of links among them), which is shown by node color.

3. Why did you create this tool?
At the MIT Media Lab Macro Connections group, we build tools to transform data into stories. ClintonCircle was not created to visualize these emails, but it is a fork of a tool called Immersion that we launched in 2013 and that helps people visualize and understand the networks they weave through email interactions.
Some of the other tools we have built include the Observatory of Economic Complexity, which is the world’s leading site visualizing international trade data, Pantheon, a project exploring our species collective memory, and DataUSA, the most comprehensive visualization of US Public Data. We build all of these tools to improve people’s ability to understand and explore data, and to democratize the benefits of data exploration and visualization.

4. Who is ClintonCircle built for?
This tool is designed for anyone that would like to more easily explore the Hillary Clinton Email Archive, The Podesta Emails, and the DNC Email Archive.

5. Can the media and TV use the images and interactives from ClintonCircle?
Yes.

6. Who are you?
Our team is composed of Kevin Hu and Jingxian Zhang (graduate students at the Macro Connections group at The MIT Media Lab), and led by Professor César Hidalgo.
Kevin Hu is a doctoral candidate working on tools for accessible data visualization and analysis. Jingxian Zhang is a masters student creating e-mail network visualization tools for organizations. Professor César Hidalgo, PhD, is the Principal Investigator and Director of the Macro Connections group at the MIT Media Lab.
We thank Jeremy Rubin for helping formulate the initial idea, and Daniel Smilkov and Deepak Jagdish for working on the original version of Immersion.


I'd like to buy this awesome bunch of brainiacs a round of drinks, their feat is a great contribution to online referencing of Wikileaks emails.

I would consider this site a very good source for email verification against other online claims pertaining to Wikileaks emails.


Nice job looking this up! I was wondering how they went about creating such a critical tool helping to piece together all the madness!
edit on America/ChicagoWednesdayAmerica/Chicago11America/Chicago1130pmWednesday7 by elementalgrove because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 08:04 PM
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Maybe this website will assist the DOJ & Loretta Lynch in seeing the corruption and collusion.

Oh wait, the DOJ & Loretta Lynch are part of the corruption and collusion.

These people (corrupt government officials) make the Chicago mob jealous!

Oh wait, a lot of these corrupt government officials originated from Chicago.



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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Ohh what tangled web they weave!



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 09:06 PM
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As a cloud architect and big data sientist, I'm especially interested to learn the method they used to create this. If this was all done programmatically, then I'm very impressed.



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 11:56 PM
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Wow, nice work and even props on the effort of putting that together. Surely it will serve as a display of corrupt elements if just anything at this point as I'm still skeptical of her being held accountable.



posted on Nov, 3 2016 @ 12:14 AM
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Good find OP.....As painful and boring a nasty this whole election is, it is also keeping a morbid kind of entertainment to it.....I will be very interested to see what comes of this....



posted on Nov, 3 2016 @ 01:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: Sublimecraft
a reply to: flice


Questions and Answers

1. What data sources do you use?
Our data is entirely sourced from WikiLeaks, and was last updated on Sun Oct 30, 2016. In particular, we used the Hillary Clinton Email Archive, The Podesta Emails, and the DNC Email Archive.

2. How do you construct these networks?
For all three networks, nodes (a.k.a. circles) are people and links (a.k.a. lines) between nodes indicate that two people were on a common e-mail thread. The size of a node shows the number of e-mail threads in which a person participated. The size of a link denotes the number of shared e-mail threads between two people. Each node is algorithmically assigned to a community (a group with a disproportionately large number of links among them), which is shown by node color.

3. Why did you create this tool?
At the MIT Media Lab Macro Connections group, we build tools to transform data into stories. ClintonCircle was not created to visualize these emails, but it is a fork of a tool called Immersion that we launched in 2013 and that helps people visualize and understand the networks they weave through email interactions.
Some of the other tools we have built include the Observatory of Economic Complexity, which is the world’s leading site visualizing international trade data, Pantheon, a project exploring our species collective memory, and DataUSA, the most comprehensive visualization of US Public Data. We build all of these tools to improve people’s ability to understand and explore data, and to democratize the benefits of data exploration and visualization.

4. Who is ClintonCircle built for?
This tool is designed for anyone that would like to more easily explore the Hillary Clinton Email Archive, The Podesta Emails, and the DNC Email Archive.

5. Can the media and TV use the images and interactives from ClintonCircle?
Yes.

6. Who are you?
Our team is composed of Kevin Hu and Jingxian Zhang (graduate students at the Macro Connections group at The MIT Media Lab), and led by Professor César Hidalgo.
Kevin Hu is a doctoral candidate working on tools for accessible data visualization and analysis. Jingxian Zhang is a masters student creating e-mail network visualization tools for organizations. Professor César Hidalgo, PhD, is the Principal Investigator and Director of the Macro Connections group at the MIT Media Lab.
We thank Jeremy Rubin for helping formulate the initial idea, and Daniel Smilkov and Deepak Jagdish for working on the original version of Immersion.


I'd like to buy this awesome bunch of brainiacs a round of drinks, their feat is a great contribution to online referencing of Wikileaks emails.

I would consider this site a very good source for email verification against other online claims pertaining to Wikileaks emails.


perhaps it may serve as an alternate source for anything wikileaks-and-clinton-related here, since we can't link to wikileaks directly.

as long as they'll keep it updated.
edit on 3/11/2016 by jedi_hamster because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2016 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: flice

I imagine this will be a very useful tool for the FBI in their investigations into Clinton, Obama, Huma, Podesta, etc.

Surely the Clinton camp is already trying to figure out a way to remove this from the internet.



posted on Nov, 3 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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Nice format regardless of topic



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