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The GOPs Age of Authoritarianism Has Only Begun - New York Magazine

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posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:35 AM
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This article gives a really fulsome historical perspective on the current state of the GOP.

I had realized about a month or so ago, that rather than Trump representing the "death" of the Republcian Party ... he really represents a new beginning. It seems others share my conclusion:



Approaching the 2016 election from this historical perspective, in which Trump’s every boast, tweet, and threat disappears into the ether, may at first blush sound like a relief. It is the opposite. Trump is an extreme event, but Trumpism is no fluke. Its weaknesses are fleeting, and its strengths likely to endure. Far from an organization that is “probably headed toward a civil war” — as the Washington Post recently put it, summing up a rapidly congealing consensus — the Republican Party is instead more unified than one might imagine, as well as more dangerous. The accommodations its leaders have made to their erratic and delirious nominee underscore a capacity to go further and lower to maintain their grip on power than anybody understood. More consequentially, the horrors Trump has unleashed are the product of tectonic forces in American politics. Trump has revealed the convergence of two movements more extreme than anything in the free world that may yet threaten the democratic character most Americans take as their birthright.


Of course, a good portion of you will agree that Trump is an amazing force but disagree that the net effect of what he represents is more dangerous to the historical Republic than anything seen in our lifetimes, and certainly more dangerous than one old lady in a pantsuit that is a center-right war hawk.

I've placed this in the Mud Pit not to encourage the insults and garbage posts we've seen so many of lately, but merely so that ATS members can feel free to speak their minds without limitations of "political baiting" that limits other forums.

Feel free to represent your side as passionately as you wish, but please... for the sake of discussion, try to keep the gutter-snipe insults against each other to a minimum. (If you will.)




That the contemporary Republican Party shares a name with the Republican Party of the 1970s — or even of the ’80s or ’90s — has created massive confusion over just how distinct its worldview is. According to one measure of ideology used widely by political scientists, the most conservative Republican in the House 25 years ago, when the House attacked a Republican president for the heresy of increasing taxes, would be among the most liberal House Republicans today. “I’m a conservative from the conservative wing of the conservative movement,” Speaker of the House Paul Ryan said earlier this year, marveling at how he has become a mainstream figure among his peers. “I was always kind of a bomb-thrower from the right … it just shows you that we have shifted the center far to the right, in a good way.” Still, as the conservative movement has completed its conquest of the Republican Party, it has never resolved the dilemma that haunted it from the beginning. Conservative opposition to policies like business regulation, social insurance, and progressive taxation has never taken hold among anything resembling a majority of the public.


I know that we've had arguments about the changing roles of the two parties in the last century, but this is one of the best descriptions of what I see shifting in the GOP that I have seen.



The party has grown increasingly reliant upon white identity politics to supply its votes, which has left an indelible imprint on not only the Republican Party’s function but also its form. Right-wing populism has had the same character for decades — in 1950, Theodor Adorno described the fear of outsiders, and the veneration of law and order, as “the authoritarian personality”; in 1964, Richard Hofstadter described a similar tendency as “the paranoid style” — but until recently, those movements lived outside both political parties. The political scientists Jonathan Weiler and Marc Hetherington found that, as recently as 1992, the Republican and Democratic parties had an equal proportion of voters with an authoritarian personality. By Obama’s first term, authoritarian personalities identified overwhelmingly with the GOP. In its preference for simplicity over complexity, and its disdain for experts and facts, the party has steadily ratcheted down its standard of intellectually acceptable discourse: from a doddering Ronald Reagan to Dan Quayle to George W. Bush to Sarah Palin. From this standpoint, Trump is less a freakish occurrence than something close to an inevitability.


I stated, somewhere early on, that Trump perfectly reflects the "true self" of the modern Republican party. Rampant sexism, racism, homophobia and religious bigotry (toward anything not Fundamentalist Christian).

So, what say you ATS? Discuss the meat and potatoes?

... or fling more poo?
edit on 1-11-2016 by Gryphon66 because: Noted




posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:42 AM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66
Source

This article gives a really fulsome historical perspective on the current state of the GOP.

I had realized about a month or so ago, that rather than Trump representing the "death" of the Republcian Party ... he really represents a new beginning. It seems others share my conclusion:



The GOP obstructionist Congress - - - certainly made its mark.

But, Trump as their leader? Unfortunately, I can see it.



Of course he was narcissistic. That's why he made people believe in him the way he believed in himself. He had the exact traits of a narcissistic person, he loved himself more than anything, he always blamed others for his own actions, he never felt guilty about anything. He wanted to be worshipped, he was extremely manipulative, did not care about one's feelings. All he cared about was power and greed. That's a typical narcissistic person.


The above is an answer to the question: Was Hitler a narcissist.

www.quora.com...


+7 more 
posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:47 AM
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I agree 100%....we've always had people in America like Trump, but what we haven't had such a large group of voters agreeing to every B.S. rant that comes out of his mouth....to me, that's the scary part....since Trump has won his primary, I've went back and read Mein Kampf.....there are so many similarities to mid-1930's Germany that's it is chilling to me.
edit on 1-11-2016 by jimmyx because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: Annee

The article addresses the phenomenon of "the Great Man" in relation to the GOP and to Trump. Sociology and political science often speak of a "cult of personality."

I think there's no question that's a big, big portion of what is going on with Donald J. Trump.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:50 AM
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originally posted by: jimmyx
I agree 100%....we've always had people in America like Trump, but what we haven't had such a large group of voters agreeing to every B.S. rant that comes out of his mouth....to me, that's the scary part....since Trump has won his primary, I've went back and read Mein Kampf.....there are so many similarities to mid-1930's Germany that's it is chilling to me.


Similarities yes, but unfortunately at this point, we have Godwin's Law ... what we can say, without question, is that Trump represents the same political forces that every Strong Authoritarian political movement has embodied.

I personally think it's 100x worse than Mr. Hitler; Hitler only wanted Europe for Germany.
edit on 1-11-2016 by Gryphon66 because: Noted



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:51 AM
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"And what rough beast, it's hour come round at last slouches toward Bethlehem to be born.''


+34 more 
posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:52 AM
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Meanwhile, in reality, our universities are churning out left wing authoritarians like hot cakes.


+17 more 
posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: jimmyx
I agree 100%....we've always had people in America like Trump, but what we haven't had such a large group of voters agreeing to every B.S. rant that comes out of his mouth....to me, that's the scary part....since Trump has won his primary, I've went back and read Mein Kampf.....there are so many similarities to mid-1930's Germany that's it is chilling to me.


Have you read mein kampf???

Hitler's fascism involved total nationalization of industry(Krupp steel for example), complete governmental control over healthcare(with euthanasia panels), control over what cars to drive, how municipal resources should be acquitted(water, electricity, etc.), a progressive surrendering of earnings(taxes) to the greater good of the empire, and who should breed and to what extent...

Now who does that sound like??

-Christosterone



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:52 AM
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Hitler only wanted Europe for Germany.

Ah, that was the reason for the Afrika Feldzug then?



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Annee

The article addresses the phenomenon of "the Great Man" in relation to the GOP and to Trump. Sociology and political science often speak of a "cult of personality."

I think there's no question that's a big, big portion of what is going on with Donald J. Trump.


Glanced it, re-reading now.

The scary part is not Trump, but those falling for it. "Trump Cultists".

How many times have we heard: "How could people follow Hitler?" "How could people let it happen?"

Today we're seeing how.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

EDIT: Hope I didn't derail your thread. I just couldn't get past the comparison.


edit on 1-11-2016 by Annee because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:55 AM
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I'd be more worried that the DNC now riots and tears up communities for supporting a candidate in the GOP. Figured I'd add my food for thought since were spreading fear.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: TheBulk
Meanwhile, in reality, our universities are churning out left wing authoritarians like hot cakes.


no....that's your opinion, your reality....remember that one of the groups that the brown shirts went after were the highly educated....they demonized them to the point that the rest of the population actually believed them, and they too were put in camps...



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 12:06 PM
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Probably the most accurate part of the article:


Just because the conservative movement will face long odds attracting a plurality of American voters doesn’t mean that those odds are zero. This year, Clinton has had the luxury of competing against a candidate who does not hide his grossness. In 2020, she will probably encounter a candidate who uses dog whistles rather than air horns and is trying to build a majority rather than a brand. Republicans won’t necessarily need to moderate their plans to beat her in 2020. To compete, they may only need Trumpism with a human face (and, perhaps, human hair as well).


Other than that, I don't think the article gives enough credit to Obama for Trump's success. When he ran in 2008, he was relatively unknown. After the broken promises and outright lies, he lost the support of many people who gave him the benefit of the doubt. Everyone knows Hillary Clinton is a liar, even she has admitted that. She will not get the blind support of the people who voted for Obama because of the color of his skin.

I also find it ironic that a news organization based in New York City complains about Republican authoritarianism.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: jimmyx


brown shirts went after were the highly educated

Only this time, they will not be 'brown shirts' they will be 'red caps'



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: Gryphon66

I personally think it's 100x worse than Mr. Hitler; Hitler only wanted Europe for Germany.


That is scary.

I am a Globalist. But, I consider myself an "Intelligent, Progressive, Equal Opportunity" Globalist. Not an authoritarian one.

One that brings Science/Scientists together as One to protect/improve the Whole. One World - - not NWO.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: Christosterone

originally posted by: jimmyx
I agree 100%....we've always had people in America like Trump, but what we haven't had such a large group of voters agreeing to every B.S. rant that comes out of his mouth....to me, that's the scary part....since Trump has won his primary, I've went back and read Mein Kampf.....there are so many similarities to mid-1930's Germany that's it is chilling to me.


Have you read mein kampf???

Hitler's fascism involved total nationalization of industry(Krupp steel for example), complete governmental control over healthcare(with euthanasia panels), control over what cars to drive, how municipal resources should be acquitted(water, electricity, etc.), a progressive surrendering of earnings(taxes) to the greater good of the empire, and who should breed and to what extent...

Now who does that sound like??

-Christosterone


nobody in this day and age
edit on 1-11-2016 by jimmyx because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 12:09 PM
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It's truly amazing how both the left and the right can both honestly perceive the other side to be the enemy in so many of the same ways.

We need more centrists.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 12:10 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

It could be said from the lens of Identity politics that the GOP is engaging in identity politics, but without that lens, and without the framing of the story by identitarians, that story turns out to be quite false. I don't hear the GOP using the language and terms of identity politics, unless they are forced to by the media, or unless they are cornered into doing so because the Dems are framing the debate that way. If the GOP appeals to some generic "white voter", that is one thing, but the idea that they are actively campaigning for "white voters" and white votes, is nonsensical.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 12:19 PM
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This is another in the stories that we are seeing come out as an act of desperation by the Hillary camp. They haven't had much luck pushing the 'oh there's nothing to these emails', so they are pushing end of the world as we know it stories.
Another one is that the Kremlin is ruining our democratic election.

I don't really care.
I want to see the Republicans fall and I want the same thing to happen to the Democrats.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 12:19 PM
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originally posted by: VictorVonDoom

Other than that, I don't think the article gives enough credit to Obama for Trump's success. When he ran in 2008, he was relatively unknown. After the broken promises and outright lies, he lost the support of many people who gave him the benefit of the doubt.


Every president loses a percentage of "Dreamers" that are not realistic about the job of president and what the president can and can not do.

Then you have the opposing "Dreamers" making up lies and unrealistic claims.

------------------------------------------------------------

Back on subject: GREAT MAN THEORY.


edit on 1-11-2016 by Annee because: (no reason given)



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