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The Moon - Incredible Lunar Views From The Japanese SELENE Orbiter - Earthrise

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posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:09 AM
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This has just been released I think HD video of the Moon and an earthrise.
I think the video is on a live loop...as in it is a loop being played over and over on the channel.

It's blown me away.



en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 1-11-2016 by TheKnightofDoom because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

That's cool.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:20 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

Where are all the moon bases and crystal structures?
...oh wait they must have been edited out.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

Here is what happened to her in 2009.



Took their time releasing it. More info here.


global.jaxa.jp...



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:27 AM
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That second video got me thinking.
Does anyone know were to get some hi-res photos of areas on the moon. I woulds need at least 2-3 photos of the same spot, but from different vantage points.

I can take those pics and import them into a Photogrammetry software I use, and create 3D models of the lunar surface.
If anyone can point me in the right direction, I would greatly appreciate it



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:27 AM
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a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

Gone full screen, mesmerizing...



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:34 AM
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Personally I'm amazed at all the tracks that can be seen traversing through craters etc.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:46 AM
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I don't know a damn thing about the moon in reality.

What struck me was the "channels" (debris travel marks for lack of a better term) seen throughout the film.

I have to wonder what caused them.

They appear to be drag marks from something, but what was being dragged and why/how?

I can assume debris from meteors would be the most likely culprit for what.

It's the why/how I can't understand.

The "channels" appear to start/stop on level ground which would seem to indicate at a minimum wind force of some type was needed to move the debris, but without an atmosphere is that possible?

Even the debris on elevated positions, without seismic activity, what caused the initial motion for the debris to begin it's travel? more impacts possibly, I suppose.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: UKWO1Phot


You posted the same as I was thinking.


They are very interesting, are they not.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:54 AM
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originally posted by: 200Plus
I don't know a damn thing about the moon in reality.

What struck me was the "channels" (debris travel marks for lack of a better term) seen throughout the film.

I have to wonder what caused them.

They appear to be drag marks from something, but what was being dragged and why/how?

I can assume debris from meteors would be the most likely culprit for what.

It's the why/how I can't understand.

The "channels" appear to start/stop on level ground which would seem to indicate at a minimum wind force of some type was needed to move the debris, but without an atmosphere is that possible?

Even the debris on elevated positions, without seismic activity, what caused the initial motion for the debris to begin it's travel? more impacts possibly, I suppose.


Isn't it obvious? They're from the transformers dragging the pillars on the moon to construct a gateway, duh!

Great photos.





posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:54 AM
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originally posted by: TheKnightofDoom
This has just been released I think HD video of the Moon and an earthrise.
I think the video is on a live loop...as in it is a loop being played over and over on the channel.

It's blown me away.



en.wikipedia.org...
Great footage and thanks for sharing. Had to rewatch on the tablet. Stunning!



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 09:56 AM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

I would look at Lunar Orbiter images:

www.lpi.usra.edu...

and for modern ones:

China:

moon.bao.ac.cn...

Japan:

l2db.selene.darts.isas.jaxa.jp...

India:

issdc.gov.in...

For the above India's requires you to register and all three need their own software for the high resolution images.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

excellent, thank you! I will keep you updated if I find enough images of the same location



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: Macenroe82

No problem.

Obviously there is also the LRO:

target.lroc.asu.edu...

and the very high resolution scans of Apollo's Panoramic and Metric Camera images:

wms.lroc.asu.edu...

If you want to find a specific location for the Apollo ones I'd use the search facility here to get which ones to look for.

www.lpi.usra.edu...

I've plotted the locations of most of the Apollo Mapping Camera and all the Hasselblad orbital images here:

onebigmonkey.com...

Once you have a number you can then find the high quality versions elsewhere.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 10:15 AM
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Pretty damn majestic. No aliens needed.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 10:16 AM
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originally posted by: iTruthSeeker
a reply to: TheKnightofDoom

That's cool.


The exact same two words came out of my mouth.

Thanks for sharing OP!



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Thank you very much for your help, I grabbed 4 images and have them processing right now!



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
That second video got me thinking.
Does anyone know were to get some hi-res photos of areas on the moon. I woulds need at least 2-3 photos of the same spot, but from different vantage points.

I can take those pics and import them into a Photogrammetry software I use, and create 3D models of the lunar surface.
If anyone can point me in the right direction, I would greatly appreciate it


Sure! Arizona State University (the folks controlling the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Cameras (LROC) have a couple of useful sites site where you can get ALL of the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images (I think there is - literally - over a million of them by now) most with resolutions better than 1 meter per pixel, and many with resolutions down to 20 cm per pixel.

This - lroc.sese.asu.edu... is their main site. If you click on "Archive" you find some super-whamadyne software graphic interface stuff to zoom in.

Personally, I prefer their older site, apollo.sese.asu.edu... which started out as a map-based search engine for the thousands of Apollo Metric Camera orbital images, but expanded to include the LROC NAC images. Click on "Image Map" to bring up the interface.
On the left, use the "Map Options" to find your area of interest, either by entering the Lat & Long or by selecting the desired single-click action of your mouse (recenter or recenter & zoom). Over on the right, you can expand the "Instrument Observation Footprints" to see that you can select LROC WAC, NAC or Apollo Metric image footprints.

(NOTE: I highly recommend that you zoom in to your area of interest before selecting the LROC footprints. Like I said, there are hundreds of thousands of them, and it may take several minutes for them all to load. On the other hand, the Metric Camera footprints are best toggled while you are zoomed-out to the lunar globe, since they are restricted to the near-equatorial regions that the Apollo missions orbited over)

Once you're zoomed in to your area of interest, select the footprints you want. The Metric Camera footprints are large squares, the NAC footprints are very long, narrow rectangles aligned north & south. Note that there is a lot of overlap - this can give you the multi-angle images you want.
Once the footprints are displayed, go back to "Map Options" and (under single-click action) select "Get Footprint Info". A box will pop-up showing you all of the images that contain that particular spot that you clicked. Clicking on the heading for an image will open a new tab on your browser that shows that image with a drag & zoom interface, all of the technical information about the image, and links for downloading the images.

Happy exploring!



Oh, one last note: For some reason, a lot of the NAC images are mirror-flipped - some right-to-left, some top-to-bottom, and some both. This might have been fixed on the newer site. If not, you can use the footprint image and/or the lat & long info in the image details to sort-out the correct orientation.



posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Here is the point cloud of the lunar surface section I chose:




posted on Nov, 1 2016 @ 10:43 AM
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Creating the textured 3d now




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