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Milk protein lowers blood pressure and cholesterol.

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posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 01:29 PM
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A recent study (October 2016) has shown milk protein can help reduce the risk factors of heart disease and stroke by significantly lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. The University of Reading and University of Milan have found that the risk is reduced by 8% and that those ingesting large amounts of whey protein had healthier blood vessels.

Participants in the study drank 56g of whey protein daily, whilst the control group drank maltodrextin. The results showed a positive effect on markers of cardiovascular health:

- A reduction in blood pressure (average 3.9mmHg lower)
- A reduction in cholesterol (5% less)
- And a 12% reduction of triaclyglycerol (blood fat that increases risk of cardiovascular disease).

The participants drank a 90% whey protein shake twice a day (very popular with bodybuilders) which gave them 56g of milk protein daily.

I think this is great news for dairy lovers; previous studies have already shown that people who drink more milk are usually healthier, but now we have a study that shows milk proteins specifically reduce blood pressure.

More research is needed to further understand the positive impact of milk in our diets, especially as the sample size was small (38 people in the protein group).

The study has been published freely to the public and can be found here:

Whey protein lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial function and lipid biomarkers in adults with prehypertension and mild hypertension: results from the chronic Whey2Go randomized controlled trial




posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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Milk and the associated products collectively known as dairy is an interesting subject. It seems it can have massive health benefits while at the same time presenting massive health risks. In essence Milk from cows is designed to turn a forty pound calf into a four hundred pound cow in the shortest time possible. Therefore as we as humans are the only mammals that consume milk, and its by-products, into adulthood and beyond, it is frequently blamed as the culprit for human obesity.

It seems that up until the time of the Black Death (Circa 1330) most Europeans were lactose intolerant hence the processing of cows milk into by products such as cheese to facilitate consumption. Now it could be that the Black Death caused the gene mutation that eradicated the intolerance to lactose, or it could be that the disease wiped out all those that did not have the tolerance. This has yet to be proved either way.

It cannot be denied that many have benefitted from the consumption of milk and its by-products over the years, and we have to conclude for now that more studies such as the one you cite need to take place.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

Actually the lactose tolerance mutation happened between 2000 and 20,000 years ago and although the causes are still not know, scientists believe famine pushed the change as milk is really nutritious and saved many from starvation.

But you are correct about the great numbers of people that are lactose intolerant, as even nowadays only 35% of the world's population can drink milk without any type of problems (mostly with European ancestry).



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 02:14 PM
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I hate milk and those shake things...I wonder if they can make it into a cheese though. eating a couple slices of cheese a day for health would be fine by me.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: Agartha
a reply to: CulturalResilience

Actually the lactose tolerance mutation happened between 2000 and 20,000 years ago and although the causes are still not know, scientists believe famine pushed the change as milk is really nutritious and saved many from starvation.

But you are correct about the great numbers of people that are lactose intolerant, as even nowadays only 35% of the world's population can drink milk without any type of problems (mostly with European ancestry).

Most of asia is lactose intolerant. westerners are good with it though, I guess milk cows faired better on the west and simply died out with the people migrating east.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: Agartha

I used to drink a lot of milk, whole. I have a vit D deficiency. I stopped drinking milk and take a large Vit D supplement. My 'bad cholesterol' has gone down. My BP has always been 116/60 and is still the same.

Drinking a lot of milk seems to be a US/Canada thing. The rest of the world thinks it is for baby cows. I find that to be true.
edit on 29-10-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX
I hate milk and those shake things...I wonder if they can make it into a cheese though. eating a couple slices of cheese a day for health would be fine by me.


Ricotta cheese is the dairy with the largest amount of whey protein, aprox. 11g per 100g of cheese. I love ricotta cheese, it's delicious, but I am Italian and perhaps it is an acquired taste.




originally posted by: reldra
I used to drink a lot of milk, whole. I have a vit D deficiency. I stopped drinking milk and take a large Vit D supplement. My 'bad cholesterol' has gone down. My BP has always been 116/60 and is still the same.

Drinking a lot of milk seems to be a US/Canada thing. The rest of the world thinks it is for baby cows. I find that to be true.


Most supplements don't do us any good, but vitamin D is one I recommend: a recent study has shown that people who take vitamin D supplement live longer (I can look for that article if you want).

People drink lots of milk in Italy (where my family is from) and if you check the list of countries by milk consumption the US is 16 and Canada 30 (LINK HERE). Many countries drink lots of milk, mostly Europeans.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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yep, milk is scriptural, too.....huh!!



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

What you said is true. But also, you are ignoring the fact that people (humans) have been drinking milk for THOUSANDS of years. Just because one isolated population did not consume milk on mass does not mean others didn't.
For example, the Scandinavian peoples have been known to drink milk since pretty much the beginning of when they started herding cattle. Egyptians, and most Medd nations, Hindu as well.

That being said, evolution via selective breeding has made us humans and our bodies accept milk into it's diet, just like every other food on this planet that isn't poison. Saying humans cannot properly digest (fully) milk is a myth, sure some people are lactose intolerant, but that is simply a genetic defect, a remnant from the past when humans didn't drink cows, goat, etc. milk.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 06:04 PM
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3.9 mmhg lower that's nothing impressive, hardly a cure for hypertension.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: Agartha
Hi,

Statistically, I don't think any inferences can be made from such a tiny sample size.

Your comment on supplements is not based on science, in fact many supplements have plenty of evidence behind them. I take numerous supplements. Take a look at examine.com where all research on supplements is available. You can search individual supplements and the evidence is even broken down for you in an easy to read matrix.

Not sure why you say ricotta cheese is an acquired taste. Tiramisu (one of the few desserts I eat) is widely available in the UK although some mistake the ricotta for cream.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 10:06 PM
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The main protein in milk is also a carcinogen. And it also creates a acidic like state in our bodies, and you know the best base in our bodies to counter the acidic state? OUR BONES.



posted on Oct, 30 2016 @ 04:43 AM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
3.9 mmhg lower that's nothing impressive, hardly a cure for hypertension.


It may not look impressive but lowering BP by 5mmHg reduces the risk of stroke by 34% and reduces the risk of ischemic heart disease by 21%. Which means lowering by 3.9mmHg (which was the average) has also a significant positive impact on the body. (LINK)





originally posted by: JJjumpman23
The main protein in milk is also a carcinogen. And it also creates a acidic like state in our bodies, and you know the best base in our bodies to counter the acidic state? OUR BONES.


I'm really looking forward to the evidence you have for your statement.



posted on Oct, 30 2016 @ 05:06 AM
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originally posted by: Morrad

Hi,

Statistically, I don't think any inferences can be made from such a tiny sample size.


Hi Morrad! You are absolutely right and I also said so in my OP. However, I think it's exciting to see how milk proteins have reduced BP in all the 38 participants, without any other contributing factor (such as hypertensive meds, exercise, diet etc).


Your comment on supplements is not based on science


Sorry but I am a health professional, so whenever I make a statement about something it's because I have evidence for it. My statement is based on science.



in fact many supplements have plenty of evidence behind them. I take numerous supplements. Take a look at examine.com where all research on supplements is available. You can search individual supplements and the evidence is even broken down for you in an easy to read matrix.


Thank you for the link, it's new to me but I usually search for information on reputable medical databases. Let me give you an example of my statement 'most supplements don't do us any good': let's take the most common one, our beloved vitamin C. Vitamin C does not stop a cold like many believe (in fact proteins and zinc are the ones that can help with that) and too much of it raises the risk of kidney stones:

The failure of vitamin C supplementation to reduce the incidence of colds in the general population indicates that routine vitamin C supplementation is not justified

Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) use was associated with a statistically significant 2-fold increased risk of kidney stones



Not sure why you say ricotta cheese is an acquired taste. Tiramisu (one of the few desserts I eat) is widely available in the UK although some mistake the ricotta for cream.


Yummy, Tiramisu! lol

Tiramisu is made with Mascarpone cheese, which is like a very thick double cream. Ricotta is pure whey, it's like a thicker cottage cheese.



posted on Oct, 30 2016 @ 05:40 AM
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Milk has interesting psychoactive components. It makes people susceptible to suggestion, and puts the brain in a 'soft' state that is more malleable and receptive to learning new information.

Interestingly, alcohol has the opposite effects.



posted on Oct, 30 2016 @ 06:09 AM
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originally posted by: imjack
Milk has interesting psychoactive components. It makes people susceptible to suggestion, and puts the brain in a 'soft' state that is more malleable and receptive to learning new information.

Interestingly, alcohol has the opposite effects.


Very interesting, never heard of that. Do you have any links I can read?



posted on Oct, 30 2016 @ 06:35 AM
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originally posted by: Agartha

originally posted by: imjack
Milk has interesting psychoactive components. It makes people susceptible to suggestion, and puts the brain in a 'soft' state that is more malleable and receptive to learning new information.

Interestingly, alcohol has the opposite effects.


Very interesting, never heard of that. Do you have any links I can read?


The source I originally read was mind blowing, and also creditable. I can't find it though.

There are a dozenish studies that claim milk helps your memory. Obviously it was the suggestion part that took my interest, as our overlords demand we drink Milk, and most of the rest of the world doesn't. Essentially there are some parts of it to help the mother 'calm' the child and drinking it makes you influence-able.
edit on 30-10-2016 by imjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2016 @ 08:58 AM
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Hi Agartha,

It was late here when I posted yesterday and I wrote my post very quickly. I hope it didn't come across as aggressive or condescending.

As you aware, small studies often lead to larger studies in attempt for replication and valiation.

I was a healthcare provider as well prior to my current ill health. My knowledge of nutrition, outside of my area of expertise, is limited. I use that site as its actually a meta-analysis of all available scientific research with links to all the studies (50, 000 of them). If you search for Vitamin C there is very little evidence of positive effects from robust double-blind studies at normal doses.

A study from the website you linked to has another study which says the opposite.


No contribution of ascorbic acid to renal calcium oxalate stones.

Abstract

Even though a certain part of oxalate in the urine derives from metabolized ascorbic acid (AA), the intake of high doses of vitamin C does not increase the risk of calcium oxalate kidney stones due to physiological regulatory factor: gastrointestinal absorption as well as renal tubular reabsorption of AA are saturable processes, and the metabolic transformation of AA to oxalate is limited as well. Older assays for urinary oxalate favored in vitro conversion of AA to oxalate during storage and processing of the samples. Recurrent stone formers and patients with renal failure who have a defect in AA or oxalate metabolism should restrict daily vitamin C intakes to approximately 100 mg. But in the large-scale Harvard Prospective Health Professional Follow-Up Study, those groups in the highest quintile of vitamin C intake (> 1,500 mg/day) had a lower risk of kidney stones than the groups in the lowest quintiles.


Link

I have researched all the supplements I take in regard to my current illness. Vitamin D supplements are now officially recommended during the winter months in the UK as we are too far North to receive sufficient quality sunlight to manufacture it ourselves.

Vitamin D from the examine website:





Sample research study link.



I take Co-Enzyme Q10 which has robust evidence for a marked reduction in neuropathic pain at 200mg doses. It is expensive but it does work for me.

Mascarpone cheese, of course you are right. It was late. Apologies.




posted on Oct, 30 2016 @ 09:02 AM
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A further mutation took place around the time I suggested. a reply to: Agartha



posted on Oct, 30 2016 @ 09:06 AM
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I did not make any of the claims you are suggesting I did. If you are going to reply to my posts please do me the courtesy of taking the time to read and understand what I have posted.

Many Thanks.
a reply to: strongfp



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