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Aircraft On Fire at Ohare

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posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 07:32 PM
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Yep, that was determined 4 hours ago.




posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 07:33 PM
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Yeah... it's real alright...


Airport fire Chief Timothy Sampey said crews responded to a report of a No. 2 engine on fire. The plane, which had stopped well before the end of the runway, had about 43,000 pounds of fuel on board.

"This could have been absolutely devastating if it happened later," he said.
About 20 people people were taken to the hospital with minor injuries that occurred during the evacuation down the emergency slides, District Chief Juan Hernandez said. There were people with minor bruising or injured ankles, he said. None of the injuries were caused by the fire.
American Airlines spokeswoman Leslie Scott said 170 people -- including 161 passengers -- and one dog were on board Flight 383 bound for Miami when it aborted takeoff due to an engine-related mechanical issue.

edition.cnn.com...



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: masqua

Yeah, the timing and wording of the first notice sucked. It broke right after the fire department came out saying they were having a firefighting exercise in the burn pit, so there was a lot of confusion as to if it was an exercise, or a real fire for the first few minutes. It didn't help that the first fire department notice was "plane down", so finding any information for the first little bit was difficult at best.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:50 PM
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Great to see people standing outside the airplane with their carry on bags... If I'm evacuating a jet on fire you're not going to see me stop in the aisle to drag out my bags while the jets burns around me.

Doh!



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: F4guy

Yeah, this doesn't seem to be that intense of an abort. It was probably a pretty light airplane with 170 people only going ORD-MIA, but this still doesn't seem like it would be close to V1 cut territory. Plus it's a 13,000 ft runway.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:56 PM
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I was at O'Hare waiting on a plane today and this happened near my gate. Plane was on a roll to take off, tire blew, caught engine and wing on fire. Whole airport was on ground stop for about 1 hour.

We heard a boom at the gate and saw black smoke. People started rushing to windows... everyone thought the worst at first. Glad to see everyone got off plane safely. Heard a few people had minor injuries.

Idiots that grabbed their bags should be charged.


edit on 10/28/2016 by Finalized because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/28/2016 by Finalized because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 05:47 AM
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originally posted by: justwanttofly
a reply to: F4guy

Yeah, this doesn't seem to be that intense of an abort. It was probably a pretty light airplane with 170 people only going ORD-MIA, but this still doesn't seem like it would be close to V1 cut territory. Plus it's a 13,000 ft runway.


Runway length has nothing to do with V1 speed. V1 is computed using aircraft weight, airport elevation, and air temperature.I don't know if you've ever tried to stop a half million pounds of 130 mph asymetrically thrusted aircraft on less than a full set of tires, but it will surely raise your heartrate, even on a 13,000 foot runway. You have a 200 foot wide aircraft on a 200 foot wide runway with the operating engine trying to turn you both with normal thrust and still once you get the reversers out. The engines on the 777 are almost 35 feet from the aircraft centerline. That's a pretty decent moment arm.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 09:39 AM
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Another GE uncontained engine failure. Parts of the fan section were found 1/2 mile from the aircraft on the roof of a building used by UPS.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

What rpm do they turn at?



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

The CF6-80C2, it looks like, has a fan RPM of about 3800, with a 106 inch diameter fan.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 12:46 PM
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so, just as they were getting a hail of a push.....thunk ?
did they maybe hear or feel that....I'm thinking time to react wise....if they were coming out of the hole at O'Hare, then that's really bad.
edit on 29-10-2016 by GBP/JPY because: our new King.....He comes right after a nicely done fake one



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: GBP/JPY

We heard a boom in the gatehouse.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 01:26 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
Another GE uncontained engine failure. Parts of the fan section were found 1/2 mile from the aircraft on the roof of a building used by UPS.



Have they verified the tire went first, then the engine? Or could an engine part flatten have flattened a tire.

In other words tire debris into engine or engine debris into tire.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

It's not clear yet. It'll probably be at least a few days before they can figure that out. They're going to have to do an in depth inspection of the fan, to try to determine why it came apart, and if it was manufacturing or something else.

The injury total is now 21, mostly evacuation related injuries. Those slides tend to cause sprains and bruising when you go down them.
edit on 10/29/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 01:42 PM
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The crew initially didn't know they were on fire. They radioed that they were stopping on the runway, and the tower radioed back "Roger. Fire." The crew then asked if they saw fire, and were told fire off the right wing. The crew then requested the trucks and radioed that they were evacuating.

There are conflicting reports from passengers. Some say everyone was panicking and demanding the doors be opened, others say it was calm and orderly.

According to the tower recordings, another plane saw the tire go first, and then the fire start. They reported seeing sparks at the tire level at the start of the event.




posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 01:59 PM
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Thanks for the audio. Didn't see any yesterday and just got back into this afternoon.

The investigation will most likely sort it all out. The few seconds of a visual as it happened can make things appear different then reality, as we all know.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 02:56 PM
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lose the dual double wheels.....do the brakes still work? I'm curious....a reply to: F4guy


edit on 29-10-2016 by GBP/JPY because: our new King.....He comes right after a nicely done fake one



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 07:39 PM
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originally posted by: GBP/JPY
lose the dual double wheels.....do the brakes still work? I'm curious....a reply to: F4guy



Actually, the 777 has dual triple tires on each truck for a total of 12 tires, each with Goodrich duracarb carbon fiber brakes. But if a tire blows, it loses traction and is ineffective at helping to stop. On the 777, you have a selectable decelleration rate function called autobrakes, probably set at the minimum for takeoff.And, of course, they are equipped with antiskid, which means that if the centrifugal sensor senses an impending lockup the brakes are released. In addition you have a huge amount of kinetic energy to dissipate. Remember the kinetic energy is one-half mass times the velocity squared. The mass of the accident aircraft was the basic operating weight of 300,000 pounds plus the mass of 160 passengers and luggage (32,000 pounds +-) and 43,000 pounds of fuel. That is a lot of energy to convert to heat. I guarantee that the brakes were glowing red hot.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: F4guy

This was a 767-323ER not a Triple.



posted on Oct, 29 2016 @ 08:30 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: F4guy

This was a 767-323ER not a Triple.


Thanks. In that case it is a pair of doubles on each bogie. The 767 also has autobrake and has a selectable RTO (rejected take off) mode that applies max braking if the aircraft is on the ground at more than 85 knots and both thrust levers are pulled back to idle. The 76 also uses carbon brakes instead of steel on the -200 and -300 series. The BOW of the -323 is 190,000 pounds.



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