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Insane Waves In The Roaring Forties

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posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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Utter insanity:



The Cook Straight, in New Zealand, funnels some of the stronger wind currents on Earth through a narrow opening, creating the insane waves shown here. A brief story of one trips nightmare crossing in a ferry:



The Roaring Forties


Unlike the northern hemisphere, the large tracts of open ocean below 40th parallel south (interrupted only by Tasmania, New Zealand, and the southern part of South America) mean that higher windspeeds — the Roaring Forties — can develop.[1] Similar but stronger wind conditions are prevalent closer to the South Pole; these are referred to as the "Furious Fifties" (50 to 60 degrees south), and the "Shrieking" or "Screaming Sixties" (below 60 degrees south).[2] The latitude ranges for the Roaring Forties and similar winds are not consistent, shifting towards the South Pole in the southern summer, and towards the Equator in the southern winter.[1]


And for those interested, Cook Straight.

Im not a fan of ocean travels, personally.




posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan


Im not a fan of ocean travels, personally.


You just gotta roll with it





posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 12:31 PM
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Ah that's nothing dude, I've done the crossing to Lundy on the Oldenburgh (normally referred to as The Old and Buggered by all who have survived sailing in her) on a windy Bristol Channel day. The skipper issued his orders to the crew from the lifeboat. That poor old craft would roll like a barrel on a slightly damp lawn bless her, they actually have a colour chart by which they can tell how close a passenger is to motion sickness, didn't effect me.



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: rockintitz

Yeah, that room is not prepared for waves. At all.

LOL, i'd have 2 choices: stay up all night puking with motion sickness, or take so much dramamine that nothing would keep me awake. Thats how i have to fly. If i were to ever be in a crash, im the dude that won't even wake up for it.



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 12:37 PM
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originally posted by: CulturalResilience
Ah that's nothing dude, I've done the crossing to Lundy on the Oldenburgh (normally referred to as The Old and Buggered by all who have survived sailing in her) on a windy Bristol Channel day. The skipper issued his orders to the crew from the lifeboat. That poor old craft would roll like a barrel on a slightly damp lawn bless her, they actually have a colour chart by which they can tell how close a passenger is to motion sickness, didn't effect me.


If you read this post with a pirates voice, it sounds even better.


You must be made for the ocean, if you can handle that kind of motion. Im terribly sensitive to motion sickness, presumably for a long series of ear infections as a kid. I seem to have some balance issues (not terrible, but im not much of a dancer either) related to the same.



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 12:46 PM
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Thank you.

I am from an area that has a lengthy association with piracy wrecking and smugglers. I can also claim descent from some of the second oldest professions practitioners. My Great Grandfather despite being in the Royal Navy had the captain's safe from many a stricken vessel allegedly and was almost always in possession of a large wad of cash that he claimed was not his while my Great Grandmother went through his clothing for pennies as he slept.

I don't normally speak like Robert Newton but I can do the voice and am familiar with the vernacular.

I'm surprised to hear a Texan not be a good sailor suppose you are not from Galveston.

Ah just saw how you have had ear infections my apologies.


originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan

originally posted by: CulturalResilience
Ah that's nothing dude, I've done the crossing to Lundy on the Oldenburgh (normally referred to as The Old and Buggered by all who have survived sailing in her) on a windy Bristol Channel day. The skipper issued his orders to the crew from the lifeboat. That poor old craft would roll like a barrel on a slightly damp lawn bless her, they actually have a colour chart by which they can tell how close a passenger is to motion sickness, didn't effect me.


If you read this post with a pirates voice, it sounds even better.


You must be made for the ocean, if you can handle that kind of motion. Im terribly sensitive to motion sickness, presumably for a long series of ear infections as a kid. I seem to have some balance issues (not terrible, but im not much of a dancer either) related to the same.

edit on 23-10-2016 by CulturalResilience because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-10-2016 by CulturalResilience because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 12:47 PM
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As a sailor who have road of quite a few storms in 25 years i like this thread.

My first ship Gulstav trader which i rounded the world oceans with in the 80, now imagine the same types of waves in the OP with this relatively small coaster...It's a blast, we are talking walking on the walls.


I love the sea and the violent waves it creates, it's my adrenaline rush, i'm not sailing anymore though.



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 12:53 PM
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Did you and your shipmates ever play the game of gravity defying leaps during the pitch and toss?a reply to: Mianeye



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 01:20 PM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

We sure did, we also played soccer in the cargo room during storms, it's crazy amazing fun, or how many steps on the walls you could get in a roll before the counter roll, lol sometimes you just crashed hard to the floor...Damn now i miss a ship



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 01:22 PM
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originally posted by: CulturalResilience
Did you and your shipmates ever play the game of gravity defying leaps during the pitch and toss?a reply to: Mianeye
I did that in the Navy.




posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

That looks terrifying! I think if I lived there and had to travel, I would just fly over.
In your link, I'm surprised there haven't been more (#) serious accidents.

Last year was the first year that I got all five kids on the boat at the same time in Panama City. I knew my daughters had sea legs (me and their Dad both do) but the three boys had never been at/or on the ocean. The water was a little rough (nothing like that, of course!) but, it was windy that day and there was some rather intense 'heave ho' when we got in more open water. Only one got motion sickness. You just sort of had to crawl (for his sake). If you stopped, the rocking made him sick and if you went too fast, the up and down made him sick.

I'm sharing the photo for the chuckle effect. He had dyed his hair green, wore a green shirt and was green from being seasick. We called him Kermit the rest of the day! That photo was just in the little bay. We can laugh now because it's over and he is okay. It was sad at the moment.
Poor fella! He says he will never get on a boat again and didn't for the rest of the trip and hasn't since!

But, out of 7 people and only one got sick, I think those were really good odds. Not so much for him. He slept like that the whole way back also. I didn't realize the ear infection/motion sickness connection. He also suffered with them as a youngster. He had to have tubes and all that jazz. My oldest also but perhaps because she is older and there has been more time between hers and his that it doesn't effect her anymore?

Anyway, sorry for the long post, it must suck not being able to enjoy the ocean or the view from a plane.

edit on 23-10-2016 by TNMockingbird because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 01:49 PM
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I love this thread!
I love ocean travel and all things ships and sea related. Awesome videos.



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 02:06 PM
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when I was in my 20s I went to cape hatteras with some friends during hurricane bob to surf,,like a fool we paddled out as soon as it cleaned up, I nearly died that day, there is some major force behind mountains of water



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 06:45 PM
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Its Cook Strait, not Straight

I live near there, yeah it can get rough.
They often cancel the crossings because it is too rough, about once a month
we get Gales through here 100kmph+ all the time, its just part of life
else where they call them Hurricanes



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: muzzy
Its Cook Strait, not Straight

I live near there, yeah it can get rough.
They often cancel the crossings because it is too rough, about once a month
we get Gales through here 100kmph+ all the time, its just part of life
else where they call them Hurricanes




LOL, i may go on a mispelling spree just to drive our OCD friends crazy.


You are lucky to live near the ocean. I have a 10 hour drive to the Gulf of Mexico. Got tons of sand for a beach....just no water. LOL.



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 07:16 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan
not the response I expected
anyone can spell incorrectly
so where you from?
can't be Huston, so must be Dalas

see, misspelling isn't that clever is it?



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 09:21 PM
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originally posted by: muzzy
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan
not the response I expected
anyone can spell incorrectly
so where you from?
can't be Huston, so must be Dalas

see, misspelling isn't that clever is it?


Im way out in the middle of the sticks, not too far from Midland/Odessa area. 12 hours from HOuston, 6 hours from Dallas. 5 hours from San Antonio. Basically, a long way from anywhere interesting.

I was making lighthearted (intended) commentary. Im a grammar nazi that fights his urges daily. Im worse in person with mispronounced words. Was more of a "one off topic comment deserves another" type of dealio.



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Thank you for a wonderful and intriguing post.

Knowing you only from your posts over the years I can't help but take your OP with a side order of seafood and omens.

Have a good Sunday (what's left of it
)!


edit on 23-10-2016 by Dan00 because:




posted on Oct, 24 2016 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Interesting read, thanks BFFT.


Now I understand why the waters are so infamously treacherous for ships trying to trek around Cape Hope... it's because of the wide open waters with little land around the area to break the winds.

This land lubber learned something new today.



Yes, I'm a land lubber... I too am susceptible to severe motion sickness at the drop of a hat... I get motion sickness in a fricken canoe !





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