It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Help ATS via PayPal:
learn more

Are we now under the control of the Internet hallway monitors?

page: 1
14
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 10:00 AM
link   
I knew that earlier this month that the Internet would begin to be used in a way to violate peoples basic human right to free speech once it left the control of the US.

And when it cam out that Julian had his internet access cut off at first I thought it was done by this new internet handler.

But I guess the Ecuadorian govt has the right to cut its service to anyone they feel would jeopardize their countries best interest.

So what interests were in danger if they didn't cut him off?

Were their emails with Hillary between them and Ecuadorian Govt?

Does anyone seem surprised that Assange's Internet was cut off seeing the internet is controlled by new handlers?

Who are these new handlers and how will they affect us?

Would this have been allowed if the US was still in control of the internet?

Who will be next to have their internet cut off and their freedom of speech limited or a fair hearing before it would be done?

Will it be the Liberal MSM or just right wing sites that will be targeted?

Internet censure has begun in the form of collusion.

But how far will it go before the people start to fight it?

It seems for now the glow gals with a thousand likes and their gaming boys will not even know or care about their rights on the internet, until they no longer can access their FB accts or their favorite games.

edit on 22-10-2016 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 10:21 AM
link   
I'm sure those that remain 'Unaware and compliant' will be fine.

That's how the Establishment want to keep things and Hillary will deliver it for them.

Meanwhile, the rest of us may have to get off our butts and do something about it.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 10:23 AM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

There's no "new internet handler". That's just people taking what ICANN is and does out of context.

That being said makes the rest of your post irrelevant as it's all based around a falsehood.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 10:25 AM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

I honestly think that the internet shut downs were ordered by the current administration as a trial run to see if they can stop Americans from getting the truth about obama and hillary from Wikileaks.

But,I'm sure that obama has more false flag attacks up his sleeve that he can blame on the Russians. (Ones that don't involve the internet)





edit on 22-10-2016 by Picklesneeze because: oops



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 10:25 AM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

The "handover of control" is just for naming of websites

If the us had full control of the internet this whole time, why wouldn't we have cut off his internet long ago?

The big internet companies, ie google, facebook, twitter, yahoo... and Govts. have been manipulating what you see on the internet for as long as it's been around, I haven't noticed anything different.

It is manipulated and controlled, I just think your blame/concerns are misplaced.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 10:40 AM
link   

originally posted by: Picklesneeze
a reply to: ChesterJohn

I honestly think that the internet shut downs were ordered by the current administration as a trial run to see if they can stop Americans from getting the truth about obama and hillary from Wikileaks.

But,I'm sure that obama has more false flag attacks up his sleeve that he can blame on the Russians. (Ones that don't involve the internet)






*edit* Or are you talking about Assanges internet being cutt off? Ooops

Wikileaks made a statement yesterday that the shutdowns were caused by their supporters as a sort of protest since they thought something had happened to Assange. That's the report anyway.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 22-10-2016 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-10-2016 by iTruthSeeker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 10:43 AM
link   
I think we will have to wait and see if my concerns are real or not. But as for now the service providers control our access.

I hope to see what is found in wikileaks file dumps and how no one will be charged with any crimes or even rate reporting on from the MSM, seeing the same service providers are owned by the same people who own the MSM and the Govt's of the world.
edit on 22-10-2016 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 10:52 AM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

DNS (Domain Name Servers) and ISPs (Internet Service Providers) aren't the same thing.

One is about the naming (and, in some cases, hosting) of websites (websites are static IP addresses that get assigned an actual name) and one provides the Internet.

You're getting your terms mixed up by what you're seeing on a conspiracy site.
edit on 22102016 by TerryDon79 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 11:07 AM
link   

originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: ChesterJohn

The "handover of control" is just for naming of websites

If the us had full control of the internet this whole time, why wouldn't we have cut off his internet long ago?

The big internet companies, ie google, facebook, twitter, yahoo... and Govts. have been manipulating what you see on the internet for as long as it's been around, I haven't noticed anything different.

It is manipulated and controlled, I just think your blame/concerns are misplaced.


I am sure at some point large fees will be required.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 12:04 PM
link   
Assange is a guest of the Ecuadorian embassy and as such, is using their facilities. It's THEIR Internet connection he is using. It isn't HIS Internet service. He's borrowing it and it is paid for by the Ecuadorian government.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 12:59 PM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

He was staying in a property owned by the Ecuadorian government. For them to allow Assange to leak stolen emails could be considered an act of war.

They ain't stupid.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 01:02 PM
link   
So then are we next if our providers don't like our upload and download History?

Or maybe what we are blogging or even visiting sites like ATS.

We will have to wait and see.

Pretty much all the stateside websites that allow for torrent downloads are currently down or going down.

Maybe the hand off it to help them facilitate the same in other countries.

Never the less someone else is limiting what we can and cannot do and if we don't come in line will we all get the message

i.e. Sorry for the inconvenience however *service has been permanently disabled for this user*
edit on 22-10-2016 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 01:16 PM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

If you were in my house, and you were downloading pirated movies, my provider would inform me that if i did not stop allowing pirated movies to be downloaded through my connection, my connection would be blocked. If my provider does not do this, they will be sued under DMCA.

What happened to Assange is similar. He was using the Ecuadorian Governments internet connection to provoke the US, which would be an act of war.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 01:25 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

So if I was in your house and I was downloading Julian Assange's trove of wikileak files it is ok though, right?

It seems it was ok until the files were something that would hurt Hillary and now they cut it off. But for 4 years they did nothing to stop him. so why stop him now? Unless they are being pressured, threatened or have something to lose.

Always ok for the left but never for the right.
edit on 22-10-2016 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 02:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: ChesterJohn
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

So if I was in your house and I was downloading Julian Assange's trove of wikileak files it is ok though, right?

It seems it was ok until the files were something that would hurt Hillary and now they cut it off. But for 4 years they did nothing to stop him. so why stop him now? Unless they are being pressured, threatened or have something to lose.

Always ok for the left but never for the right.


They probably are being pressured, but the fact remains that Assange is there freeloading off their internet connection at their expense. That means they get to make the rules. After four years I imagine his welcome is kind of worn out. I doubt if Ecuador had any idea when they let him stay for a few weeks it would turn out he would be providing them with a whole lot of "free" publicity they didn't need for as long as he has. He's kinda like the house guest from hell. If you had been in my house dominating my internet connection and flipping the bird at all my neighbors, i would have thrown you out long ago.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 02:14 PM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn



I think we will have to wait and see if my concerns are real or not. But as for now the service providers control our access.


My provider is Verizon, everything I do online goes through them. Wow they must be shocked!



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 02:15 PM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

Ecuador confirms it cut the cord.

Ecuador has its own Presidential election next year. Ineligible to run for re-election in 2017, current President Correa has endorsed a former Vice President in his administration, Lenin Moreno. Risking retaliation interference in his own country's 2017 election, isn't it likely that Correa gave the nod in an effort to preserve his legacy?

Ecuador has its own issues with media and freedom of speech.

In 2013, President Correa signed a communications law that gives the government broad powers to limit free speech. The law requires all information disseminated by media to be “verified” and “precise,” opening the door to censorship by allowing the government to decide what information meets these vague criteria. It also prohibits “media lynching,” defined as “repeatedly disseminating information with the purpose of discrediting or harming the reputation of a person or entity.” In addition, it prohibits what it terms “censorship,” which, under the law’s definition, includes the failure of private media outlets to cover issues that the government considers to be of “public interest.”


So I wonder, what happens to Assagne when Correa is out of power?



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 07:55 PM
link   
a reply to: EightAhoy

I imagine those with an unfriendly disposition towards Assange will take great interest in the outcome of Equador's 2017 election. I wonder how the people there feel about the situation as it is now, and if it were to suddenly change in a way that is detrimental to the well-being of Assange? Are they proud of their current status? Do they care? Will they care? Does it matter (to their gov)?

Would it be possible for him to escape to somewhere safer? ...without being droned in the process?



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 07:57 PM
link   
a reply to: ChesterJohn

Because doing so now seems to be influncing the election, and that is something you declare war over. One of the few times I'd likely support war, as defending our sovereignty is their job.

that said, i do support assange's efforts. Mostly because i view our government as illegitimate.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 09:11 PM
link   
a reply to: 3n19m470


a reply to: EightAhoy
I imagine those with an unfriendly disposition towards Assange will take great interest in the outcome of Equador's 2017 election. I wonder how the people there feel about the situation as it is now, and if it were to suddenly change in a way that is detrimental to the well-being of Assange? Are they proud of their current status? Do they care? Will they care? Does it matter (to their gov)? Would it be possible for him to escape to somewhere safer? ...without being droned in the process?


Great questions. Will be interesting to watch this play out. I wonder if that country's media is "sanctioned" to report on the embassy situation. The more I read about Correa's political leanings, the more surprised I am over his support for Asaagne... unless, it is politically motivated. Unrelated, or not: Ecuador just opened a trade office in Iran.



new topics

top topics



 
14
<<   2 >>

log in

join