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Psychiatry, Psychology, and/or other Mental Health Care -related Fields

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posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 01:49 PM
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I'm curious to know about ATS's opinions regarding psychiatry, psychology, and/or other mental health care -related fields? I ask, because; I was diagnosed by a psychiatrist with “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder” back in July of 2013. A psychologist diagnosed me with the following three disorders: “Major Depressive Disorder” — “Generalized Anxiety Disorder” and “Social Anxiety Disorder” back in July of 2016 (after administering the “Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - 2” alongside several other diagnostic classification, rating scales, checklists, inventories, and surveys.) However, I can't help but notice that most people don't consider these to be real “illnesses”. In fact, even I'm not sure that I believe these to be real illnesses.

Nobody in my family (or anybody else around me, for that matter) seems to give a single # about me having been diagnosed with these disorders. A cousin of mine simply scoffed at the idea of me being diagnosed with ADHD, making a dismissive hand gesture at me and proclaiming, “everybody has ADHD!” My mother tells me, “oh, you have depression? Then why don't you simply stop being depressed? Will yourself out of your depression!” Other people have told me that social anxiety isn't a “real problem”.

I've noticed that even among all of my doctors there's disagreements about what is or isn't “science”. What is or isn't “pseudoscience”. I'll have my psychiatrist telling me, “for testing for personality disorders there's the 'MMPI-2' which isn't very scientific.” I'll have my psychologist telling me, “the psychiatrists of today are like the alchemists of the Middle Ages. The alchemists believed that they could create gold from lead, which we now know is impossible. Psychiatrists believe in 'chemical imbalances'. There is no such thing as 'chemical imbalances'.”

So what do you guys think? Do you guys thinks that psychiatry is bull#? What about psychology, or other mental health care -related fields?




posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

Personally I have seen positive results from treatments like Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and one-on-one counseling with psychotherapists.

It certainly is a science, and the conditions you've mentioned being diagnosed with are not all that uncommon, and there are many viable treatments out there (I'm sure your doctors have mentioned some possibilities).

I would encourage you to do your own exploring and find out what works and what doesn't, do a basic background lookup and research things online to find out more. Sorry to hear your family hasn't been more supportive. You aren't alone.



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

Psychiatry/psychology is not bulls**t, however I trust psychologists a bit more because they can not prescribe medication, and therefore have less of an incentive to push to throw you on meds.

Quick question--have you ever considered being tested for Asperger's Syndrome? I only ask because my son was diagnosed with ADHD, and then realizing it was more than that, we asked to have him looked at for that, and sure enough, he has it, and has evidence of all three things that you mentioned. It's a possibility.

As for your family ignoring these issues, that really sucks. Even if you're over-diagnosed, misdiagnosed, or just have mild effects from the disorders, you really should be able to count on at least your family for some support in managing and helping out with these issues where they can.

With my son's ADHD, we tried for years to go the all-natural route, and nothing really seemed to work very well, so we finally bit the bullet for his sake and tried some medication (mainly because he was showing bouts of depression). We tried Strattera at first, and after a few months on it, we noticed that he lost all motivation to do anything active, lost his appetite, and was having some uncontrollable bouts of anger, so we weaned him off of that and gave him a couple month's break. We then tried Adderal, and he has been on it for quite a while now and it is working fabulously to control the symptoms of the ADHD while not altering his personality or behavior (other than an inability to focus and jumping off the walls). As an added bonus, with his ADHD under decent control, it's also reduced the severity of his Asperger's symptoms as well, and he's overall much happier, a better big brother to his toddler sister (there's a 10-year gap in age), and much easier to handle when out in crowded or noisy (uncomfortable for him) situations.

I hope that you get the familial support that you need, and I would ask about Asperger's--there's no medication to help it, but at least you'll know, and if you're on medication for any of the other things that you mentioned, those could actually exacerbate Asperger's symptoms.

It never hurts to ask, and I'd ask a psychologist over a psychiatrist.

ETA: If your family is scientifically minded in the least, it's pretty easy to show things like brain scans that compare the brain activity of "normal" brains compared to those who suffer from ADHD, depression, anxiety, etc., and exactly how drastic the differences can be. If that doesn't help--hell, I don't know.
edit on 21-10-2016 by SlapMonkey because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

Are you abusing drugs or alcohol? Or any type of OTC medication?



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

More importantly what do you think of their diagnosis? Why did you go to them?

One symptom of adhd is not paying attention, not listening to others or short attention span. Do you think you have a problem paying attention?



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

i think the reason so many people disagree with such diagnoses, is the concept that a disorder is implied as a permanent thing you must live with.

whereas most consider these to be mental states only, sure some people can get stuck in a mental state and it can be hard to break free from, but not impossible, as our brains are plastic (changeable moldable literally even physically) so people dont want to accept that a mental state can be impossible to break free from, but in such resistance they fail to realize that they can still be very difficult to break free from, especially for people who have no idea how to do so.



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

Did you have to endure mental, emotional, or physical abuse as a child? If you did, you may also have post traumatic stress disorder, denationalization disorder, and/or dis-associative personality disorder. I am not a psychologist or doctor, so this isn't medical advice, but you should talk to your counselor if you had to endure any sort of abuse growing up.

None of this post is to be interpreted as medical advice. Speak to your physician(s) for all medical advice!

As far as ADHD, many adults have it. I've heard that the medications they prescribe for that condition can be addictive. I've also heard that rittallin is hard on the kidneys. I've heard that aderall is hard on the heart and the liver. I've heard that all of the medications they prescribe for ADHD are hard on different organs. If the doctor gives you a medication that helps you, by all means follow his orders. I'm just sharing this info to let you know about the risks.

Generally, people diagnosed with ADHD are above average IQ. There are some people that say that ADHD people could be on the Autism Spectrum, but much closer to people that are borderline like Aspergers Syndrome (Higher-Functioning). I'm guessing you may have a short attention span for tasks. You are probably very good at multitasking, but very bad at keeping track of important things. All just speculation, everyone is different.

Do you have a photographic or semi/photographic memory? Many people diagnosed with ADHD have these traits as well. Generally people with ADHD have very good comprehension of written materials, and some even have photographic memory for documents (Bill Clinton comes to mind). I know he has a photographic memory (don't know if he's ADHD though).

If you have the talents I listed above, you would be very good as a journalist or news reporter. I would recommend staying away from IT/computer service type work. I would recommend staying away from anything "too repetitive" in the career area. People with ADHD need a job that provides LOTS of variety in the work that they do, in order to stay on task. They get bored with daily constant repetition and that's where the depression originates (my opinion).

An example of a job that's good for ADHD people is working at a plant nursery (or owning one). There's so much variety in that type of work. Planting the seeds, transplanting, watering, fertilizing, etc., etc., etc.. It never gets boring! If you find something like that, there's a possibility it might help you feel better to where you are looking forward to each day as an exciting new experience.

In some cases picking up a hobby or two can help with the doldrums of life. I know people that are into hunting, hiking, rock climbing after training, mountain biking, fishing, skydiving, cross-country skiing, snowboarding, racquetball, tennis, volleyball, RC Planes, DIY of all kinds (building, refurbishing, etc., etc.) and more.
edit on 10/21/2016 by InFriNiTee because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 04:31 PM
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posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

I have the same diagnoses as you, with PTSD and OCPD added in for good measure and have roughly 32 years of personal experience to draw from. Given that a few thoughts:

People being dismissive is, in my experience at least, is very common. Especially where family is concerned. There is a lot of taboo in our society about mental illnesses - negative associations. It's hard for others to feel comfortable discussing or accepting these things. This is worse with family because there can be biological causes or predispositions - so if they accept that you have these problems, they are forced to face the reality that they, too, might suffer from them at some point.

Also, everyone gets depressed or anxious at times. It's hard for others to understand that being anxious and actually having anxiety are not the same thing.

As for a psychologist telling you that there's no such thing as a chemical imbalance? All I can say is find a new psychologist because that is empirically incorrect. Take mental illness of the table and we're still left with things like diabetes or thyroid problems which are chemical imbalances.

Ideally if you are seeing both a psychiatrist and a psychologist then they should be working in tandem with the psychiatrist handling your medication and your psychologist handling behavior modification and talk therapy.

The worst thing that you can do, regardless of all else, is to try to pretend that there is no problem. No matter what techniques you end up choosing to deal with it - medication, meditation, exercise, diet, altering behaviors etc... do something. Ignoring things will only make it worse in the long run.



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist



Psychiatrists believe in 'chemical imbalances'. There is no such thing as 'chemical imbalances'.”


Whether it's an 'imbalance' or not my depression is completely reversed with Wellbutrin (bupropion). There isn't really anything in my life to be especially depressed about (other than being mortal and Trump). Yet I will experience depression when untreated. Something about that boost in dopamine. Almost like my default is lacking in it and the drug helps bring me to 'normal' levels.
edit on 21-10-2016 by Lucid Lunacy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

FYI: I would just like to say illness, disease, disorder, syndrome, deficiency, developmental...are all quite different as to what they are.

By your thread opening post...I wouldnt say you have any "illness" per 'se...but the possibility of some forms of "disorder". Look the definitions up for yourself.

In doing so, I think youll find you dont have any "illness", though that can be used in a broad sense...but moreso...youre exhibiting signs of several "disorders" and basically not "ill" as these symptoms are common in the world to many.

Good Luck to you!

MS
EMT/ERT
Advance Life Support



posted on Oct, 21 2016 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist


Forget finding a box to fit your head. Basically, learn about the aspects of what you know about yourself. Some afflictions like ADD and ADHD are fairly evident to one and all, meaning you and your social contacts. Given ADD, (my affliction) you can fairly well understand why you would be depressed. It doesn't take a rocket scientist or a shrink to make that connection. (Showing you a score justifies the price the professional charges.)

Find your own way and it will give you some measure of satisfaction even if the general herd (and family) do not understand you for the person you are. That heads-up specifically applies to your approach to a livelihood. Find a type of work or schooling that you feel comfortable.

Your ending up by asking us whether mental health is BS or not is asking the wrong question, the wrong approach to what ails you.



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 02:12 AM
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originally posted by: Quasiscientist
So what do you guys think? Do you guys thinks that psychiatry is bull#? What about psychology, or other mental health care -related fields?

Most shrinks, in my experience, as so f-ed up that their attempts at healing/understanding others is an attempt to learn how to heal himself!
Most shrinks are nothing other than drug pushers, with the local 'gang's' approval.
They are mere moments from water torturing people and electrocuting folks!

Here's something that might give you some Perspective;

psychrights.org...

On Being Sane In Insane Places

I wouldn't take the 'cataloging' of a bunch of 'nuts' who stand to gain by selling you drugs, too seriously.

There's a difference between being 'depressed' and being sad, at times, in such a f-ed up world with so much pain!
Only a real nut wouldn't feel the pain on occasion!



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

I asked my first psychiatrist ,a very well respected one this question . Are you people any closer to understanding how the brain works . His reply was ,the more we know the less we know . Says it all really .

ETA ,i am bipolar
edit on 22-10-2016 by hutch622 because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-10-2016 by hutch622 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2016 @ 02:55 AM
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I am not a mental health professional. My exposure to the field comes from growing up with a stepfather who was a psychoanalyst and a mother that was a psychotherapist then psychologist. They both taught at universities, had private practice, and authored books with colleagues (mostly text books for university courses). So it was their passion, and all of their friends were in the field as well. I was surrounded by shrinks (and philosophers).
I have been to various therapists myself through time, went through high school always having some sort of mental health professional - a psychotherapist, a psychiatrist, a hypnotherapist.... I went through psychoanalysis as an adult.
I have not ever been diagnosed as having any specific disorder, as far as I have been told. I've been through testing at various intervals, and at sixteen was told the tests indicated "possible borderline" - but then they said that is sort of a typical result for teenagers (prone to being hypersensitive because of hormonal changes).

I just was surrounded with the idea that everyone needs a shrink.. that it is part of psychological hygiene, like brushing your teeth. Instead of talking to friends when I had concerns, I went to my therapist.

I have a half brother that has been diagnosed with ADHD, and Narcissistic Personality Disorder - he's now a homeless drug addict who is in and out of prison. He has serious problems, and has since he was a toddler! My parents lost a lot of friends because by the time he was three, no one could stand being in the same room with him.

I am sceptical of the whole field in general, because from what I witnessed, there is no stable or reliable way to measure anything when it comes to the psyche. This is soft science, and that used to be more recognized by my parents generation. They embraced the notion that a patient or client will only get as much out of treatment as they want to - mental sickness is a choice, if even on very very deep levels, and only the will and effort to heal will make any difference. "It doesn't matter how many therapists there are to screw in the lightbulb, the lightbulb must want to screw itself in".

But then it became about drugs, and mental illness became a purely physiological thing, and I feel like psychology really doesn't exist anymore. But I remember the days when they'd say they were seeing a correlation between chemical imbalances and states like depression, but didn't actually have any evidence of cause and effect. The chemical imbalance might be a result of psychological activity (your thoughts influencing your body). But now, to listen to the young mental health professionals, it all starts with chemicals. Just take the right pill, and your problem is solved!

I suspect the pharma companies played a part in this revolution, and it was easy because no one really wants to face their own responsibility in their emotional suffering - the old soft science was not adapted to the mass consumer.

I have seen that there can be some people who have a natural ability to help others heal psychologically, they can work miracles. Some others have absolutely no ability at all, and no amount of education changes that.
Unfortunately, there is a large number of people who don't have that ability, are rather troubled themselves, but go into the business (projecting their own problems onto willing patients).

I don't trust mental health professionals much today. The drug idea doesn't seem to work - that's how my brother became a meth and oxy head. I like some concepts of behavioral therapy that are becoming more popular... I think bringing together body and mind is the best idea- I like combining physical movement with mental exercises. I find it more effective in bringing about change.

But then we end up back with the oldest notions - that a healthy body leads to a healthy mind. The physical inactivity leads the mind to creating destructive loops. Maybe our grandparents were right about that?



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: Hefficide
a reply to: Quasiscientist
As for a psychologist telling you that there's no such thing as a chemical imbalance? All I can say is find a new psychologist because that is empirically incorrect. Take mental illness of the table and we're still left with things like diabetes or thyroid problems which are chemical imbalances.

Ideally if you are seeing both a psychiatrist and a psychologist then they should be working in tandem with the psychiatrist handling your medication and your psychologist handling behavior modification and talk therapy.


Unfortunately, I no longer quite have the luxury to go around looking for another psychologist, or any other doctor.

I've been recently receiving some e-mails from my psychologist telling me that he's not willing to help me deal with my psychiatrist.

In one e-mail my psychologist wrote:


Furthermore, since you indicated clearly in your previous e-mail that you could not afford to pay for my services, I consider your further efforts to approach me and request my "help" as a solicitation to work for free.

Since I do not work for free, and you are not receiving therapy from me, I suggest you stop writing me.

If you can afford to, please go back to "*NAME REDACTED" and to Dr. *NAME REDACTED* who may see you based on the insurance you have, or the money you have.

Please do not continue to ask for my help via e-mail. This is not the way to obtain help, and you know it.

Therapy is how you can obtain help, and I am repeating myself when I tell you to make arrangements to obtain the necessary finances to get therapy. Don't ask me to work for free, and definitely, do not continue with this exchange.


It's an e-mail that I received from the psychologist who tested me for personality disorders back in July of this year. He's basically telling me here, "you don't have any money to pay me? Boo-#ing-hoo. Too bad, so sad. # off." And I wasn't even asking to receive "free therapy" from him through e-mail, I only wanted him to answer some of my questions (particularly questions in regards to my psychiatrist's strange behavior towards me, questions that my psychologist just kept repeatedly dodging in my e-mails.) So, yeah. This pretty much confirms what I've suspected for years: it all comes down to profit.

The point of the matter is that I already paid that guy $700 for 7 hours of his time, and most of the time was spent on me filling out the MMPI-2 along with a bunch of other tests.

After I was done with those tests, I still had hundreds of questions running through my mind but the guy just kept cutting me off. I was trying to tell him about my psychiatrist's strange behavior and was hoping for answers from someone, and he just kept interrupting me. This guy at some point even told me, "see, you have all of these questions but no one has ever taken the time to answer them. So you've been left alone with your own paranoid ideas. But I'm here now to listen to you." Except he wouldn't listen. Instead he just keep interrupting me, and then there would be these awkward silences lasting somewhere between 20-40 seconds where I'd try to think of something relevant to say without giving him the chance to interrupt me again.

So once all of that was over, I tried asking some of those same questions to him through e-mail, but once again he just kept dodging them. For example, I tried asking him what "schizotypal personality style" should mean to me, and if there was somewhere I could read about it (like how "schizotypal personality disorder" is on the DSM-5, I figured that "schizotypal personality style" must have been on some book or web site or something to read about.) Instead he'd just get defensive and say things like, "I don't know where you can read about your personality style. Why would you pay good money for an expert opinion and disregard it?" He's also told me, "I'm not your therapist, I was your evaluator. Please do not make me switch roles." I wasn't even asking for free therapy. I just wanted some answers.

I guess what's bothering me was not that I was expecting on receiving “free therapy” through e-mail from my psychologist (let's call him: “Dr. Va”), but I was simply hoping that he might be able to answer some of my questions that were left unanswered during the sessions of July of 2016. My psychiatrist (let's call him: “Dr. Ch”) seems to be completely disregarding what Dr. Va wrote on my psychological evaluation report (which I made sure to make copies of to hand over to Dr. Ch back in August), in particular the following:


Some of his vegetative symptoms appear to be somewhat mitigated by the prescription of a psycho-stimulant (Adderall), which has been used on a regular basis.



There were no questions raised regarding his reality testing, no hallucinations reported, and no delusions noted either, failing to support a psychosis hypothesis (including all Schizophrenic disorders).



He was advised to continue to attend his regular meetings with his psychiatrist (currently, Dr. Ch) who prescribes Adderall


According to Dr. Ch, I am now experiencing “delusions” and he wants to stop prescribing Adderall altogether. After some discussion, I managed to convince Dr. Ch to keep prescribing me Adderall, and he agreed, but he lowered the dosage from 60 mg daily down to 40 mg daily. He also told me that he's planning on gradually lowering the dosage of Adderall until I am no longer taking it. Apparently, the Adderall seems to be what is causing my “delusions”. This goes against what Dr. Va wrote on my psychological evaluation report that I am neither experiencing delusions nor hallucinations. Dr. Ch is also disregarding Dr. Va's advice that I should continue taking Adderall, despite what Dr. Va wrote about it mitigating some of the vegetative symptoms of my depression. I even told him what Dr. Va told me that I “definitely did not imagine” all of that stuff that happened with some of the other providers at Dr. Ch's practice, that it definitely was not due to a symptom of a mental disorder (like schizophrenia), or a symptom of a personality disorder (like narcissistic personality disorder), or a symptom of major depressive disorder (like “psychotic depression”), but Dr. Ch disregarded all of it. I find it funny that Dr. Ch's now suddenly deciding that Adderall is causing me to experience “delusions”, when this is the exact sort of thing that I was concerned about before I decided on taking Adderall back in the 1st of July of 2013, when I went to see Dr. Ch for the very first time.

As for the strange behavior of Dr. Ch and the other providers of his practice that I was hoping Dr. Va could help me deal with... I've described most of their behavior towards me in this thread here:

www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread1134355/pg1



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: Quasiscientist

A couple of quick thoughts:

You may want to see an actual neurologist regarding an ADHD diagnosis. We went through this very issue with our son in the local school district when the district psychologist basically bum rushed us to put our son on meds etc. The neurologist basically told my wife and I that we needed to calm down and unless he is falling behind in school, there was not a problem. we are 7 years out from that and he is doing fantastic and we never did anything different. (except tell the district lady to stuff it). A neurologist will bring a more comprehensive diagnosis IMHO and may have better options for treatment etc.

Also, the neurologist may find there is something other than ADHD at work here. I'm not saying they are all like this (or your medical team), but many seem to go right for the ADHD diagnosis and drugs without doing the due diligence needed to rule out other issues.


Edit to add: having read through the complete thread I have to say im a bit appalled by how you are being treated by your healthcare team. I realize it may not be an option but is there anyway you can move to a different team?
edit on 10/23/16 by FredT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2016 @ 02:41 PM
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Just like with doctors of other sorts, they can have different diagnoses. This is not something that can be measured in your blood sample or something.
At the same time, they don't try to sabotage each other either - they are colleagues. Emailing with the patient of another practitioner, reinforcing his suspicion, possible paranoia, or distrust for his therapist would be SO innappropriate! I cannot imagine any practioner doing that (though perhaps one would, there are asshats in every walk of life).

Paying for your treatment insures your engagement and active participation in the process. I believe this is valid (and has been confirmed in studies - that people tend to try less and care less when they get things for free).


edit on 23-10-2016 by Bluesma because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2016 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: FredT
a reply to: Quasiscientist

A couple of quick thoughts:

You may want to see an actual neurologist regarding an ADHD diagnosis. We went through this very issue with our son in the local school district when the district psychologist basically bum rushed us to put our son on meds etc. The neurologist basically told my wife and I that we needed to calm down and unless he is falling behind in school, there was not a problem. we are 7 years out from that and he is doing fantastic and we never did anything different. (except tell the district lady to stuff it). A neurologist will bring a more comprehensive diagnosis IMHO and may have better options for treatment etc.

Also, the neurologist may find there is something other than ADHD at work here. I'm not saying they are all like this (or your medical team), but many seem to go right for the ADHD diagnosis and drugs without doing the due diligence needed to rule out other issues.


I actually have seen a neurologist.

On the first of July of the year 2013, I finally got around to seeking help from the mental health profession when I decided to see my first psychiatrist (let's call him: “Dr. Ch”.) Dr. Ch honestly seemed very tired, inattentive, and possibly falling asleep. He was yawning, nodding off, closing his eyes... at some point he just stopped talking and closed his eyes for about ten seconds while I was describing my symptoms. He would even repeat some of his questions and make me repeat myself several times, almost as if he'd forget my responses to his questions. However, I remained patient throughout the session under the suspicion that my tolerance was intentionally being tested (I suspected that he was possibly assessing me for narcissistic personality disorder.) After attempting to explain my various concerns to Dr. Ch for about fifteen minutes, he prescribed me Adderall for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. I found it a bit strange that I was prescribed Adderall so quickly, especially after I had read about the side-effects of Adderall beforehand and how some people with drug-seeking behavior often seek Adderall for recreational use. After all that I remember thinking to myself: “really? You're prescribing Adderall to me just like that?”

I was concerned that Adderall was not the right medication for me so I ended up seeing a neurologist (let's call him: “Dr. Na”) to see if he could answer several questions, such as; the effects of Adderall on a person who is probably at the onset of schizophrenia or at risk of developing it. I wanted to know if there were any tests that could be done on me, like; a functional Magnetic Resonance Imagery scan on my brain that could probably tell me if I was at the onset of schizophrenia or at risk of developing it. I also wanted to know if there was some way of knowing for sure if I really did have ADHD or something similar (such as narcolepsy), but; Dr. Na told me that for diagnosing something like narcolepsy I would have had to have gotten a very expensive sleep study. Moreover, I asked Dr. Na if a geneticist could help me further regarding these questions and the neurologist told me that it could also be too expensive for me. I ended up paying $700 for a Magnetic Resonance Imagery scan on my brain which simply revealed something called an “arachnoid cyst” (apparently common, harmless, and goes away on its own), moreover; the neurologist prescribed me primidone (which was supposed to help me with my anxiety, essential tremors, and insomnia.


originally posted by: Bluesma
Just like with doctors of other sorts, they can have different diagnoses. This is not something that can be measured in your blood sample or something.
At the same time, they don't try to sabotage each other either - they are colleagues. Emailing with the patient of another practitioner, reinforcing his suspicion, possible paranoia, or distrust for his therapist would be SO innappropriate! I cannot imagine any practioner doing that (though perhaps one would, there are asshats in every walk of life).

Paying for your treatment insures your engagement and active participation in the process. I believe this is valid (and has been confirmed in studies - that people tend to try less and care less when they get things for free).


My psychiatrist works in a practice completely separate from that of my psychologist's.

My psychologist told me (earlier this year, back in July), "all psychiatrists are weird" and that he doesn't like "having to deal with them".

Despite what my psychologist said about psychiatrists, my psychologist is refusing to help me deal with my psychiatrist.

I recently sent the following e-mail to my psychologist pleading for help:


I am not asking for free therapy here. Part of the reason that I agreed to pay you $700 to test me for disorders back in July of this year was because I needed a way to convince my psychiatrist Dr. Ch that I neither have any personality disorder nor schizophrenia (or any other schizophrenic-like disorder) so that he would continue prescribing me Adderall without lowering the dosage. I have absolutely no problem with what you wrote on my psychological evaluation report. I believe everything that you've told me so far.

However, my problem is that Dr. Ch is completely disregarding what you wrote on my psychological evaluation report. This is a real problem for me as he told me that he is going to gradually lower the dosage of Adderall until I am forced to quit it cold turkey. He is ignoring what you wrote on my psychological evaluation report about how Adderall has helped me greatly with my depression, and that I am neither experiencing delusions nor hallucinations. In fact, Dr. Ch admitted to me earlier this month when I last saw him that he does not believe that any of the disorders that I've been diagnosed with (Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social and Anxiety Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) are "real".

Since I already paid you $700 to test me for disorders, I had assumed that you would be able to back me up, and back up what you wrote on my psychological evaluation report. Dr. Ch tried to call you earlier this month when I last saw him, but your answering machine picked up instead. If I were to pay you $100 for at least one hour of your time, would you then be willing in helping me deal with Dr. Ch? Nobody else is willing to help me at this point, not even the law. So the only option that I'm seeing here is that I pay you to help me.

I beg you that you please help me deal with Dr. Ch, and yes, I am aware that you have told me that you think that psychiatrists are "weird" and that you do not like having to deal with them. But if I pay you for your help on this matter, will you then help me? If you do not help me, it will only be further confirmation to my paranoia that you do not believe anything that you've told me because everything that you've written and said has been a lie. If I agreed to begin my psychotherapy treatment with Dr. *NAME REDACTED* next year, and agreed to pay the full $100 for each week, for six months, will you then agree to help me?


This isn't the first time I've sent my psychologist an e-mail like this pleading for help in dealing with my psychiatrist. He continues to ignore me. He has yet to reply to this last e-mail.



posted on Oct, 25 2016 @ 03:09 PM
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A psychologist carries no weight against a psychiatrist... you do realize that a psychiatrist is an MD? A psychologist is not.

I can't imagine the psychologist wants to get involved in this.
Especially if all this you are doing is to try to keep taking a drug that the psychiatrist thinks you should be weened off of. (that you yourself pointed out is often used recreationally).

It's too bad you don't recognize what is innappropriate about what you are asking of the psychologist, I see it all feels rather unjust to you. But it seems obvious to me. Hope you find some sort of solution! Good luck to you!
edit on 25-10-2016 by Bluesma because: (no reason given)



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