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Climate Change: Is Carbon Dioxide the Culprit? No, It's CERN?

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posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Technically, I have only a masters in physics and EE, the physics one I got from UAH, the others from Georgia Tech.

So, I'm not a physicist, since I don't have a PhD. Technically, I'm a transportation mechanic.
But, this guy is a bull# artist of the first water. I doubt he'll have the testicles to show. But if he does, I'll plaster him. It will be fun. It'll be festive. I can't wait. Neon Haze was much more of a challenge. At least I could respect Neon. This guy, he thinks "electro" means "energy".
edit on 28-10-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

You're a little ahead of me. I hold a BSEE from UAH, 2016 EE student of the year, GPA 3,847. I'm working on my Masters in Control Theory / Communications while I intern at CSPAR - will have my major and minor completed completed in the spring. My plans are to go on to a PhD, but I'm going one step at a time. Of course, all that is topping on 35 years of private research and study into physics and electronics.

Nice to meet a fellow UAH alumnus. Do you ever visit?

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

"Transportation mechanic" is an extremely loose term to describe your work. Still out in the desert? Ill be making a road trip along the 40 in a few days. From los angeles to amarillo then down to Austin. But i plan on staying the night in Albuquerque. (Mainly to visit the Dojo "master ken" of ameri do te -a martial arts spoof comedy - films at ) and not that ill see anything at kirkland. But ill still need to get dinner somewhere. Let me know if your local. Otherwise no worries.
edit on 28-10-2016 by BASSPLYR because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 08:55 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Bedlam

You're a little ahead of me. I hold a BSEE from UAH, 2016 EE student of the year, GPA 3,847. I'm working on my Masters in Control Theory / Communications while I intern at CSPAR - will have my major and minor completed completed in the spring. My plans are to go on to a PhD, but I'm going one step at a time. Of course, all that is topping on 35 years of private research and study into physics and electronics.

Nice to meet a fellow UAH alumnus. Do you ever visit?

TheRedneck


We relocated in 2004 or thereabouts. Before that, we had a nice office with a SCIF from Olin King across from where I think the Redhat place is now. Or was.

I got my masters in somewhere around 2002 (tmi). UAH rocks! Also, control theory is awful. I got my EE masters in RF. I've been told by several of my teachers to go ahead and get the PhD, since they would have accepted any of the designs we did as my thesis, but just never had the time.

I'm working on a big honkin' logic problem at the moment. I had considered it insoluble but had an inspiration out of nowhere a few weeks ago and now think I can likely resolve the problems. In which case, I'll retire - it's an encryption issue from hell. That might be my swan song - I'm really tired of being away from home.

eta: I haven't been back to Redstone since our departure. However, I recall at the time we were there that I was very taken with Huntsville. I have a farm near Pensacola but if I ever retired elsewhere, it would be Huntsville/Lake Guntersville.
edit on 28-10-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 09:00 AM
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originally posted by: BASSPLYR
a reply to: Bedlam

"Transportation mechanic" is an extremely loose term to describe your work.


Yet, true. I am but a wrench twister. A complex wrench, to be sure.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 09:04 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

You're right: UAH is awesome! And control theory will send neurons into the fetal position quick! Especially since my instructor / advisor is a leading researcher into sliding mode control and third-generation disciple of Aleksandr Lyapunov. The man comprehends stability like no one i have ever met. Awesome guy though.

I'm assuming you have at least met Dr. Boykin.


If you ever do get by the campus, let me know. We'll devour a dead cow or something.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Bedlam

You're right: UAH is awesome! And control theory will send neurons into the fetal position quick! Especially since my instructor / advisor is a leading researcher into sliding mode control and third-generation disciple of Aleksandr Lyapunov. The man comprehends stability like no one i have ever met. Awesome guy though.

I'm assuming you have at least met Dr. Boykin.


If you ever do get by the campus, let me know. We'll devour a dead cow or something.

TheRedneck


I think my first revelation into control theory was that you just couldn't stabilize a Cuk converter in some modes, because the transfer function was too complex.

It gets worse. A lot worse.

Control theory and its zeroes and poles are a real problem in some very complex, crazy, and unspoken of practical applications. Maybe one day you'll go down the rathole with the eggheads that actually understand this stuff.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I understand completely what you're saying. What you are saying is nothing more or less than what I have read online regarding the power/energy at CERN or other particle accelerators and there is absolutely no danger they say.

What I do have knowledge of is what we don't know!! We do not know what we will create with the unknowns and that accelerators can indeed cause a reaction that was unknown to us at the time. I believe it's wise to leave that possibility on the table.




Cutting-edge science is an exploration of the unknown; an intellectual step into the frontier of human knowledge. Such studies provide great excitement for those of us passionate about understanding the world around us, but some are apprehensive of the unknown and wonder if new and powerful science, and the facilities where it is explored, could be dangerous.
www.livescience.com...

The black hole .. Do we really know all there is to know about black holes and have confirmed without a shadow of doubt Hawkings Radiation is a fact?


The shield against that hypothetical danger is Hawking radiation. Proposed in 1974 by Steven Hawking, Hawking radiation is essentially the evaporation of a black hole caused by its interactions with particles created in the vicinity of the hole. While black holes will absorb surrounding material and grow, an isolated black hole will slowly lose mass.



I'm not so sure.

Then we have Strangelets... No one knows if they exist and there is no evidence of such... YET.


But there is no evidence that strangelets are real, so that might be enough to keep some people from worrying. However, it's still true that the LHC is a machine of discovery and maybe it could actually make a strangelet … well, if they really exist. After all, strangelets haven't been definitively ruled out and some theories favor them. However, an earlier particle accelerator called the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider went looking for them and came up empty.




This article I am referencing here leads one to believe it is 100% safe. Because of the unknowns I think it's naive to say it is 100% safe. Wishful thinking more than fact.

CERN's first parcile accelerator began with the 600 MeV Synchrocyclotron (SC), built in 1957. And was up and going smashing protons in 59. The ring (ISR) was then built in 63 and began using it, I think, in 1971.

I think this is wonderful achievement!! I love physics!! It's mind boggling and have no clue about the math but I love reading about it and trying to understand the quantum level. I'm a go to the roots type of girl always wanting to get to the bottom of things and this does it for me. lol

Also keeping in mind this can open up so many unknowns we haven't even thought of. I am not stating the different theories one by one that can happen because I think there is more to it than that. We have to keep an open mind to the possibilities of this Universe that doesn't seem to come without surprises on the daily.

There is a real debate going on about our weather, oceans, wildlife extinctions, etc.... We can theorize the why's and how's but at the end of the day, we really do not know. We know the weather is driven by the Sun but what other factors come into play is the debate.

Instead of narrowing the problem to particle accelerators I believe it would be wise to say the Nuclear Industry isn't safe and it's agenda in the political arena should make one really ponder.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Oh, I'm already in that rathole. What you're describing is the very reason sliding mode control exists. It allows precise control of higher-order transfer functions through total dynamic collapse.

Next semester I'm scheduled for Optimal Control theory. From what I have been told by the professor for that class, it treats controls as wave functions to optimise efficiency. Sound interesting! I'm really looking forward to it.

I think I'm going to skip the thesis and go for extra classes instead. I can always publish my work myself (IEEE member), and there's so many aspects left to learn. I don't want to use my PhD major for control theory; I was actually thinking about RF for that. I have an idea I am developing for a multi-purpose robotic base using group intelligence to do remote exploration and disaster relief... that should produce a few decent papers. I am trying to design an MIMO analog sliding mode control circuit to improve response and transition time on a force-based leg design with 5 degrees of freedom, plus allow for variations in the Lyapunov stability equations to increase robustness under unknown conditions.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 09:54 AM
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Well, hell. HA!

I already told you guys I'm just a Realtor. You guys know more than me in this field. I'm a total outsider looking in and when people from the outside tell me about their knowledge in my field of Real Estate it can be quite comical.

So.....

With that said I will continue to state my opinion regardless and you guys can keep me afloat to the experience your knowledge does possess.

All I ask is you go easy on me and understand I am only trying to learn and although I may be hard headed... I'm still just learning and your delivery as a teacher is important when teaching someone what you know.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: MamaJ

The guy sounds like a whack job to me.

C.E.R.N and our Sun are not exactly synonymous in construction, effect or energy output. Kind of like comparing a party popper to a nuclear bomb really.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: MamaJ

Please, please stay with the conversation! Never, ever, stop questioning. I worked my way through two AS degrees as a math tutor; I'll be happy to explain anything you don't understand. My claim to fame was I could get anyone through calculus... anyone.

Science is all based on very simple concepts. The fancy words are just shortcuts we use when the math gets screwy.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

You know how kids drive you crazy when they are around the age of 3 and 4 always asking why. Yeah, I never out grew that.

I have a scientific mind with a mystic side. I do not have the patience to do math. I can do math in real estate but when it comes to math in college I couldn't get past Algebra!!! No kidding, it's that bad. I had very bad teachers and couldn't settle my thoughts long enough to understand and ended up frustrated to the point of tears most days. I dropped out of college and began selling real estate.

I look at it like this, it wasn't meant to be.

My son is 19 and has the science and math down like a genius. He self taught in Calculus and Trig in High School and is studying to be an Archaeologist. He is the ONLY one besides the people here on ATS I can collaborate with regarding the abstract.

This dude may be a quack. I still appreciate anyone quack or not trying to understand the world around us. We are always in need of free thinkers to keep us questioning.

Makes me think of a quote by Einstein.. “Imagination is more important than knowledge.”

My mom had books of Einstein growing up. I used to read about time in high school and wonder how in the world such a man could think on these levels. She used to tell me I was crazy like him and reminded me he and I share our birth date. I think that may have inspired me to be different or maybe I was just born that way. I've always thought of things that are out there and when I would talk about these things people would look at me like I was crazy. For this reason my son is a breath of fresh air. lol



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
Oh, I'm already in that rathole. What you're describing is the very reason sliding mode control exists. It allows precise control of higher-order transfer functions through total dynamic collapse.

Next semester I'm scheduled for Optimal Control theory. From what I have been told by the professor for that class, it treats controls as wave functions to optimise efficiency. Sound interesting! I'm really looking forward to it.
TheRedneck


Oddly enough, there are practical applications for this that you don't yet know about.

When you get to the part where you sign up to interview for jobs, if you get a really oddball nonsense job offer for governmental positions where the guy makes an offhand bizarre comment to share with you 'real physics' TAKE HIM UP ON IT. Huntsville is one of the places you MIGHT get the offer.

MSFC and another local Huntsville gubmental group are the two I got the same at-the-time lame sounding stuff from. I made the mistake of declining, and wasted nearly five years at Los Alamos on. (well, not really a waste, but just wait)

Control theory is one of the big hairy deals of the future. That, and metamaterials. And metric engineering.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:38 AM
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originally posted by: MamaJ
Well, hell. HA!

I already told you guys I'm just a Realtor.



There's no 'just' anything.

I'm just a mechanic. And that's totally true, mas o menos.
edit on 28-10-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Oooh metric engineering i like that idea. Polarized vacua sciences among other things?



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: MamaJ


I had very bad teachers and couldn't settle my thoughts long enough to understand and ended up frustrated to the point of tears most days.

Therein lies the problem. If I had a dime for every time I have heard that story from someone I wound up getting to love math, I'd retire and drive down to visit Bedlam myself. Pensacola is nice this time of year.


Makes me think of a quote by Einstein.. “Imagination is more important than knowledge.”

Therein lies the true source of Einstein's genius: his ability to formulate and carry out experiments virtually in his mind, before testing them in reality. That allowed him a flexibility that normal physics does not allow.

Indeed, I have considered some of his thought experiments myself in my research, and I believe their interpretations are incomplete. Perhaps some day I will get the funds/time/desire to dig deeper into that. Until then, well, it's fun to think.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: BASSPLYR
a reply to: Bedlam

Oooh metric engineering i like that idea. Polarized vacua sciences among other things?


Down the rabbit hole you go. Along with the rest of it.



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Oh,I am seeing applications every day, believe me. I am also seeing possibilities.

The 'standard' today is to think of processing in terms of digital logic. I believe the best course is to use a combination of analog and digital processing. Each has their strengths and weaknesses, so why not take the strengths from both? For example, digital logic is necessary in high-order data manipulation, such as carrying out tasks or delegating responsibility for tasks among a hierarchy of mechanisms, but on lower level applications, such as individual joint control, analog operates faster with less quantization error. The trick is to have the two separate systems working in unison with each capable of compensating for the weaknesses of the other.

After all, we seem to operate fairly well on what is essentially an analog system. But digital computers can handle calculations at a speed we couldn't hope to achieve in our wildest dreams.

TheRedneck

P.S.: I'm already waiting on that chance encounter...

edit on 10/28/2016 by TheRedneck because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 28 2016 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: Orionx2
LOL... I just...what? It is hard to take anything seriously on ATS when stuff like this is posted.. Seriously...

The usual idiot responses I see!
This is a scientific journal article and no one wants or thinks it should be discussed! That is the LOl of it!A bunch of stupid off topic remarks is all anyone has to offer. This is now the norm it seems so why are you so protective of ATS content!




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