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Curious tilt of the sun traced to undiscovered planet

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posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 02:24 PM
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I've always thought that our planet and its activities are reactively tied together in some way with other objects in our solar system. Now it appears it may be much more than I ever thought. Our solar system is so connected in ways we never thought possible.....well some of us. I read this info today and wow, there is so much that happens beyond our control. We are but particle visitors on a speck of dust. Could a change of a little 6 degrees possibly affect this earth? Who knows? Of course, the bolding below is my addition.




X-rays stream off the sun in this image showing observations from by NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR, overlaid on a picture taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Credit: NASA

Planet Nine—the undiscovered planet at the edge of the Solar System that was predicted by the work of Caltech's Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown in January 2016—appears to be responsible for the unusual tilt of the sun, according to a new study.

The large and distant planet may be adding a wobble to the solar system, giving the appearance that the sun is tilted slightly.

"Because Planet Nine is so massive and has an orbit tilted compared to the other planets, the solar system has no choice but to slowly twist out of alignment," says Elizabeth Bailey, a graduate student at Caltech and lead author of a study announcing the discovery.

All of the planets orbit in a flat plane with respect to the sun, roughly within a couple degrees of each other. That plane, however, rotates at a six-degree tilt with respect to the sun—giving the appearance that the sun itself is cocked off at an angle. Until now, no one had found a compelling explanation to produce such an effect. "It's such a deep-rooted mystery and so difficult to explain that people just don't talk about it," says Brown, the Richard and Barbara Rosenberg Professor of Planetary Astronomy.

Brown and Batygin's discovery of evidence that the sun is orbited by an as-yet-unseen planet—that is about 10 times the size of Earth with an orbit that is about 20 times farther from the sun on average than Neptune's—changes the physics. Planet Nine, based on their calculations, appears to orbit at about 30 degrees off from the other planets' orbital plane—in the process, influencing the orbit of a large population of objects in the Kuiper Belt, which is how Brown and Batygin came to suspect a planet existed there in the first place.

Read more at: phys.org...


So is it an illusion or is it a physical effect? Does the wobble affect us? How does this affect us? And considering this 'Planet Nine' is itself an unproven object, if it isn't Planet Nine, what else could be causing the sun behave this way?

Here's more on Planet Nine from another link:


Assuming it does exist, Planet 9 has been orbiting the sun for billions of years, way way out beyond the orbit of Pluto. It's not coming towards us, it's not throwing objects at us, and it's definitely not going to usher in the Age of Aquarius.

Once again, we get to watch science in the making. Astronomers are gathering evidence that Planet 9 exists based on its gravitational influence. And if we're lucky, the actual planet will turn up in the next few years. Then we'll have 9 planets in the solar system again.

Read more at: phys.org...




posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 02:36 PM
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I'm no expert but I would think an object that far away would need a mass larger than 10 Earths to "wobble" the Sun.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 02:39 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

A "planet" that is in the outer regions of our solar system caused a tilt in the sun? I'm not an astrophysicist but to me, it sounds more like a brown dwarf (based on the mass it would need to have to cause any sort of change in the sun's tilt)



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: In4ormant

precisely my thoughts - perhaps it is a brown dwarf star?



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 02:53 PM
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I'd bet my house it's not Nibiru.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

The theory is not that the Sun has been tilted, but that the planet has affected the orbits of the other planets relative to the Sun.
edit on 10/20/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

A brown dwarf would have been readily apparent to the WISE survey.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux I hope that when Planet Nine is finally discovered it gets a Greco Roman name. Vulcan/Hephaistos, Persephone/Proserpina... Those are my votes.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: FamCore

A brown dwarf would have been readily apparent to the WISE survey.


Ahh, so it is Niburu. Phage, I never pegged you for one of "those" folks.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:12 PM
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So we got an asteroid belt and the Kuiper belt out beyond the dwarf planet pluto. I always used to think the solar system extended out to pluto, but was I mistaken? Is this the "inner system"? Will the discovery of a large planet outside Kuiper belt maybe make us rethink what's the inner system?

EDIT: I just googled and I see the "inner system" is everytijng up to and including the asteroid belt. Everything beyond that, starting with Jupiter, is the "outer solar system". Beyond Neptune is termed the "Trans-Neptunian region."

The edge of the solar system--and the beginning of interstellar space--is explained here:
en.wikipedia.org - Solar System...

The point at which the Solar System ends and interstellar space begins is not precisely defined because its outer boundaries are shaped by two separate forces: the solar wind and the Sun's gravity. The limit of the solar wind's influence is roughly four times Pluto's distance from the Sun; this heliopause, the outer boundary of the heliosphere, is considered the beginning of the interstellar medium.[55] The Sun's Hill sphere, the effective range of its gravitational dominance, is thought to extend up to a thousand times farther and encompasses the theorized Oort cloud.

Note that even in interstellar space the sun exerts a gravitational influence, extending out to "a thousand times farther" tahn the heliopause. This encompasses the theorized Oort cloud:
en.wikipedia.org - Oort cloud...

The Oort cloud (/ˈɔːrt/ or /ˈʊərt/,[1] named after the Dutch astronomer Jan Oort), sometimes called the Öpik–Oort cloud,[2] is a theoretical cloud of predominantly icy planetesimals believed to surround the Sun to as far as somewhere between 50,000 and 200,000 AU (0.8 and 3.2 ly).

edit on 10/20/2016 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:17 PM
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just my opinion - i is not an astronomer - but i am an engineer ,

and what utter twaddle

the forces required to have ANY effect on a body the mass of the sun - would have a massive effect on commets // the asteroid // kuiper belts and all the inner plannets - before even affecting the suns mass

oh - and it cannot be detected directly by any current telecope technology = the cherry on top

PS - i would welcome any coherent rebutall by someone who actualy understands astrophysics - who can explain to me why i am wrong



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: FamCore

The theory is not that the Sun has been tilted, but that the planet has affected the orbits of the other planets relative to the Sun.


I understand they are talking about the offset to the sun by our planets. It gives the appearance that the sun is tilted.

Would it not take a mass far greater than the sun to negate the suns' gravitational pull and offset the planets from that far away??

Something doesn't add up to me.
edit on 20-10-2016 by In4ormant because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

Jeez. Who wrote this article?

Planet Nine is predicted to have 10 times the mass of Earth, not size. This would make it about 3 times as large as earth. That means that Nine is smaller than Neptune.

And (a planet's) angular momentum certainly does not equal the mass of an object multiplied by its distance...



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: In4ormant




Would it not take a mass far greater than the sun to negate the suns' gravitational pull and offset the planets from that far away??

The Sun's gravitational pull is not negated. Planetary orbits are indeed affected by other planets.

I would imagine that the model used by Batygin and Brown got gravity right. But that doesn't mean the theory is correct.

edit on 10/20/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

Ok...seems as if it is time to make sure that everyone understands the following. Nothing on, or about the sun is changing due to this object. For those saying "it's got to be at least as big as X number of earths" or jumping to the brown dwarf assumption, whoa. Calm yourselves.

For your information this potential discovery, merely EXPLAINS a difference between how mathematical models of our solar system as we know it behave, and how it ACTUALLY behaves, and has done since very shortly after the formation of the solar system in the first place.

We will not find ourselves hammering into the surface of Venus, or catapulted out into the depths of the space between stars, over this object. Oh, and it is worth pointing out, that all the planets in the solar system operate to balance and imbalance one another, so any random one of them being missing from the solar system, would result in a very different system than the one we are living in, regardless of which one went missing, or how dense it is...ok?




posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 05:34 PM
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So if this planet is out there on different orbit than all the other planets, could that orbit ever bring it close to the inner solar system?



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: In4ormant
I'm no expert but I would think an object that far away would need a mass larger than 10 Earths to "wobble" the Sun.

Agreed. I don't think the calculations are all that accurate.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

It was not the Sun which was wobbled.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
It was not the Sun which was wobbled.

Although... a slight wobble of a star (Doppler spectroscopy) is how some pre-Kepler Telescope exoplanets were found, no? I wonder if we can get a good wobble measurement of our own Sun.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: goou111

No.
www.space.com...:*



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