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In 18 Nations, Women Cannot Get a Job Without Their Husband’s Permission

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posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 05:40 AM
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In 18 countries, married women cannot get a job without their husband’s permission: Bahrain, Bolivia, Cameroon, Chad, Congo, Gabon, Guinea, Iran, Jordan, Kuwait, Mauritania, Niger, Qatar, Sudan, Syria, United Arab Emirates, West Bank and Gaza and Yemen.

...

In 30 countries, married women cannot choose where to live, and in 19 they are legally obligated to obey their husbands.

Women in the Middle East and North Africa face the most wide-ranging constraints, including laws that prohibit women from applying for a passport or getting a job without their husband’s permission. The region is home to 11 of the world’s most restrictive economies: Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iran, Yemen, Iraq, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Oman, Syria, Qatar and Kuwait.
SOURCE


Why doesn't the world demand sanctions for things such as what's described above? Sanctions worked to stop Apartheid in South Africa.


In 1986 – about 40 years after the beginning of Apartheid – South Africa's most important trad- ing partners (the USA, the EC, and Japan) imposed economic sanctions. During the course of the 1985 debt crisis, the time seemed to have arrived to finally force the Apartheid regime to its knees by economic sanctions.
LINK


Why can't that be done concerning women's rights? It goes beyond women's rights, the problem is really female rights:

Why are child brides a blind spot for humanity?

'Selling' Children Is a Radical Form of Religion

I have a theory that Christians don't want to meddle in other's ability to practice religion. I think they collectively believe that if they intrude on other's right to practice religion, the same logic will be used against them one day.

There's a huge problem with that line of thinking. If a religion (whether it's Satanism, Christianity, or Islam) is destroying the lives of people, it needs to be stopped. What is more destructive than denying the rights of an entire gender?




posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 05:54 AM
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Thank you for the thread. It is a subject to think about. I believe sanctions would be a waste because this about religion(s). The mothers just have to get sick of it, stand and unite, suffer and die for their cause. Just like their religious men would.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 06:00 AM
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It is a difference but is it our place to tell other cultures how to live.

It was not that long ago that these very same restrictions applied to almost all nations.

So, when did women in the US get the same rights. Equal pay was in the 60s I think.

Perhaps if we gave them some breathing space and stopped dropping bombs on their heads, they may have a chance to grow their society. Perhaps their inability to get there is partly because other countries support the people at the top.

Leave them alone for a while and let them go at their own pace.

Stop interfering.

One other thing ... I wonder what would happen if the women could honestly vote on the issue. Would they want the change.

P

edit on 19/10/2016 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 06:04 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

The West should do more.

You don't hang around someone who you believe is a bad person. If nations don't believe in our morals such as universal human rights then we shouldn't be their friends.

South Africa changed it's choon as mentioned. Human rights should always become before religious rights (in the west anyways) we shouldn't pick and choose when it's applicable, what is it we need that allows us to slip on what has become more than ideals. Human rights is a fact worldwide and some nations abuse the rights apparantly afforded to all human beings.

Some of our biggest trading "partners" have a horrid track record of oppression... Like China.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 06:06 AM
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My auntie has six kids and my uncle barely allowed her to have a small part time job a few years back. And yes we live in California.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 06:09 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358

That's a good question, how much should we interfere or if at all.

Stick to what we know, all humans should be treated the same and afforded the same rights.

What happens today isn't working, we cannot turn a blind eye whilst we make trade-deals. Trade with someone else.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 06:09 AM
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a reply to: Profusion


Bahrain, Bolivia, Cameroon


blinks - bolivia ???????????????????????????????

i could guess at least 12 of the list - just on ` instinct ` - but one learns something new every day

bolivia ???

will have to attemt to google WHY ?? laters 0 as i cannot think of a reason right now

S&F for the education



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 06:11 AM
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originally posted by: RAY1990
a reply to: Profusion

The West should do more.

You don't hang around someone who you believe is a bad person. If nations don't believe in our morals such as universal human rights then we shouldn't be their friends.

South Africa changed it's choon as mentioned. Human rights should always become before religious rights (in the west anyways) we shouldn't pick and choose when it's applicable, what is it we need that allows us to slip on what has become more than ideals. Human rights is a fact worldwide and some nations abuse the rights apparantly afforded to all human beings.

Some of our biggest trading "partners" have a horrid track record of oppression... Like China.


The west should also be careful how much it preaches sometimes. It was only around 60 years ago in North America to an extent Europe that being black never mind what your gender made many jobs unrealistic as options, at the same time to be found to be homosexual would be the death of your career, especially as you could be prosecuted.

60 years, well within the lifetime of many.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 06:19 AM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
It is a difference but is it our place to tell other cultures how to live.


A culture that deprives human rights is not a legitimate culture. It sounds to me like you're a believer in cultural relativism.


Cultural relativism is the view that all beliefs, customs, and ethics are relative to the individual within his own social context. In other words, “right” and “wrong” are culture-specific; what is considered moral in one society may be considered immoral in another, and, since no universal standard of morality exists, no one has the right to judge another society’s customs.
LINK


All you have to do is look at extreme examples to see that your theory isn't valid. Everyone outside of ISIS and its few supporters agrees that it must be stopped. The same thing happened concerning the Nazi culture.

If a country like Saudi Arabia openly acted like the Nazis, the world would stop them in a heartbeat. Everyone with the ability to think knows that their culture is abhorrent.

Apparently you think that ISIS' culture should be respected just like every other culture?
edit on 19-10-2016 by Profusion because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 06:32 AM
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My wife would love me to forbid her to get a job. She hates the fact that she has to work for a living, instead of doing the things she loves, and quite frankly so do I. The only thing that keeps us at it is that the alternative to working is worse. Were both holding out for a lottery win.
edit on 19-10-2016 by CulturalResilience because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 07:05 AM
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Man hillary Clinton has taken money from countries on that list. Makes you think that she doesn't care about women's rights as much as her campaign says she does.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 07:10 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Bolivia should not be in there. Women do not fare well in many regards there, but they do not need their husband's permission to get a job. 64% iof the workforce is female and 30% of the parliament.
edit on 19-10-2016 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 07:19 AM
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a reply to: Profusion

Mauritania, where women do make slow progress, all forms of discrimination against women were made illegal in 2001 and they do not need permission to work.


You might want to check this listical.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 07:27 AM
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originally posted by: avgguy
Man hillary Clinton has taken money from countries on that list. Makes you think that she doesn't care about women's rights as much as her campaign says she does.


Any excuse to throw her name in. Many on this listical do not belong or the information is outdated.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 07:38 AM
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As an atheist I have learned one major lesson, don't try to change other peoples faith.
It leads to extremism.

Those ladies are free to protest and fight for their freedoms just like the majority of ladies in the 1st world had to do many years ago.

The women are probably happy following their religious teachings the way they do, indoctrination is a terrible thing.
Leave them be, how do you know they're unhappy? They are probably pretty content with the way things are.
You don't know best, because you aren't them.

Besides, some ladies need t be kept on a leash

edit on 19-10-2016 by GreenGunther because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-10-2016 by GreenGunther because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-10-2016 by GreenGunther because: How many spelling mistakes can one man make??



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 08:31 AM
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'Selling' Children Is a Radical Form of Religion


it also seems to have a connection to poverty though. even christian western nations were known to have their kids sold, traded off. heck, one could kind of say that our history of child labor was a form of selling the kids. someone who is willing to send their little children into the coal mines to plant dynamite into the small crevices would have to be either desperate to put food on the table or a selfish greedy sob! I tend to go for the first explanation.
many of those countries that you have listed are rather oil rich, with their oil bringing in alot of wealth. but the leaders and royalty of those countries seem to be living in golden palaces while the people are in proverty...
and, many wars have been fought by the US to keep those leaders in power, or replace them with someone more suitable to us if they go astray.
end the harshness of the proverty and you will free the people to live a kinder, less harsh life.
bombing countries into oblivion just make living more difficult for the people...

and, the women in some of those countries are making moves to freedom..




posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 08:44 AM
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It's like Hillary says "Women's rights are human rights, and human rights are women's rights".




posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: uncommitted

The battle for rights is a long and hard one still going on, it has no bonderies or borders and it's history is scattered amongst nations old and dead.

I hear you though, their is a bittersweet irony in talking about human rights elsewhere when our own recent history has plenty of inequality. But as I said human rights transcend borders and nations. Certian nations might be pioneers of human rights but eventually every human wants them, then again you will alwayd get superstitious cultures.

West Africa and ebola, that is a good recent case of superstition being a catalyst for a bad situation. Without jumping into much detail nations sometimes like a bit superstition, it helps shift blame. Culture can be a huge barrier in delivering what the west considers a human right, the right to healthcare.

Sometimes we have to meddle to get things done, the alternative isn't acceptable.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 11:23 AM
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Why not let all the women do the work for a while.

I think men have earned a break.



posted on Oct, 19 2016 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: corvuscorrax

hey dependency comes with a price tag, are you willing to pay the price?




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