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Wind-powered device can produce 11 gallons per day of clean drinking water from the air

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posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:15 AM
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A new device developed by VICI-Labs, in collaboration with UC Berkeley and the National Peace Corps Association, aims to provide a sustainable source of clean safe water for the millions without a reliable water supply.

Source

Website: Link

Here’s a thought, put your guns down for a day and use the money saved to buy and distribute as many of these as possible. Instead of taking a life, why not potentially save one?


The WaterSeer is relatively simple device, designed to be operated without an external power input, and without the need for costly chemicals or maintenance, that can 'pull' moisture from thin air and condense it into water using the temperature difference between the above-ground turbine and the collection chamber installed six feet underground. The potable water can then be delivered to the surface for use via a simple pump and hose, and the device is said to be able to produce up to 11 gallons per day, even in arid regions.

The best part is, the entire device costs only $134 dollars, though I wouldn't be surprised if someone figures out a way to make it even cheaper. Seems like a pretty quick and easy solution to a problem that millions of people living in poverty are constantly faced with.


"Previous solutions based on condensation use a great deal of energy, usually in the form of diesel-powered compressors and evaporators. They are basically big air conditioners. Some use powerful and dangerous chemicals that can damage the immediate environment. They are also difficult to move, require high technical skills to operate, and expensive to operate and maintain. WaterSeer uses no power or chemicals of any kind. It is completely non-polluting and its simple construction is inexpensive and maintenance free."


The concept is nothing new, but the design is what makes this device special. The only thing stopping this thing from working is a lack of wind, which could easily be solved by devising a way to manually power the internal fan. A bicycle or hand crank sounds fitting.


The current model of WaterSeer, which is based on a unit first developed and then tested at the UC Berkeley Gill Tract Farm this spring, will be field-tested in collaboration with the National Peace Corps Association over the next 6 months, with the intent of shipping the finalized design within the next year.

The designers are currently seeking crowd-funding and I don’t normally say this, but I suggest you contribute if you can. Their hope is to generate enough pre-orders to facilitate a “buy one, give one” program that will send a device to a family in the developing world for every one purchased.

Good on them and shame on those who have failed to act in the past. Take a look around and tell me that anyone who can are doing everything they can to help the developing world. You can't because they aren't. It's time to get our priorities in order, especially when the solution seems so simple.

edit on 17-10-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:21 AM
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Nestle will attempt to buy company and squash it ...
edit on 17-10-2016 by zenartist because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

This looks amazing. I love it when technology is used to solve problems like this.

In the US, this may be a very welcome device for people living in arid climates, for helping with farming during drought, or for folks living off-grid that don't have a stable well or water-source.

I agree that this could save lives. Thank you for posting!!

AB



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Shhh, bottled water companies will make it illegal or really expensive, citing it can be used to distill 'Spirits'.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis


Almost seems to good to be true.

Any idea off the minimum differential between the temperatures of the air, the ground, the humidity and the wind speed?



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:31 AM
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I'm not sure how well this will be received. There's no money in selling a device that provides people with clean drinking water for life. The real money is in mailing them a utility bill, every single month, for the rest of their lives.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: BlueShaman
I'm not sure how well this will be received. There's no money in selling a device that provides people with clean drinking water for life. The real money is in mailing them a utility bill, every single month, for the rest of their lives.



It would seem that this is not a system intended for a suburban dweller. Out in the middle of nowhere maybe. Sell enough of them and they would put a meter on it and or, most probably, tax you with a required license.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:57 AM
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I guess doesn´t work well in cold temperatures like in north in winter time.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis


The only thing stopping this thing from working is a lack of wind, which could easily be solved by devising a way to manually power the internal fan. A bicycle or hand crank sounds fitting.


Hmm... It would be interesting to calculate how much water you would lose through perspiration peddling such a thing in hot climates. Still, cool tech nonetheless.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: dollukka
I guess doesn´t work well in cold temperatures like in north in winter time.

Throw a make-shift greenhouse over it.


To everybody else, I apologize. I'm at work and will chime in when I can.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 11:10 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

That is really cool. I just wonder how legal these would be as far as any type of taxation or regulations. Still neat nonetheless.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 11:28 AM
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GOOD NEWS STORY ?

I think I've time slipped to another dimension 👍

Great story with all the doom porn going on !

And no mention of THE woman ( debatable)

Righ back to the blood frenzy threads .
edit on 17-10-2016 by Denoli because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Once again you post an awesome new technology or science innovation that I wasn't aware of - thanks, matey!



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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When I first saw this I was as excited as the OP. But someone I know was skeptical and when I searched more on it I found a video with other skeptics. The concept is great (if it works) but there are some questions.

1. Where does the air go once it us pushed down? There doesn't seem to be an explanation for this.
2. Relies on the cold temperature below ground to produce condensation from the "hot" air. Eventually, the ground will warm up
3. It takes a kilowatt to produce 1 gallon of water per hour, this contraption can't produce that
4. There is no working prototype, just animations



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: dollukka
I guess doesn´t work well in cold temperatures like in north in winter time.


The North in winter would not need this device..



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 12:57 PM
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a reply to: Misterlondon

Talking about clean water.. snow is nothing close to clean
is it safe to eat snow



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 01:01 PM
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a reply to: dollukka


is it safe to eat snow


not of it's yellow.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 02:33 PM
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originally posted by: TheFlyOnTheWall
When I first saw this I was as excited as the OP. But someone I know was skeptical and when I searched more on it I found a video with other skeptics. The concept is great (if it works) but there are some questions.

1. Where does the air go once it us pushed down? There doesn't seem to be an explanation for this.
2. Relies on the cold temperature below ground to produce condensation from the "hot" air. Eventually, the ground will warm up
3. It takes a kilowatt to produce 1 gallon of water per hour, this contraption can't produce that
4. There is no working prototype, just animations


I have to agree with you on this. I suppose the air could escape the way it came in when the wind died down, but how will the air go in after reaching maximum resistance due to air pressure? The underground temperature would stay relatively neutral, so what happens in the winter? Does your ground reserve evaporate? This sounds suspiciously similar to the Fontus Airo, and it just doesn't work as described. The catch is, "under optimal conditions". That's their "see, we weren't actually lying" defense.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 04:23 PM
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a reply to: dollukka


Throw a make-shift greenhouse over it.

I was waiting for, “but, wouldn’t that also block the wind?” Just to be clear, I made this awesome picture to show you what I meant. I think it's possible as long as there's enough circulation.


a reply to: Aliensun


Any idea off the minimum differential between the temperatures of the air, the ground, the humidity and the wind speed?


A proof of concept was produced in 2014, producing about 2.3 liter per day using 9 square meters of surface area. Average conditions were a wet bulb humidity of 79% and an air temperature of 62F. Not sure about the wind speed.


When I first saw this I was as excited as the OP. But someone I know was skeptical and when I searched more on it I found a video with other skeptics.

What video are you referring to?

The science behind the concept is readily available. Knock yourself out...


WaterSeer TM extends the lessons learned from the experiments listed below accelerating the condensate process through an innovative structure that maximizes the temperature difference between atmospheric temperature and the surface of the condenser.

In 2011 Girja Sharan, under funding from Gujarat Energy development Agency, Baroda and World Bank conducted atmospheric humidity yield from passive condensers in a coastal arid Area (Kutch, India). He derived the following conclusions based on three month observations:

- Passive condensers extracted significant amounts of water from the air at night in arid regions.

- Passive condensers made of polyethylene mixed with titanium oxide and barium sulfate (PETB) gives much higher yield - nearly 2.5 times- than the galvanized iron and aluminum surfaces under similar ambient conditions.

- PETB condenser can extract moisture from air with lower humidity than the metal condensers alone.

- High humidity, calm winds, clear sky and relatively warm ambient appear to result in higher condensation yields.

Beysens D; Milimouk I; Nikolayev V; Muselli M; Marcillat J. 2003. Using radiative cooling to condense atmospheric vapor: a study to improve water yield, Journal of Hydrology, 276, I - II.

Beysens D; Milimouk I; Nikolayev V; Muselli M; Marcillat J. 2003. Using radiative cooling to condense atmospheric vapor: a study to improve water yield, Journal of Hydrology, 276, I - II.

Sharan G; Hari Prakash 2003. Dew condensation on greenhouse roof at Kothara (Kutch), Research Note, Journal of Agricultural Engineering, Vol. 40(4), October - December, 75-76.

Nikolayev V S; Beysens D; Gioda A; Milimouk I; Katiouchine E; Morel J P 1996. Water recovery from dew. Journal of Hydrology, 182, 19-35.

Nilsson T M J; Vargas W E; Niklasson G A; Granqvist C G. 1994. Condensation of water by radiative cooling, Renewable Energy, Vol 5 (f), 310-317.

Berkowicz S M; Beysens D; Milimouk I; Hensinkveld B G; Muselli M; Wakshal E; Jacods A F G. Urban dew collection under semi-arid conditions: Jerusalem.

Nilsson T. 1996. Initial experiments on dew collection in Sweden and Tanzania, Sol. Energy Mat. Sol. Cells, Vol. 40, 23-32.

Zangvil A 1996. Six Years of Dew Observations in the Negev Desert, Israel. Journal of Arid Environment, 32, 361-371.

Regarding your other questions, I'll do my best.


1. Where does the air go once it us pushed down? There doesn't seem to be an explanation for this.

I’m guessing there's a cycle of upward and downward convection currents, where forced air that is cooling would sink along the sides of the shaft and warm air would travel up the center, similar to the picture below.



2. Relies on the cold temperature below ground to produce condensation from the "hot" air. Eventually, the ground will warm up

Conduction would easily draw out any heat left in the water after condensation took place. I highly doubt there is enough consistent heat energy to offset the cold soils ability dissipate it.


3. It takes a kilowatt to produce 1 gallon of water per hour, this contraption can't produce that

Can you please reference that? The air is naturally cooled by design to it’s dew point, provided the air is humid enough. I also believe that special coatings were used to aid in the condensing process.


4. There is no working prototype, just animations

They've been improving the design ever since and must have recently made enough progress to settle on a design that they know will work. The trick is keeping the price and upkeep to a minimum, while applying the latest technology that will help achieve a result that you know is within reason.


Anyway, those are my quick answers to your questions without looking into it much. I'm of course open to being corrected and always enjoy learning a thing or two from our more adept members.

edit on 17-10-2016 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: TheFlyOnTheWall

as for number 2, no, actually at a certain depth the ground stays the same temperature (I believe it`s around 50 F) all year long.
I want to get one of these to use for watering my vegitable garden.


edit on 17-10-2016 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)




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