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Google added a fact-check feature to help you tell if news stories are accurate

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posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 10:33 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

I don't like Bing because it seems to bring me less results and more ads. Probably because it only pops up when I use Edge and that is rare. I use maxthon and have google set as default. Bing might work better if it got to kow my habits. Google works well for me for that reason. If I want to avoid a search enging 'knowing me', I use Duckduckgo.




posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

This seems like a good tool to use. I have seen the negative responses. It doesn't have the only way one fact checks. It seems like an adjunct to research.



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 12:27 AM
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a reply to: reldra

I've gotten picky about search engines because many of them toss ads as the first result... and often times these are ads/responses based on someone coding "whatever the person is interested in, we have it"...when they don't. I was googling something like malocclusions once and got pages purporting to offer me "the best in malocclusions."

Nowadays they teach how to verify information in search engines in many university courses. What I saw in the Google algorithm was that an article had to contain links to original sources (so you could get away with a link to a newspaper article but not to a blog) - and that the site would be ranked rather than the individual article.

It'll be a work in progress, I expect. What we saw with the search engines was that while they were initially neutral, hackers and businesses (and con men (and women)) started gaming the engines for their own ends. Programmers tweaked the algorithms and the same bunch learned to game that as well.

If you look at it mathematically, it's a rather interesting game of predator and prey. The information hackers want to "get" the prey (eyeballs and purchases and credit card numbers) and the prey doesn't want to be sold to or to be led into scams. What the "prey" wants is fresh information that's useful and correct -- and manipulators would try all sorts of "landing pages" and other tricks to get your eyeballs to their space. (I was part of a scamwatch group at one time that took some of these schemers off the internet... we helped (many did) take down Sanford Wallace. I learned a lot of interesting things while watching them.)



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 12:27 AM
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(wow. ATS really loved my answer... put it up TWICE!
)
edit on 16-10-2016 by Byrd because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 05:48 AM
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Where does google pay its corporate tax, if any?



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 08:04 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: StallionDuck




At first I thought that this could be interesting but then I thought just how much Google was in bed with the dark, secret forces that we call our government.

Did you try it?


Yep! And it's headlining Trump story after Trump story.

I see where "its" head is at already and I've completely lost all interest in it.



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: StallionDuck

Actually, I see a pretty wide mix for Top Stories. Look at the panel on the left. Click "Hillary Clinton."
edit on 10/16/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: StallionDuck

Actually, I see a pretty wide mix for Top Stories. Look at the panel on the left. Click "Hillary Clinton."


I'll do that in a bit. I'll trust you're seeing something I'm not.

Don't ruin that trust Phage!





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