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Great Barrier Reef dead at 25 million

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posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: Bloodydagger

The OP's obituary is horrifying and heartbreaking - even though it's a device to get publicity for the reef's failing health.

Here are the official reports, which tip the scales of truth in the other direction, and sugarcoat it.


1. The latest “Outlook Report” from 2014 - the next isn’t due til 2019-2020.


Great Barrier Reef Outlook Report 2014

…While the corals that build reefs are the most visible natural ‘value’ in the Reef ecosystem, it is the Reef ecosystem as a whole (including seagrasses, mangroves, sandy and muddy communities, coastal wetlands, islands and continental slope depths) that is important.
…the overall outlook for the Great Barrier is poor, has worsened since 2009 and is expected to further deteriorate in the future. Greater reductions of threats at all levels, Reef-wide, regional and local, are required to prevent the projected declines in the Reef and to improve its capacity to recover.
…From 1985 to 2012 coral cover on the mid-shelf and off shore reefs on the Reef declined by almost 50%. The main reasons for this decline have been identified as outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish, cyclones, and thermal stress leading to coral bleaching.


2. The Taskforce Report is about how to spend the Australian government’s money to try and save the reef.


Great Barrier Reef Taskforce Water Science Taskforce May 2016

…In 2009, the Great Barrier Reef was considered to be at a crossroad, with decisions made in subsequent years likely to determine its long-term future. Since then, continuing investment in management of the Reef has had some positive results. …
…the greatest risks to the Great Barrier Reef have not changed. Climate change, poor water quality from land-based run-off, impacts from coastal development, and some remaining impacts of shing remain the major threats to the future vitality of the Great Barrier Reef.
…In recent years, a series of major storms and oods have affected an ecosystem already under pressure. The accumulation of all impacts on the Reef has the potential to further weaken its resilience. This is likely to affect its ability to recover from serious disturbances, such as major coral bleaching events, which are predicted to become more frequent in the future.



edit on 14/10/16 by soficrow because: format

edit on 14/10/16 by soficrow because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: tikbalang


a reply to: Bloodydagger
So the British prisoners killed of the Barrier reef in just a century, amazing..

As an Australian I find that to be an offensive, small-minded, racist comment. Are you trying to troll?
Can you back up your assertion? or is this just diatribe related to some inferiority complex caused by your own confusion regarding national identity ( expat Colonials owned your heritage too didn't they?)

BTW get your basic facts right first mate, you are embarrassing.... it is 'killed off' not 'killed of', convicts-not prisoners, and started to arrive in 1788.

Time to wear my shirt inside out.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 08:01 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Bloodydagger

Um, according to the same article,


The research showed that “22 percent of the coral on the reef died due to the worst mass bleaching event on record.”


So the coral reef is actually 22% dead. 78% of the coral is still surviving.

Sure, it's bad, I mean optimally 100% of the organisms that build up the coral should be alive, but saying that "all of the population is dead" when actually 22% of it has bleached is a bit of an exaggeration.

I smell a tad of sensationalism.

Problem is that 22% is dead and, most likely, not coming back. Such recovery wouldn't be for many years at a minimum. Coral does not recover quickly, and any additional stress will hinder such recovery.

It's kind of a big deal. Almost a fourth of the reef is now dead - for the rest of your life - from an event that happened over a year.

The expectation is that the reef could well be entirely dead by 2025.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 08:21 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 08:29 PM
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Tech glitch
edit on 14-10-2016 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: Bloodydagger




I'm surprised that this isn't posted yet.
i follow dr karl who believes that its been known about for too long, that the point of no return was a while back and, australia's governments best idea was to hope by themselves ignoring it, the public would too.

remember, the great barrier reef is still a huge cash cow for tourism, 'visit the ex great barrier reef' is a tough sell.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 08:30 PM
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originally posted by: jellyrev
a reply to: Bigburgh

Time to start towing icebergs.

If its dead we longer have to worry about it. Can spend the resources elsewhere.


Way ahead of you😊



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: swanne

Sure, it's bad, I mean optimally 100% of the organisms that build up the coral should be alive, but saying that "all of the population is dead" when actually 22% of it has bleached is a bit of an exaggeration.
Bleaching does not equal death of corals. It is a phenomenon whereby the coral polyps expel their symbiotic algae. Corals can recover, but prolonged stress (and bleaching) results in coral death.

90% of the reef has shown the effects of bleaching. 22% of the coral has died (dead) so far. It's likely the other 68% will also die unless something changes for the better.
www.cnn.com...


Coral populations can actually recover quite quickly. But not if the factors which caused the damage are still there.
www.scientificamerican.com...


edit on 10/14/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: Phage

coral reefs are like a forest. Some of it is being born, some of it is dying, some of it is stressed, some of it is thriving. Its the process of life and its happens to all organisms.

Tired of Control Freaks



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 09:14 PM
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a reply to: TiredofControlFreaks



The vast majority of the coral is stressed. A minority of the coral thriving. A large amount of it is dead.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 09:51 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Phage

First of all, we have just recently been witness to fraud perpetuated by environmental activists trying to fund raise by exaggerating the amount of bleaching to the GBR. This is the second time that the phrase "90 something odd percent of the reef is dead or bleached". I am not falling for it.

Actually, bleaching is not the same as "dying' and it is not dead. When the coral ejects the algae and animals that live in it, it provides an opportunity for coral to take on new algae and new animals that are less bothered by warming waters. Its an opportunity to adapt.

The reef is no more dead than a forest after a forest fire. A forest fire is an opportunity for new growth and renewal.

Are you suggesting that carribean reefs can recover from warm temperatures and hurricanes all arriving in sequence over a period of years but not the GBR?

The GBR has been there for millions of years. It survived cold temperatures and temperatures warmer than current temperatures.

Tired of Control Freaks



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: TiredofControlFreaks

Actually, bleaching is not the same as "dying' and it is not dead.
Yes. I know. www.abovetopsecret.com...



The reef is no more dead than a forest after a forest fire. A forest fire is an opportunity for new growth and renewal.
When the stress which causes the bleaching persists, the coral dies. The ecosystem collapses. Fish die. Invertebrates die. The reef dies.



Are you suggesting that carribean reefs can recover from warm temperatures and hurricanes all arriving in sequence over a period of years but not the GBR?
I am suggesting that unless the stressors which cause bleaching go away, the reef dies.



It survived cold temperatures and temperatures warmer than current temperatures.
Ok, So, it will die. Then come back when ocean temperatures decline. Someday. That's comforting.






edit on 10/14/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 10:02 PM
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I'm glad this turned out to be untrue. Reading that the reef was dead was shocking and sad beyond words. So glad it's alive!



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 10:12 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I checked your link about "90 % of the coral reef being bleached". Its from apri 2016 and was part of Green Peace
s funding campaign. It is a lie.

www.couriermail.com.au... b3db81ec65c9768ad4





THE ABC has been panned by mining chiefs and Federal Environment Minister Greg Hunt for using a misleading photograph to highlight coverage of coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef. The national broadcaster’s Triple J Hack website carried a report on damage to Queensland’s natural wonder on ­Wednesday, but featured a dramatic composite image of dead coral that was taken at Flowerpot Rock in American Samoa. It was the same picture that The Courier-Mail last weekend revealed environmental group Greenpeace had used in a tweet linking damage to the Great Barrier Reef with the coal industry. Queensland Resources Council has made a formal complaint to the taxpayer-funded broadcaster over the latest instance. “When The Courier-Mail revealed this Great Barrier Reef ruse last Saturday, Greenpeace themselves even admitted the photo in question was a fake,” QRC chief executive Michael Roche said.


The GBR has survived 25 million years. Why should it die now?

Tired of Control Freks



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 10:19 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake At least he didn't say "environmentalists need to get a life" like Hillary just did,,,,BOOOOM !
But on topic, I went to Belize last year and the reef had turned black over the years, most of it wasn't pretty, some was. Now they are making coral with 3d printers, maybe it will work.

edit on 14-10-2016 by beeeyotch because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 12:56 AM
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a reply to: beeeyotch

I don't want to be nit picky here but isn't Belize near guatamala - that is no where near the Great Barrier Reef.

Tired of Control Freaks



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 01:08 AM
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a reply to: MiddleInitial

You should TRUST scouts we find things...



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: CovertAgenda

It survived for 25MY didnt it?

You sure know how to protect your borders to the outside, maybe its time you looked inwards?

If you find that racist, than i believe you are to privileged..



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 03:07 AM
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originally posted by: cavtrooper7
a reply to: Bloodydagger

Isn't weather stepping up a tad?
Tornados in Oregon.



originally posted by: Bloodydagger
a reply to: cavtrooper7

Sure is. We are seeing some strange weather in America. I remember last year, it was hot and sunny outside at CHRISTMAS here where I live. I don't ever remember a time when that happened.


What is happening to ATS? We get the absolutely tragic news that the Great Barrier Reef has been declared dead and the first two posts are about weather in the U.S., not only that but 7 people star each post? There's a whole world outside of America guys! Those posts should be deletes to prevent drifting off topic!

When I heard about this in 2009 I hoped it would.make the world sit up and pay attention, it would seem that isn't the case. This is such a horrible thing to have happened, as a race we REALLY need to start taking care of our planet...



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: TiredofControlFreaks


I checked your link about "90 % of the coral reef being bleached". Its from apri 2016 and was part of Green Peace
s funding campaign. It is a lie.
False. Did you even read what you posted? It is not about the study, it is about a picture. What I posted is not from Greenpeace. It is about this:
www.coralcoe.org.au...



Why should it die now?
Because the ocean is getting warmer and people are dumping stuff into it.


edit on 10/15/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



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