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Looking for Restaurant Recipes

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posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 04:13 PM
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a reply to: Rookseven

A lot of professional kitchens use microwaves, believe it or not. As a matter of fact, I have a quick recipe for you.
Melt a pat of butter in a microwave safe dish.
Add a little salt, pepper, and garlic to the melted butter.
Toss a nice sized serving of broccoli florets in the butter mixture.
Place the florets in a non zip sandwich bag, place on a plate, and put that in the microwave for two and a half minutes. ( times may vary ). Let stand for two minutes. Enjoy. Another variant is use bold Italian dressing. Try it, and let us know how yours turned out. Peace




posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 04:13 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

We currently have Vietnamese dish on the menu now. The smell of fish sauce is reminiscent of something I cant say here. I'll just say yuck.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

There is no such thing as a commercial kitchen without pests. Even if you have zero, that US Foods or Sysco truck will bring some in. They can live off the glue in boxes for months.

The best you can do is pay your pest control folks on time so they do their job to the best of the industries ability. And call them when the issue becomes problematic in any way (i.e., they crawl out into daylight or begin nesting....you wanna keep them on the ropes as much as possible).

Its just the way it is. And you'd typically be better served ensuring hand washing and food dates are in order.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan


There is no such thing as a commercial kitchen without pests.

I can handle pests. Its their leavings in the grease behind under fixtures.... ewww... some places let that fester for years.

I never knew until I was directly involved in removing these fixtures for scrap metal. Most are made of stainless steel.

I also knew someone that was an exterminator for large chains. He told me... never mind.

One of my favorite recipes , BBQ lemon tarragon chicken.

Boneless chicken breasts chilled over night soaked in Canadian Ginger ale, two crushed lemons, half a chopped yellow onion , half a bottle of Frenchs mustard and freshly chopped Tarragon. Covered and chilled in the fridge.

When cooking, lay down foil on the grill and place chicken on top. Puddle the chicken on the foil with the marinade, it should boil away as its cooking, when the chicken is cooked, remove the foil and grill for a few till the tips just begin to blacken. Brush liberally with Marinade.

Serve. It will be yellow in appearance form the mustard and have a tangy zip from the Ginger Ale. The important things are marinating overnight (to absorb the mustard) and boiling the chicken on the grill on foil boiling in puddles of the Marinade as it cooks.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: Rookseven
The seasonings are exactly what they use at Noodles. You might want to try it before berating it.


No thank you. Any place that uses a microwave to prepare their food is not my kind of restaurant.


If you are in small towns, tourist areas or average restaurants, they all use microwaves. It simply is not possible to cook everything to order. It could not be made fresh. If you cook large quantities if you you have a heavily served dish, you reheat in microwaves.

Today a lot of the actual cooking is done in microwaves even baked potatoes.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: PeachesNCream

Actually it's the act of cooking that drains the nutrients, microwaving it can actually be beneficial oddly enough :-)



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 06:37 PM
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Making this for dinner, with a side of roasted baby broccoli and rice.

🐔Chicken Wings:
Marinade:
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
1 tbsp Soy Sauce
Juice of a lime
Glaze:
2 tsp sesame oil
1 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp kocuchang
3 tbsp honey
2 tsp lime Juice
Garlic

Directions:
1. Marinade for several hours
2. Bake at 425 for 20 minutes
3. Make Glaze, small saucepan and whisk on low 8-10 until it reduces down and gets nice and thick
4. After 20 min, pull chicken and brush wings with glaze
5. Pop back in oven at 425 for 8-10 min



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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You said Indian food right? Here's one that is a favorite of mine at the better Indian restaurants.

Lamb Korma

2 cups onions, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon gingerroot, grated
1⁄4 cup usli ghee or 1⁄4 cup cooking oil
1 teaspoon garam masala
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground mace
3⁄4 teaspoon salt
3⁄4 teaspoon ground cinnamon (I use a little less than this)
3⁄4 teaspoon ground turmeric
3⁄4 teaspoon paprika (I use Sweet Paprika)
1⁄4 teaspoon ground red pepper (or leave it out altogether if you don't want heat)
1 1⁄2 lbs boneless lamb, cut into 3/4 inch pieces
1⁄4 cup water or more if you want, I like about 3/4s cup myself
1 cup sour cream (room temperature)
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour ( or leave this out to make it gluten-free)
2 tablespoons cilantro, snipped


In a large skillet cook chopped onion, and gingerroot in hot Usli Ghee or cooking oil till the onion is tender but not brown, add crushed garlic to sautee for a moment.

Combine garam masala, cumin, mace, salt, cinnamon, turmeric,paprika, and red pepper; stir into the onion mixture. Remove from the pan.

Brown the meat, half at a time, in hot Usli Ghee or oil. Add more Usli Ghee or oil to the skillet, if necessary. Drain off the excess fat. Return the meat and onion mixture to the pan.

Add 1/4 cup water or a bit more. Cover and simmer about 1 1/4 hours or until the meat is tender, stirring frequently to keep the mixture from sticking. If the mixture gets too thick while cooking, add 1 more tablespoon of water.

Stir together the room temperature sour cream and flour, (room temperature sour cream won't bust in the sauce and you can leave out the flour if you're gluten-free); stir the mixture into the skillet and heat through, but do not boil.

Sprinkle cilantro on top. Serve with rice.

Yummmmm. . . . I made this last week when I was feeling under the weather and wow, those spices picked me right back up again. Sort of a comfy beef stroganoff kind of dish but with the amazing spices.

STM
edit on 12-10-2016 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: Marky83

Ok...... as a restaurant cook I have to say no great restaurant ever uses a microwave. I have worked at a # ton of great restaurants (worked and trailed) and it just does not happen.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:01 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

As a restaurant cook, I can assure you that microwaves are indeed used. Good try, though.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:02 PM
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a reply to: Marky83

He said no "great" restaurant.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:07 PM
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a reply to: Marky83

I have worked at the Daniel, and Annisa in NYC. Nope, no microwaves. Also no microwaves at ABC kitchen.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:20 PM
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originally posted by: SeaWorthy
If you are in small towns, tourist areas or average restaurants, they all use microwaves. It simply is not possible to cook everything to order. It could not be made fresh. If you cook large quantities if you you have a heavily served dish, you reheat in microwaves.

Today a lot of the actual cooking is done in microwaves even baked potatoes.


Sorry, whatever the excuse is, that is just lazy cooking to me.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:24 PM
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originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
I have worked at the Daniel...


Mr. Boulud, a culinary god amongst men. Nice place to have on the resume.

ABC is pretty killer too.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

The Daniel is insane to work at. I worked hot apps and grill at ABC. The volume is outrageous. For a three hour lunch service we were doing anywhere from 200 to 300 heads per service daily.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: TheAlleghenyGentleman

Yeah, I can imagine. I did some work with a certain red haired Italian chef before I had my own places.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Ahhh I have some friends working for that clog wearing maniac. Nice!



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 09:40 PM
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originally posted by: TheAlleghenyGentleman
Ahhh I have some friends working for that clog wearing maniac. Nice!


Good for them, the guy knows what he's doing. You don't end up with a restaurant mini-empire if you're a hack.

One of the best meals I had since I got out of the biz was taking 7 clients to Del Posto for the premium wine paring tasting dinner. Obscenely good.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 10:02 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

That's awesome because my friend works at Del Posto. She loves it.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 10:13 PM
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I can drop a TON of Mexican food on this thread. Are they restaurant worthy? I don't cook professionally, but work with restaurants on the accounting side. And I cook the best, most authentic mexican food that you will find. Ill start with enchilada sauce. I use estimates here, mostly because you work it until the texture is what you want (thick enough to stick. To the tortilla).

- 1-1.5 lbs of your favorite dried chiles. I recommend not using smaller ones like pequin or chile de arbol. They are hot. Ancho is the best, but you want to break up the sweet with a bit of spice. So something like 2/3 ancho, and 1/3 new mexico or cascavel is perfect. Cut them open and remove the seeds and the white stuff that the seeds attach to. This is the source of the heat....you don't want to much of it
- a dozen chipotles and the sauce they are marinated in. Remove the seeds and pulp...these are quite spicy so be thorough...scrape the inside of each one with a knife. You just want a slight smokyness in the sauce.
- half gallon beef stock
- 1 large sweet onion
- 2-3 heads garlic
- salt/pepper to taste

Put all ingredients in a stock pot, reserving half of the beef stock. bring to a simmer, nd simmer until the liquid reduced by half, with the lid half way off.

When the ingredients are all cooked soft, turn off the heat and puree in a blender. Add beef stock until the desired thickness is reached. If needed, use filtered water if you run out of stock

Cook and parse into servings. Freeze for up to a year. Although it never lasts more than a few weeks here. Its a great enchilada sauce, works well with asado (which ill include next), and is a perfect base for bbq sauce

Asado is simply cut up pork roast, or stew meat, braised and then simmered in chile sauce.

Cut up 3 lbs pork roast (dark meat, like a shoulder or butt roast) into 1/2" chunks, and brown crispy in bacon fat and corn oil. When crispy and the moisture is rendered from the pan, throw in half dozen minced garlic cloves and blossom. Deglaze the pan with half a beer, then barely cover the meat with 5-6 cups chile sauce and beef stock or water. Return to a boil and simmer for 45 minutes. Uncover, add in 2 tbl cumin and reduce liquid by half or until thick, bubbly, and the pork soft.




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