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The 10-Step “Does My Shirt Fit?” Test

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posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 07:25 PM
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With so many celebs and many shirts to choose from it can become a daunting task to make sure you don't appear as an imbecile...

With-out further-ado




1. Check the shoulder seams first.

They should rest at the edge of your shoulders. Not on top, and not over them.
If your shirt fails here, no need to check the rest. It’s doomed.

2. Check the buttons.
Are the buttons pulling at the fabric to try and reach each other?
Is the fabric of your shirt coming apart between the buttons?
Bad sign! Your shirt’s too tight.


3. Put two fingers between your neck and your collar.

If you can’t fit two, the collar is too tight. If you can fit more than two, your collar’s too large.
collar space
Index and middle finger, guys. Pinkies don’t count!

4. Hold up your left arm, and pinch the fabric together at your sides.
You should be able to pinch between 2-4 inches. Any more than that, and it’s too large. Any less and it’s too tight.

5. Feel how much room you have in the sleeves.
They should be tight, but you should be able to bend your arm without feeling the fabric stretch. Armholes should be as high as possible without restricting movement.

6. Check where your sleeves end when you let your arms hang by your sides.
Sleeves should end by your thumb dimple. If you don’t understand where your dimple is, glide your finger across the side of your wrist, and feel for an indent.

7. Raise your arms in front of you.
If you feel the fabric stretch in the back, it’s too tight.
Arms raised in front
If you were turned into a zombie, would the back of you shirt survive?

8. If you pan on wearing your shirt tucked (some or all of the time), tuck it in when trying it on. Raise your hands above your head and see if it stays tucked.
arms raised position
Ballerina pose optional. When in company, I suggest a double fist-pump to protect your masculinity.

9. And while it’s tucked, pretend to tie your shoelaces, and see if the shirt stays tucked.

10. If you plan on wearing the shirt untucked, raise your arms and make sure none of your belly is exposed.



restartyourstyle.com...










Your Best Friend Forever Ever,

Lys




posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: Lysergic

Great post and very useful.

When most dudes finally get a shirt that fits right it feels so weird they go running back to the bad fitting stuff.

Anyhow, thanks for helping to beautify America.




posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 07:47 PM
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If you were turned into a zombie, would the back of you shirt survive?


This is vital, not being a naked zombie is one of the highest concerns in my life.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 07:52 PM
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always more likely to buy/wear too large instead of too small. I dunno. I prefer my clothes to look like im a dwarf rapper.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 09:07 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan



im a dwarf rapper.


Wear are they sent afterwards?


edit on 11-10-2016 by Dan00 because:




posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 10:47 PM
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A truly refreshing thread, no pun intended. No political BS, no WW3, No UFOs, no ghosts! God bless you



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 11:39 PM
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Or patronize a tailor. A pity people in the Advanced Western World can’t afford them any more.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 11:43 PM
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a reply to: Astyanax

Oh laugh it up.

We can, too. Some of us just don't have to.




posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 11:55 PM
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Every ATS member, except for myself, Atyanax and Lysergic do not understand the deep importance of fashion and its impact on society.

The rest of you are staggering around in the dark. Lost.

Textiles are all. Everything.

And I learned that at ATS.

Weep for your lack of understanding.

Weep


edit on 12-10-2016 by Dan00 because:
Good Lord, I'm an idiot.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 12:02 AM
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a reply to: Dan00

I disagree. Textiles are important, but tailoring stands or falls with the cut.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

On suits. Shirts are a bit different, but this really is the man to listen to with men’s clothing.


Charlie Watts: The thing with men's tailoring is that you don't really design it. If I went to my tailors—I have two in London—and I said I wanted a notched lapel on a double breasted suit, they wouldn't make it. It's always a peaked lapel on a double-breasted suit. There are things no good men's tailor will do. And you think, why not? But then when you see someone try those things, they look wrong. It's a hundred years of making a suit a certain way, and I love the tradition of that. Charlie Watts in GQ



edit on 12/10/16 by Astyanax because: of GQ



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 12:07 AM
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I like the Bruce Banner cut for a gentleman.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 12:18 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax



Textiles are important, but tailoring stands or falls with the cut.


Yes, but some of us are the traditional "clothes horse", upon which the standard of the better manufacturer's standard sizes fit.

I'm "off the rack", most of the time.




posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 12:20 AM
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a reply to: Dan00

Oh, it applies to off-the-peg, too.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 12:26 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax



Oh, it applies to off-the-peg, too.


I suppose so. If you are an umbrella.

Re: The C. Watts quote: it's the textiles, than. Right?



You're spoiled somehow by a glut of tailors.


edit on 12-10-2016 by Dan00 because:




posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 12:31 AM
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a reply to: Dan00

I don’t want to get into a fight about it but no, Watts is talking about styles in that quote. Read the rest of the article at the link; if you like to dress well, it’s interesting.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 12:39 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
always more likely to buy/wear too large instead of too small. I dunno. I prefer my clothes to look like im a dwarf rapper.


and you can grow in to them lol.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 01:15 AM
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a reply to: Dan00

Men's fashion is about textiles, and fitness.

It has its own rigour that is nearly as strenuous as that of the women folk.

*shrug*

Charley is relying on folks that are relying on textiles.

He had better.





Textiles are important, but tailoring stands or falls with the cut.


Try as i might to figure it through; in the end that's the truth.

You're right, and it can't be refuted.


edit on 12-10-2016 by Dan00 because: I thought I was on to something.



posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 02:43 AM
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a reply to: Dan00

The Cutter is the most important person to any couturier, more important than the designer or stylist, in fact what a Cutter can and cannot do dictates design and style. Hence the limitations on suits and suiting fabric.

In terms of male fashion, my brother has a long lecture that he gives when an employer asks him to tuck in his shirt regarding sexual harassment and gender stereotyping, and the choice he makes not to enslave himself to fashion by objectify himself and his genitalia. He has a point, be it a bombastic, self-serving one, male high fashion has always been about emphasising the pubis area, just as much as female high fashion is about how much tit you can get away with showing.




posted on Oct, 12 2016 @ 08:10 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
Or patronize a tailor. A pity people in the Advanced Western World can’t afford them any more.


When visiting a tailor, i always try to be as patronizing as possible. And sarcastic. Even when they jab me with their pins.

Guy i work for saw a dude in NYC back in the mid 80's. He was making him a suit as a favor to someone with far more money/power. He told him, "Come by, ill make you a suit that will last the rest of your life". Ill be damned if he wasn't right....dude still wears that suit today, and its the best suit i have ever seen. Its got this timeless, classic look to it. Just change the tie a bit, and it would fit into any decade from the last 100 years.



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