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Fleet week, SF

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posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: HomeyKXTA

I was shocked at how badly movies and models hour it wrong. It didn't look anything like I expected. I can only imagine the screaming on both sides when people realized what they were looking at.




posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 05:09 PM
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originally posted by: HomeyKXTA
a reply to: Stngray

Thanks Stingray. We had a great vantage point. Plus that Boeing was REAL low. Definitely a demonstration for the photographers & Plane Spotters at the event

I'll post some pretty cool C-130 shots for your significant other

Thank you. She will get a kick out of it.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Was it documented at an AFTC DET? Or somewhere more "exotic" that doesn't get as much scrutiny?



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 05:29 PM
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Very sharp and nice pictures, I enjoyed watching them


a reply to: Zaphod58
a reply to: HomeyKXTA
There is a book that, if you´re willing to pay up to 330€ for it (new, prestine condition), will disclose a classified submarine screw from certain submarine class to you. Adding to that, I´m not sure if it still is classified, but it certainly was at the time of the book release. It´s not a secret that this picture is in there so I suppose they don´t care. It was in the last century, though. Going to look up if hunt for red october is aviable at my streaming service...
edit on 11-10-2016 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: HomeyKXTA

Oh it's still out on the Web in a few places the last time I looked for it.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 05:29 PM
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edit on 10/11/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 06:00 PM
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a reply to: HomeyKXTA













His rear door was closed for the first pass, then opened after a few circles.
More 130 porn to come

edit on 10112016 by HomeyKXTA because: (no reason given)

edit on 10112016 by HomeyKXTA because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 06:17 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: HomeyKXTA

Oh it's still out on the Web in a few places the last time I looked for it.


uh oh, now that's a tease and a half. Guess its time to spend some time on Terraserver.
By this time tomorrow, my girlfriend shall Rue the day smart phones got satellite imagery viewer apps.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 06:44 PM
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Not hard to find at all.



P



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Yeah, I forgot about this incident until I saw the photo, and it totally came back to me.
But I'm searching for something else on the maps, something that doesn't look like any model or movie depictions...



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 08:59 PM
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I said I´m going to watch hunt for red october to give a hint on the submarine class, actually went to watch the movie, saw the screw on the american submarine, at 10:18 in the movie you see the US sub from behind and it has the same curvature but misses one or two blades. Pretty accurate for a movie. I know, this is as off-topic as it can get (talking about submarines in the aviation forum)


This is not a boomer but SSN, nonetheless, it´s pretty accurate.
edit on 11-10-2016 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 09:11 PM
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a reply to: HomeyKXTA

It's similar to that picture, but it's a much better look and you can get a lot of detail of the screw. You can just about figure out how to build one with the detail it gives. They might have finally taken it down. It's been a few years.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 09:12 PM
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a reply to: verschickter

Technically the topic is fleet week, and subs are part of the fleet.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 09:17 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
The big players who are interested in this, probably have it either way. I suppose the desired effect is to bring the water towards the middle of the screw and concentrate it there instead of the way a fan works for example to make the stream more dense and avoid bubbling. I see what they did there, I think.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: verschickter

That's pretty much exactly what it's supposed to do. It's a similar effect to what the curved tip of a helicopter rotor does. One of the biggest noises of a sub is caused by cavitation from the screw. By curving it like that they keep cavitation to a minimum, if not almost completely eliminating it.

Russia improved their blades, thanks to Japan in the 80 or early 90s, but the US and her allies had much better screws than they were ever able to produce. Now that propulsors are gaining popularity the noise levels are dropping even more.
edit on 10/11/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 09:34 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
I wonder how far magnetohydrodynamic propulsion is, with techniques like supercavitation that has been around for nearly 60 years and better supraconductive materials.

About russia...You don´t need to find out how it works, if you can buy the tools to make them...



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: verschickter

All the limitations of it in HFRO hold up on real life. It's slow and complicated. You actually can get as quiet or almost quieter with a propulsor.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 10:04 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Did a quick google to get a picture and you know what smart google told me?
"A propulsor is a mechanical device that gives propulsion." You don´t say, google!
Turns out, Voith... if this tells you something... walked through their workshop several times in Crailsheim, at Voith Turbo. They make these things.

It´s really staggering how much high value technology is located around me, don´t get me started on levitation again, although that´s not really what it is. more like attaching something in a field and keep it relative to it´s original position, even when you rotate the field on any axis, the attachement will keep the relative position. mind. blown.
edit on 11-10-2016 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: verschickter

They've finally gotten efficient enough to be used for a large ship. They're incredibly quiet as well. The Virginia uses one, and the new Russian boats will have them.



posted on Oct, 11 2016 @ 10:16 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Now that I know what a propulsor is (damn language barrier), I´ve seen those already in a documentation about container ships, where they have 4 or 5 of them located at different places and rotateable. Although, silence was not the idea behind installing them, it´s for "parking".




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