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Police Officer Allows Herself to be Beaten - Rather Than Shooting The Criminal.

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posted on Oct, 6 2016 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: tigertatzen




Angel dust is actually what people used to call a street concoction of coke and heroin...similar to what meth users call "riding the rollercoaster". A stimulant and a sedative together will get a person very high, but not cause them to pass out and miss the whole experience.


i have no problem with the rest of your post, but this is not true. i'm a child of the 60's and 70's when it first became popular. coke and heroin mixed together is called a speed ball and PCP has always been called angel dust among other names.

wiki cause it's fast


Phencyclidine (PCP), also known as angel dust and Sernyl among others,[3]



PCP began to emerge as a recreational drug in major cities in the United States in 1967.[8]:46 In 1978, People magazine and Mike Wallace of 60 Minutes called PCP the country's "number one" drug problem. Although recreational use of the drug had always been relatively low, it began declining significantly in the 1980s. In surveys, the number of high school students admitting to trying PCP at least once fell from 13% in 1979 to less than 3% in 1990.[8]:46–49


Phencyclidine

reread your post and seen this.



I think this story is a fabrication...I want to be clear on that. And it's the fact that they chose PCP that cements it for me, actually. The reason for that is, PCP is infamous, due to its side effects. Hallucinations, irrational and violent "animalistic" behavior, psychosis...all of those are common with this drug. But the most important thing about it, particularly in regard to this story, is that people who are high on PCP do not feel pain, and they aquire an almost superhuman strength. They are neither asleep nor awake...they are under general anesthesia.


again from the wiki,



Effects Behavioral effects can vary by dosage. Low doses produce a numbness in the extremities and intoxication, characterized by staggering, unsteady gait, slurred speech, bloodshot eyes, and loss of balance. Moderate doses (5–10 mg intranasal, or 0.01–0.02 mg/kg intramuscular or intravenous) will produce analgesia and anesthesia. High doses may lead to convulsions.[12] Users frequently do not know how much of the drug they are taking due to the tendency of the drug to be produced illegally in uncontrolled conditions.[13] Psychological effects include severe changes in body image, loss of ego boundaries, paranoia, and depersonalization. Hallucinations, euphoria, and suicidal impulses are also reported, as well as occasional aggressive behavior.[8]:48–49[12] Like many other drugs, phencyclidine has been known to alter mood states in an unpredictable fashion, causing some individuals to become detached, and others to become animated. PCP may induce feelings of strength, power, and invulnerability as well as a numbing effect on the mind.[7]
Studies by the Drug Abuse Warning Network in the 1970s show that media reports of PCP-induced violence are greatly exaggerated and that incidents of violence are unusual and often limited to individuals with reputations for aggression regardless of drug use.[8]:48 Although uncommon, events of PCP-intoxicated individuals acting in an unpredictable fashion, possibly driven by their delusions or hallucinations, have been publicized.[citation needed] One example is the case of Big Lurch, a former rapper with a history of violent crime, who was convicted of murdering and cannibalizing his roommate while under the influence of PCP.[14] Other commonly cited types of incidents include inflicting property damage and self-mutilation of various types, such as pulling one's own teeth.[8]:48[14] These effects were not noted in its medicinal use in the 1950s and 1960s, however, and reports of physical violence on phencyclidine have often been shown to be unfounded.[15][16] Recreational doses of the drug also occasionally appear to induce a psychotic state that resembles a schizophrenic episode, sometimes lasting for months at a time.[17] Users generally report feeling detached from reality.[18]


, as well as occasional aggressive behavior.[8]

PCP-induced violence are greatly exaggerated and that incidents of violence are unusual and often limited to individuals with reputations for aggression regardless of drug use

so with all the other effects individuals with a predisposition for violence can do what was said.





edit on 7-10-2016 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-10-2016 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-10-2016 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:03 AM
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originally posted by: Mousygretchen
a reply to: carewemust


Why didn't she use her taser? That would be one question.



There were four officers involved...One DID use his taser, as well as pepper spray.

"The unconscious officer’s partner hit the man with a Taser and pepper spray, and he was arrested. Two other officers were injured arresting the man. All three officers were taken to Lutheran General. The man arrested was treated at Loretto Hospital."

Source: www.chicagotribune.com... tory.html



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:06 AM
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originally posted by: WilburnRoach
a reply to: WilburnRoach

The suspect was captured and is in jail, one cop was injured but no one died, isn't this a good thing.


This one PCP-pumped guy, sent THREE officers to the hospital in that incident. But you're right, none of the officers died. But unfortunately, neither did the violent offender.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:17 AM
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a reply to: luthier




Why no acoustic weapons? Even methed out pcp fiends cant ignore that without ear protection. 


No one gets "methed out" on PCP. Meth and PCP are not the same thing. Not even close. Meth is a stimulant drug, and users are awake...really awake. If they become psychotic, it's from prolonged sleep deprivation, starvation and dehydration.

PCP is a general anesthetic, like Diprovan, the drug that killed Michael Jackson...that is used to put people under during surgery. These people are not awake. They are in a walking dream state, essentially.

They do not register pain. Acoustic weapons will not deter them in the least...in fact, they would probably become even more violent. Mace does nothing. Tasers do nothing. Everything that happens around them becomes part of their waking dream. They are not consciously aware of anything, nor will they remember it later.



The problem is training and aptitude testing. Its not the cops fault they get thrown into the fire andnwere hired without being qualified.


According to the OP source, which directly quoted her superior, the female officer is not a rookie. She is a veteran officer with 17 years of service under her belt. That much experience is more than enough to make her "qualified".

If this were actually a true story, qualifications have nothing to do with it anyway. It wasn't a training issue. It was hesitation to use deadly force for personal reasons that have no bearing on her training. If anything, her decision was diametrically opposed to her training.

The narrative is that she chose to disregard her training and not shoot the guy, and take on the dubious role of sacrificial lamb instead. For the greater good of her department, of course. It might make a halfway decent B movie plot, if they got a better script writer.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

First of all, if the assailant was on PCP, I very much doubt the officer made a concious choice not to draw her gun and discharge it. It is probable that the suspect was on her and grinding her face against the pavement before she could say "Stop! In the name of the law!".

Second of all, once she had been grabbed up by the offender, her partner should have been all over the situation like a rash. Macing a guy who is high on PCP or any highly potent psychoactive or psychotropic drug, has a decent chance of doing nothing other than pissing the person off. The other officer should have been on this guys case like a hammer on a nail head.

The sound byte of a cop taking a kicking to avoid shooting an actual threat, does not excuse the plentiful bounty of instances where cops have straight up murdered bound suspects, homeless nutters who posed a threat to no one at all, and so on and so forth, so personally, I call bogus on that explanation of events.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:48 AM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie

It is absolutely true. I wrote a paper on it in college, for my Abnormal Psych class. Angel dust was originally the street name for coke and heroin in a cocktail. The PCP crowd adopted it and made it famous slang for that drug, too, as well as the most common slang moniker. But PCP has a number of different names, just like every other drug out there.

Street drugs have many different aliases, and it depends on where you are. A speedball, to use your example, can be any combination of coc aine and and an opiate. That particular drug slang originally applied to coke and morphine, before heroin became popular. It can also refer to coke and benzodiazepines, like Valium or clonazepam. Yet another speedball combo is meth and opiates or benzos.

Wiki may be quick, but it is not always accurate...anyone can write stuff for it. I thought I had my drug book in the closet and was going to snapshot info from there and post it, but no joy. I did find an excellent info page for you, though:
PCP

It is a fact that PCP does not work the same on everyone who uses it. That was one of the reasons it became so popular for street use. But remember, that drug was a surgical anesthetic, and there is no standard clinical dose for it...because general anesthesia affects everyone differently. As a street drug, there is no way to know for sure how much is too much, and the people who go batsh!t crazy are the ones who typically use a whopping dose because they don't know any better. They do not respond to stimuli normally. They become wild and animalistic. That is a fact. Will everyone react that way? No, the effects will vary depending on the individual, and it has absolutely nothing to do with the person's normal temperament.

I have witnessed a PCP overdose firsthand. Tiny little woman, like a crazed animal...maybe 100 lbs soaking wet. Back then, we still used hard leather restraints, which she broke. She had attacked her boyfriend and three other people, and when he finally wrestled her into the car, she jumped out of it on the freeway going more than sixty mph and then got up and proceeded to walk along the shoulder for almost a quarter of a mile before she collapsed. Know what stopped her? She had a perforated lung from a jagged piece of a broken rib, and couldn't breathe sufficiently to keep walking at a fast pace. She didn't pass out. She simply collapsed.

After she broke two sets of restraints, hit the charge nurse in the head with a bedpan, kicked several people and screamed herself hoarse, she tried to bite the ER doc in the face. That was the end of that...he paralyzed her with succinylcholine and intubated her so they could place a chest tube and treat her numerous injuries.

The next day, she had no recollection of any of it. Her boyfriend didn't know what was wrong with her...he thought she was possessed; and in a way, she actually was. She smoked weed that was laced...not even a very large dose, but it affected her profoundly. Someone else might have not been adversely affected at all, but it is different with everyone. That's one of the main reasons it is such a dangerous drug and banned from clinical use in this country in the first place.

Plenty of people have used PCP long-term and been perfectly fine. But that is not the perception of the general public regarding that drug, which is why I think they used it in this story rather than something more common. PCP is scary, and most people think it is no longer in use, so if they hear that, they're going to have a strong reaction to it...it sort of solidifies the image in people's minds of this crazed psycho beating a female cop senseless, and she endures it because she is afraid to use her gun for fear of public retaliation.

It's like finding out the person who coughed all over everybody at work for a week straight doesn't have a common cold, but has H1N1 instead. That'll get people's attention quick, fast, and in a hurry. Same concept here...they want people to pay attention to this story. They want to play up the psychotic behavior, and the brave female cop who took a vicious beating to save her department from a scandal...and PCP sounds a whole lot scarier than the more widely used substances out there.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:54 AM
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What do you want people to say? She made a dumb decision and paid the price for it. If you want things to work out well for you, be smart.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:55 AM
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originally posted by: 191stMIDET
a reply to: carewemust

Why didn't she pepper spray him? Seriously? She almost got killed by some nut job. #JUSTANOTHERDAYINTHEUSFUNNYFARM


Lol @ pepper spraying someone on PCP.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:59 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

You're right, it doesn't do much to assuage the negativity of recent events. So what would be the point of going to such lengths to fabricate an elaborate sob story? More distraction? Surely they could do better than this. I don't understand exactly what's going on here lately, but at this point I personally do not believe this story is authentic, and it would take quite a bit to convince me otherwise. The whole thing just smacks of manipulation, and I think we've had more than enough of that already.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 03:23 AM
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originally posted by: Zanti Misfit
a reply to: carewemust

Why didn't she try to subdue him by Verbally Shaming him ? It works on Dogs .


Doesn't work on apes though



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 03:28 AM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

Its probably the case that the assailant simply got the drop on the officer, beat the living daylights out of her, and rather than allow the issue to become a question of the effectiveness of the officers involved in the incident, it was dressed up as something heroic to save face. Not the officers face of course, which I would imagine is somewhere between hamburger meat and lasagne sauce at this point.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 03:37 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Well, that is also an extremely likely scenario that had not occurred to me. It would definitely explain the discrepancies and overall vibe of dishonesty that I'm picking up. I'd much rather that be the explanation than a more sinister alternative. Sinister is being grossly overdone these days.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 03:41 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

If she's not going to do the job she was trained for and uphold the law as she took an oath to do, she has no business being on the police force. What would happen if she had a partner in serious trouble (IF anybody would want to work with her after this) and needed her AND her gun...is she just going to stand there and watch her partner die rather than draw her gun? Or not draw her gun, take a bullet herself AND get her partner killed? Just on principle? Life and death principle no less? Seems like she's in serious need of rethinking her priorities, get a desk job or leave the force. Especially in Chicago.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 04:12 AM
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a reply to: luthier

That's another thing that doesn't make sense about the story. Police officers deal with crazy people on a routine basis. They know how to subdue a suspect, and with three other officers there and the maniac busy rearranging the female's facial anatomy, they should have been able to get him under control. He'd already been working pretty hard on her face, so the initial adrenaline charge would have already been pretty well diminished.

But according to the source, this guy attacked three male officers as well, and even went so far as to imply that they were afraid of him. Ok...well, they all had weapons...so why did none of them take him down? It would have been justified, so why let him continue to beat the woman to a pulp? It makes absolutely no sense.

This story is not true...whether that is a lame attempt at covering incompetence or some nefarious, sinister something or another, it is a complete fabrication. I don't understand how anyone could just take it at face value...it is too full of holes.

You're right about them not having adequate defense techniques, and I have to wonder if that may be the message here. Something like: if we shoot people, we'll be vilified for it and we aren't allowed to choke the guy out or we're limited as to what techniques we can employ, so the bad guy beats the hell out of a helpless female cop and there's nothing we can do about it without risking public persecution.

Well...I think it's entirely possible that they could have done something along those lines to make people feel guilty for criticizing law enforcement. I hope that's not the case, but unfortunately, we now live in an America where it is scarily plausible. It is becoming harder and harder to know what is truth and what is not, every passing minute.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 04:21 AM
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originally posted by: Rubicon3
a reply to: carewemust

If she's not going to do the job she was trained for and uphold the law as she took an oath to do, she has no business being on the police force. What would happen if she had a partner in serious trouble (IF anybody would want to work with her after this) and needed her AND her gun...is she just going to stand there and watch her partner die rather than draw her gun? Or not draw her gun, take a bullet herself AND get her partner killed? Just on principle? Life and death principle no less? Seems like she's in serious need of rethinking her priorities, get a desk job or leave the force. Especially in Chicago.


Well, if you're going to dish out blame to the female officer, you might as well serve up a plate for the others too, because none of them used their weapons. Even after this guy allegedly attacked three officers to such a degree that they all required medical attention, not one of them took him down, despite having good reason and plenty of opportunity to do so.

Allegedly, of course...only the people who were there know what actually went down. All we've got is a convoluted story that defies all logic and only serves to confuse things even more.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 04:28 AM
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a reply to: tigertatzen

Actually, where physically restraining a suspect on PCP is concerned, you may be off the mark a little. PCP is a drug whose affects include, but are by NO means limited to, increases, staggering increases in strength, endurance and a virtual cease of pain response.

So you end up with a person who has the apparent strength of ten men, such strength that their muscles have been known to tear free of the bones they are attached to, because the automatic limitations placed upon ones output by ones brain and chemistry, are no longer in force. People on PCP have been known to totally ignore pain or physical injury, as if these things had not happened at all, until such time as enough blood is lost to kill them. Essentially, someone on PCP, who has received a certain dose, under the correct conditions, becomes a juggernaut, an unstoppable behemoth, who cannot be knocked out, cannot be incapacitated, can only be either killed, or bought down with some sort of counteractive agent to the chemical in their bloodstream. It is VERY dangerous stuff.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 04:32 AM
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originally posted by: Subaeruginosa

originally posted by: tigertatzen

originally posted by: Zanti Misfit
a reply to: carewemust

Why didn't she try to subdue him by Verbally Shaming him ? It works on Dogs .


Did you come up with that witty remark all by yourself or did you need help driving the Inane Train?


That comment was hilarious and actually quite clever... I don't know, does calling someone a dog have the same meaning over there in Cali as it does here in Australia?

I've heard it used once or twice on Hollywood movies to describe the lowest form of person... but generally you guys tend to use the word 'rat' rather than 'dog'... so maybe you didn't get it?

lol


Oh...don't mind me. I'm just yanking his/her chain a bit. No harm meant.

But no...I've never heard anyone here refer to another person as a 'rat' unless they're referring to someone being a snitch. That's not very common these days though, either...at least not in this neck of the woods. Personally, I prefer 'troglodyte'. It just rolls so much more smoothly off the tongue.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 04:34 AM
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Geez, righto happies, You are all experts here. Chick cop gets smashed. Why did this happen or is it the fault of the other cops or...orr.....she is a victim of being submissive and now being mentioned for not deploying lethal force.

Get over it.

Problem is, here in this forum, that no matter what circumstances prevailed she or the other cops present should have shot the man. And perhaps rightly so.

You armchair critics, you should put a uniform on and hold a badge in this situ and then you, yes,,,you,,,show me what you would have done.

Then,,,,,don't whinge or whine when you end up before an internal affairs investigation, a coroners court, federal or local court and finally submitted ti the indignation of a public court for costs and the injuries or death of an offender not to mention the stupid,,,stupid... public behaviour after the shooting of an offender.

Are there going to be any, "waves hands," riots, burning or looting over this. Of course not. Keep sinking the beers back and blame the cop/s.

Kind regards,

bally



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 04:52 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

You must have missed my previous posts where I've been saying that very same thing, over and over, lol. I know from professional experience that they're a serious threat. People tend to think of PCP like meth or coc aine or crack...it is nowhere near any of those. It's not even in the same class of drugs. It's a general anesthetic, not a stimulant.

What I was saying about subduing him was contingent upon the premise that he'd been attacking four people all at once, and would have burned off the adrenaline burst and begun to experience muscle exhaustion. In that case, three trained male officers should have been able to subdue him. He'd still be crazy as hell, but he'd be physically weak.

What I personally would have done, which not one of the four officers did, including the three who were watching him beat the living daylights out of the woman, would have been to subdue him with a nice, hot bullet. If he was able to injure three trained police officers severely enough to require medical attention, he posed an imminent threat to anyone else in the vicinity, and it would have been justified.

Yet no one shot him. Even though the officer was quoted as allegedly stating that she thought she was going to die. There is no good reason why that man is still walking around right now.

Hypothetically, of course, assuming that he ever existed in the first place, or that any of this actually happened.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 04:58 AM
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a reply to: bally001

What are you talking about? What beers? That bizarre rant certainly came out of left field...



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