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Tennessee Mom Throws A Fit When Her Daughter Learns About Islam In School

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posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: enlightenedservant

So why are people still condemning each other over religions that state to do the opposite?

TheRedneck


In spite of what is stated, religions have always been used as tags. That's the unholiness of any religion.




posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

But doesn't that also fit under "not contributing to the problem"? For example, I think that ignorance and fear of the unknown are the cause of most forms of racism and bigotry. So instead of being a part of that problem, I prefer to see things for myself, learn the truth about things, and then teach what I've learned through activism and music.

That and practicing what I preach are my forms of "not contributing to the problem". And in doing so, I end up interacting with a bunch of different people from different backgrounds, which also helps alleviate the problem. Ok, I'd like to think that it helps alleviate the problem, but that's actually determined when something bad happens & people have to choose between kneejerk fury or their newfound "understanding".



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

She's not protesting out of hatred, it's out of, to her, justifiable fear, as you rightly point out.

This is where, should she be willing, someone needs to actually sit down and explain what is happening. In that way, perhaps, ignorance is given short shrift. She shouldn't be shouted down, her fears should be addressed.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 07:50 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: TheRedneck

She's not protesting out of hatred, it's out of, to her, justifiable fear, as you rightly point out.

This is where, should she be willing, someone needs to actually sit down and explain what is happening. In that way, perhaps, ignorance is given short shrift. She shouldn't be shouted down, her fears should be addressed.

In our desire to see wrongs righted, and circumstances to changed, we have to be realistic in our expectations.

Racism and religious intolerance is not something new to our society. It comes with a very long, and rich history.

I come from an area that still had segregated schools, and "White Only" signs plastered everywhere, as I was growing up. Black people could not enter the movie theaters, they had to go around the side and enter from the balcony. They could purchase clothes from the Ben Franklin but they could not try them on.

This all was going on less than "50" years ago. Look how far we have advanced in all that time. Some may even say that our progress is going backwards. So I don't think it is fair to blame this woman too harshly, because she is not embracing something that she has been taught to fear, when are still fighting the battle of racism, in a country rife with hatred and intolerance.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

That and practicing what I preach are my forms of "not contributing to the problem". And in doing so, I end up interacting with a bunch of different people from different backgrounds, which also helps alleviate the problem. Ok, I'd like to think that it helps alleviate the problem, but that's actually determined when something bad happens & people have to choose between kneejerk fury or their newfound "understanding".

Exposure and interaction goes a long way towards building bridges.

I have known people who are racist, that think they aren't, because they have one Mexican friend, or one Jewish friend.

I used to think that they were just hypocrites, but I now believe that you can't build a brick house if you don't have any bricks. One friend is a start, in the right direction, so there is always hope.

Like Redneck said, and as it seems you make an effort to do; we can only tackle bigotry, racism, and intolerance by trying not to contribute to the problem, and giving people an new vision, in hopes of generating a new truth.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant


But doesn't that also fit under "not contributing to the problem"? For example, I think that ignorance and fear of the unknown are the cause of most forms of racism and bigotry. So instead of being a part of that problem, I prefer to see things for myself, learn the truth about things, and then teach what I've learned through activism and music.

I see it as a more proactive step. "Not contributing to the problem" would be satisfied had we not ever exchanged posts. What you have done, and what I hope I have done, is to take that proactive step and talk civilly with one another, without undue suspicion of each others' motives.

I take that step in my daily life. I stand 6'-2" tall, long hair, long full beard, and wear a black Stetson everywhere I go. I don't just call myself a redneck; I am a redneck! But adopting that name, to me, places a burden on my shoulders to educate others as to what a 'redneck' is and is not. I am educated, tough, capable, tenacious, and even stubborn. I have a Southern accent you'd need a bushhog to nick, much less cut. I am not racist or bigoted. By showing those qualities in my everyday life, I am redefining the word 'redneck.'

You, sir, are redefining 'black' and 'Muslim' by every action you take. Whenever you put your best foot forward to demonstrate your humanity to others, that is a step in the right direction.


Ok, I'd like to think that it helps alleviate the problem, but that's actually determined when something bad happens & people have to choose between kneejerk fury or their newfound "understanding".

That's always a concern for me as well; it just happened with Bill Clinton using 'redneck' derogatorily. I ignored it. He will not define me. I, and I alone, define me.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: seagull

Absolutely that would be the best way to handle it. But, sad to say, one talk won't do it.

It takes many talks, casual "hello"s, simple acts of kindness and compassion, to erase that much ignorance. It takes someone, as you say, addressing those fears openly. That even means some concessions, on a temporary basis; maybe rescinding the policy against bringing books home or allowing her to sit in on a class (obviously without disrupting the class).

Learning is not a sudden thing. It is a long, drawn out, lifetime process that encompasses everything one experiences, not just classroom settings. We have to remember that.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 11:25 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

What you've described there is a willingness to look past fear. You can not, as you say, force someone to do that. You can only foster the environment in which it can happen.

Forcing that sort of change only drives the fear/hate underground where it festers, then erupts as it has all too often in our world. A world, which most of us know, is far too small to survive it much longer.



posted on Nov, 2 2016 @ 04:07 AM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: Miracula2

The Muslim Kingdom of Morocco was the first country to recognize the United States' independence. Thomas Jefferson had a Qur'an, learned Quranic Arabic from it (which helped him in diplomacy), and that same Qur'an was used for the swearing in of the Muslim member of the House of Representatives, Keith Ellison.

And President John Adams negotiated the 1796 Treaty of Tripoli, which says this in Article 11 (HERE):

ARTICLE 11. As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion,-as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen,-and as the said States never have entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mehomitan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.

Oh, the treaty was originally written and negotiated in Arabic, with "Musselmen" being Muslim and "Mehomitan" being Mohammedan. Does that count as info our schools should teach about Islam?


I'm mentioning all of this because it's absurd to think that America doesn't already know about Islam. We've been here from the beginning and even had working relationships with the "Founding Fathers" (as I listed above). Not only that, but many of our entertainers and sports figures are Muslims, from Muhammad Ali, Hakeem Olajuwon, & Bernard Hopkins to Dave Chappelle and Ice Cube.

And I mentioned this before, but this quote is simply wrong:


then allowing a religion that requires its adherents to kill those who do not accept it is lack of respect for public safety by Congress and the President

The actual Qur'an tells us the exact opposite, with one of its 114 Surahs dedicated to commanding us to tell disbelievers "unto you your beliefs and unto me mine". I'm actually getting tired of having to post this since anyone could look it up for themselves. Here's Qur'an Surah 109 Al-Kafirron ("the Disbelievers") in its entirety (Pickthall translation):

1. Say: O disbelievers!

2. I worship not that which ye worship;

3. Nor worship ye that which I worship.

4. And I shall not worship that which ye worship.

5. Nor will ye worship that which I worship.

6. Unto you your religion, and unto me my religion.

That's the entire Surah and any Muslim that disobeys this is defying what we believe are the literal words of God. In other words, they're doing it in spite of Islam, not because of it.


I think regardless of the divisions of faith there is a Higher Power in control of the Universe. For instance, I was gaming yesterday and someone in gaming clan who has the Panda in his clan name said in gaming chat "You messed with the wrong panda, only yesterday, and then I see on CNN about how someone invaded a panda enclosure at a zoo in China I think and wrestled with him.

Here's the CNN video.

www.cnn.com...



posted on Nov, 3 2016 @ 03:16 PM
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originally posted by: surnamename57

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: enlightenedservant

So why are people still condemning each other over religions that state to do the opposite?

TheRedneck


In spite of what is stated, religions have always been used as tags. That's the unholiness of any religion.


Not just tags. Not just bigotry. I've seen them personally, educated religious leaders even with Ph.D's in psychology engage in psychological deception and manipulation of honorably discharged members of the military who have even gotten baptized, pay tithing, avoid fornication, adultery, honor the Sabbath. Etc. While at the same time avoiding compliance with Biblical doctrine which teaches against preaching for money, as it says "the hireling careth not for the sheep".

It goes far beyond tags and us versus them. They take it so far that I would expect most Budhists I have met to have more respect for people who have taken the time to get baptized and honor the 10 Commandments than I would someone who professes a belief in any sect of American Christianity.

edit on 3-11-2016 by Miracula2 because: forgot a word



posted on Nov, 10 2016 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: eNumbra

Exactly. Well said but ignorant folk believe only their massive delusions so its a good try tho I doubt it is understood.



posted on Nov, 25 2016 @ 06:43 AM
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Huge parts of our past has been directly influenced by religion.



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