It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Tennessee Mom Throws A Fit When Her Daughter Learns About Islam In School

page: 30
50
<< 27  28  29    31 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 06:45 PM
link   
a reply to: dragonridr

Bible study was not required when we discussed it. And along those same lines I don't need to know the tenants of any religion to discuss what they religion did or what people did in the mname of that religion.

If the truth be told, I think the reason why they are going into those areas of Islam, is to make Islam acceptable to the non-Muslim children.

If they talk about only what was done in the name of Islam, without explaining why it was done, it will paint Islam in a bad light, which is exactly what they are trying to avoid.

I don't think they have thought it through. They can present the basics, "a tomato is red when ripe, but some types might be green or another color, depending or where it came from, and it has a different taste"..., and so forth. But I believe that religion of any kind should be kept out of public schools.

You can look at ATS for example. There are a large number of atheist on ATS, their hatred of Christianity is so great that no matter how much information is presented, it will not be accepted. This is the problem in a country, where people have been exposed, and know the religion intimately.

I don't see the benefit of trying to teach the understanding of a religion in schools, when the religion and the culture are so foreign to the majority of the population, and where there is such great differences in cultures.

Children will learn these things as they are exposed and when they obtain a interest. Force feeding them, I don't believe will help.




posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 08:20 AM
link   
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

I think the thing you have to remember with the US, is that it does NOT uniformly teach its students in a manner which comprises an honest, realistic, and comprehensive education. The first settlers of the country are, for the first several years of a child's education, lauded as heroes, despite the fact that many of them were more savage than the native population. The Spanish conquistadors only appear as the villains they were in educational terms, once a child has reached a certain age, and in some states the line between science and faith is deliberately blurred by the partiality of local and state legislators on the matter of education.

Not only that, but the US is a bad example because up until as recently as 2012, there were kids learning from text books published before I was even born, and I am thirty one years of age. Now, that may not be common, but the fact it happens at all in a nation as diverse and technologically advanced as the US, suggests that the system which provides for education there is NOT actually equal to the task in all cases, and it MUST be.

Just to put that comment about thirty year old text books into perspective, we are talking about 1985 here. Ideas and conventions about race may have changed a great deal since then, but if we are going to justify today's children being bought up on out of date information, spun with the political bias of thirty plus years ago, then what progress can you expect in the USA?

None. Kids are generally born in hospitals, and raised at home. But schools, environments in which learning and development are encouraged, where stagnation and a lack of challenge are frowned upon, are where adults are made. Or at least, they are when the kids in them are being fed the up to the minute data, when they are supported in their intellectual development and their interpersonal development, when they are challenged by the environment to think more clearly, to imagine other people as being as complex as they, themselves are.

But that is not happening, and that is evidenced by the very hatred and intolerance that we see today. And to be fair, it is not helped by the propaganda mill which is running constantly in the background, needling away at otherwise reasonable people, and making them believe lies by simply repeating them often enough that they begin to sound like truth. These meme-viruses, infect people from every walk of life in the US, even teachers and parents, legislators and law enforcers, and through these things, the children do NOT learn equality. They learn instead about injustice, intolerance, greed, weakness, and they see these things as strengths because even those they look up to are guilty of them, and PROUD of their faults!

If the truth, unfettered, without bias was actually taught uniformly, in EVERY class room, in EVERY school, without the slightest partisanship, without partiality, then there would be no where near the level of tension in your society right now, because we would all be able to see that the puppet shows are not working, that none of you buy the pantomime you are being shown in place of a genuine election, and that none of you, not a single one, is thinking of turning on his or her fellows over the lies of someone with an interest in controlling the population!



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 09:07 AM
link   
a reply to: TrueBrit
I can't argue with your sentiment, but schools were always about grooming the American population for control.

The most deadly thing we have on this planet is the media. We know it. We know that they speak no truth except when it is to their benefit, yet we are so well programmed and conditioned that we can't free ourselves from its prison.

People pay more for their remotely controlled electronic shackles, than for almost anything else in their lives, including the educating of their children. Some even place the shackles in their children's hand before they can even walk.

I see a huge battle coming. People who are aware and want to break their children from these chains have started home schooling their children. This was allowed in the past because the numbers were few and they where not a threat.

With the increase in the use of the computer and the internet in education, the need for public schools or classrooms are more a benefit to the working parents than they are to the students. My nephew was homed schooled. I didn't like the idea in the beginning but his mother proved us all wrong. He graduated from High School with college degrees under his belt and a scholarship at a prestigious college. He did okay but many of his peers did much better. They graduated with multiple degrees and were hired into the top of their desired field.

This will not be allowed to continue. The schools are not going to keep allowing their best students to be lost to home schooling and they be left will only those with special needs, or as a corporate babysitter.

The education system in the US needs a major over haul. It should be the primary responsibility of the parents to ensure their children obtain a good education, but parents are torn between, work, their desires, and their egos. Their children are barely making to the top of the list of their priorities.

You are right the education system in America is abysmal. We can do a lot better.

I am not embedding this but it kind of explains how we got where we are.
www.youtube.com...
edit on 15-10-2016 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: Word edit.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 04:03 PM
link   
a reply to: TrueBrit

The best post I've read this month.



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 05:49 AM
link   
I just voted by mail for Trump. Enough of this nonsense, Fort Hood shootings and such. I like Trump's idea of stopping immigration of Muslims from terrorist supporting nations.

Clean up the gene pool. Until Congress forms a special committee to investigate Islam as to whether or not it is true, then allowing a religion that requires its adherents to kill those who do not accept it is lack of respect for public safety by Congress and the President. If it is true then it should be taught in public school and colleges and all citizens required to convert as this would alleviate the need for Jihadis to attack the US.

Failing to clarify Islam by a Congressional committee creates unsafe division.



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 10:55 AM
link   
a reply to: Miracula2

The Muslim Kingdom of Morocco was the first country to recognize the United States' independence. Thomas Jefferson had a Qur'an, learned Quranic Arabic from it (which helped him in diplomacy), and that same Qur'an was used for the swearing in of the Muslim member of the House of Representatives, Keith Ellison.

And President John Adams negotiated the 1796 Treaty of Tripoli, which says this in Article 11 (HERE):

ARTICLE 11. As the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion,-as it has in itself no character of enmity against the laws, religion or tranquility of Musselmen,-and as the said States never have entered into any war or act of hostility against any Mehomitan nation, it is declared by the parties that no pretext arising from religious opinions shall ever produce an interruption of the harmony existing between the two countries.

Oh, the treaty was originally written and negotiated in Arabic, with "Musselmen" being Muslim and "Mehomitan" being Mohammedan. Does that count as info our schools should teach about Islam?


I'm mentioning all of this because it's absurd to think that America doesn't already know about Islam. We've been here from the beginning and even had working relationships with the "Founding Fathers" (as I listed above). Not only that, but many of our entertainers and sports figures are Muslims, from Muhammad Ali, Hakeem Olajuwon, & Bernard Hopkins to Dave Chappelle and Ice Cube.

And I mentioned this before, but this quote is simply wrong:


then allowing a religion that requires its adherents to kill those who do not accept it is lack of respect for public safety by Congress and the President

The actual Qur'an tells us the exact opposite, with one of its 114 Surahs dedicated to commanding us to tell disbelievers "unto you your beliefs and unto me mine". I'm actually getting tired of having to post this since anyone could look it up for themselves. Here's Qur'an Surah 109 Al-Kafirron ("the Disbelievers") in its entirety (Pickthall translation):

1. Say: O disbelievers!

2. I worship not that which ye worship;

3. Nor worship ye that which I worship.

4. And I shall not worship that which ye worship.

5. Nor will ye worship that which I worship.

6. Unto you your religion, and unto me my religion.

That's the entire Surah and any Muslim that disobeys this is defying what we believe are the literal words of God. In other words, they're doing it in spite of Islam, not because of it.



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 06:46 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Wow, I get to post something I actually know about! Thanks for the segway.

The Jewish, Christian, and Islamic religions are all Abrahamic religions, meaning all trace the lineage of the religion back to a single character: Father Abraham. Abraham had two sons: Ishmael and Isaac, born of different women. God had promised to give him a son, but due to unbelief, Sarah, Abraham's wife, took it upon herself to convince Abraham to have a son with his maidservant: Ishmael. Later, when Sarah herself conceived Isaac, she became jealous of Ishmael and eventually convinced Abraham to turn him and his mother out. God afterward promised Ishmael his descendants would be many.

Ishmael begat the Arabic people, who eventually accepted Mohammed as their Prophet, founding Islam. Isaac begat the Jewish people. Christianity was another offshoot of the Jewish faith. Christians follow Jesus, who we believe is the promised Messiah; the Jews do not believe He is the Messiah.

All three have a common ancestry.

Jesus Himself preached against offense to others many times, and admonished those who broke cultural traditions for offending. By His own teachings, a different culture with different rules of conduct would need its own Prophet.

Yet here we are today, arguing over something inportant we share, because of the unimportant things we find different. Abraham never condemned anyone; Jesus refused to condemn anyone; your quote shows the Quran condemns no one.

So why are people still condemning each other over religions that state to do the opposite?

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 07:05 PM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck



So why are people still condemning each other over religions that state to do the opposite?

People will always find a reason to judge, condemn, fight, steal from, and kill each other. Religions are just an excuse, just as nationalism, ethnicity, and ideologies are also used as excuses to do these things. So I think it's better to ask why people condemn each other in general.



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 07:35 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Your point is well taken.

Sadly.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 08:37 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant




Oh, the treaty was originally written and negotiated in Arabic, with "Musselmen" being Muslim and "Mehomitan" being Mohammedan. Does that count as info our schools should teach about Islam?


In fact it damned well should!!

That it doesn't speaks volumes, and none of it good. Only reason I knew that, is I learned it on my own. Tryin' to give up that ignorance that so many seem to be embracing, rather than denying.



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 10:30 PM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck

The most we can do as individuals is just make sure we're not contributing to the problem. That's why I keep trying to remind people that we're only humans. Every demographic on Earth has people who are generous or greedy, peaceful or violent, strict or lenient. But people screw up by judging entire groups by the actions of their worst members.

a reply to: seagull

Ironically, I learned it from personal studies too. Like I mentioned earlier in this thread, my k-12 didn't teach about religions at all. It was so ridiculous that I had an English teacher once tell our class that we should take English more seriously because it's "The Original Language of the Bible". Several of us looked at each other in disbelief, then made sure the teacher corrected himself by saying he meant the King James Version.

edit on 16-10-2016 by enlightenedservant because: left out a word



posted on Oct, 16 2016 @ 10:47 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Ironically, I learned it from personal studies too. Like I mentioned earlier in this thread, my k-12 didn't teach about religions at all. It was so ridiculous that I had an English teacher once tell our class that we should take English more seriously because it's "The Original Language of the Bible". Several of us looked at each in disbelief, then made sure the teacher corrected himself by saying he meant the King James Version.

All teachers are not equal. They too are human, and come to the table with their own set of baggage.

That is another reason why I would not want something as personal and sensitive as religion taught in public school.

In my family, I think we have just about all well known religions covered, with a sprinkling of those not so well know. We manage to communicate, celebrate, tolerate, and love, with only rare episodes of dissension.

Though I personally do not have a use for religion, I respect those that claim to be religious, and their rituals. Outside of the basics, I don't believe religion has a place in public schools. In many cases, religious scholars can't agree on what is truth and what is right. Public school teachers should not be saddled with that albatross.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 08:48 AM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

I disagree; there is one more thing we can do. We can each, in his own time, step outside our culture and our comfort zone to learn something new. The problem we face today is in large part due to people refusing to do this in their own life, while trying to demand others do so.

Humans are made to learn. We all crave knowledge. Many are simply too fearful to pursue it and that fear will cause them to push back violently if forced to confront it. But as one chooses, of their own volition, to make that fearful first step toward knowledge, others will follow of their own free will. That's how you destroy the fearful attitude that started this thread: with single small steps.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 12:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: enlightenedservant

I disagree; there is one more thing we can do. We can each, in his own time, step outside our culture and our comfort zone to learn something new. The problem we face today is in large part due to people refusing to do this in their own life, while trying to demand others do so.

Humans are made to learn. We all crave knowledge. Many are simply too fearful to pursue it and that fear will cause them to push back violently if forced to confront it. But as one chooses, of their own volition, to make that fearful first step toward knowledge, others will follow of their own free will. That's how you destroy the fearful attitude that started this thread: with single small steps.

TheRedneck

When I was in college I took an interest in speech therapy. One of the requirements of the class was for me to work with children with disabilities. That was one of the most fulfilling summers that I spent in college. My interest in helping the disabled, lead me to other types of disabilities, and I feel in love with American Sign Language.

Gallaudet, one of the most prestigious schools of higher learning for the Deaf, was not far from where I was attending school, so I signed up for ASL classes at Gallaudet. I thought it would be of great benefit to my patients, if I could communicate with them in a way that would be comfortable and easy for them.

I did not go in as the great mighty warrior, come to rescue the poor disabled deaf people, but it didn't matter. That is how it was perceived. I was an outsider. I was a hearing person in a deaf world, and I was not welcome. I didn't stop loving ASL, but I did give up the classes. In fact, I started taking classes again about 6 months ago, and just this semester, I have a deaf instructor, which is awesome. But the point I am trying to make, in my typical around Robin Hood's barn kind of way, is that sometimes reaching outside of your comfort zone, and reaching out to other cultures, may not be as easy as you think.

Reaching out is half the battle. You have to be received and accepted for it to work. Failed attempts to bridge a gap, can sometimes make that gap larger, for one or both parties.

I am not discouraging people from reaching out to bridge the gaps. I just shared my story because there where no mistakes made on either side. It was just the time and the place was wrong.

To add to the end of the story. My sister, who is also hearing, presently takes ASL classes at Gallaudet. There are still some that are not happy about hearing people being on campus. But there are large numbers that are happy that there are hearing people that want to embrace their culture, and want to learn their language. Times have changed. For many attitudes have changed.

We can't become angry, bitter, and combative, if our attempts at communication and bridge building doesn't work every time. History carries with it a lot of harsh feelings that have to be overcome, and we just have to let go.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 01:38 PM
link   
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn


Reaching out is half the battle. You have to be received and accepted for it to work. Failed attempts to bridge a gap, can sometimes make that gap larger, for one or both parties.

Truer words were rarely spoken.

The one legacy of political correctness is that all speech can be considered hateful and inappropriate if not phrased just right. Most people (myself definitely included) do not have the ability to speak perfectly every time. So many simply stop speaking where the possibility of offending politically correct feelings is great.

That includes any time that race, gender, sexual preference, or religious affiliation is different.

The mother who lodged the complaint that started this whole discussion is probably not evil, nor is she anything less than scared. To her, this is an assault on her way of life. To the school, this is an attempt to educate. This gap in understanding each other is fueled by ignorance and fear. The mother's fear comes likely from an unfamiliarity with Islam, which itself comes from a lack of exposure to Islam. Why wasn't she exposed to it? Because far too many people will take any word, any phrase uttered toward a Muslim as an insult.

I will be honest: I had to twist my own arm to talk to enlightened servant. There was a fear present; I was concerned that I would inadvertently say something in a quest for knowledge that could be interpreted as an insult. Thankfully, that did not happen, and again I praise enlightened servant for his understanding and helpfulness.

But far too many others are far from helpful. By carrying their chip around on their shoulder, just waiting for the wrong word or phrase to be dropped, they are denying people the opportunity to freely learn about each other. They are promoting the very bigoted actions they claim to despise. They are keeping racism, sexism, and all the evil isms alive and well by refusing to let them heal under the soothing poultice of knowledge.

They are the true racists and bigots. Not the average guy who just doesn't know which words to use.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 01:57 PM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck

But far too many others are far from helpful. By carrying their chip around on their shoulder, just waiting for the wrong word or phrase to be dropped, they are denying people the opportunity to freely learn about each other. They are promoting the very bigoted actions they claim to despise. They are keeping racism, sexism, and all the evil isms alive and well by refusing to let them heal under the soothing poultice of knowledge. They are the true racists and bigots. Not the average guy who just doesn't know which words to use.

This is something we will never get perfect. I used to walk on egg shells trying to make sure I said just the right word, with just right tone and inflection, and it put me on edge. Guess what. It automatically put the person I am talking to on edge also.

The job I have now has made me better at communication, because no matter what I say, it is going to be wrong. My peers often ask me why I am able to get victims to open up so easily with my unsophisticated, frequently nonclinical approach. I first thought it was because I was just lucky. It was my Advocate that explained, that the victims talk to me, when they are reluctant to to talk to others because they know that I am being honest, and they know that I really care about them.

I gave up up on learning the right words to say, I now focus on understanding what the victim is feeling, and I try to communicate from the soul, and not from the lips.

Being PC does little for true communication. It is just posturing, role playing, and script reading. Most people see through it fairly quickly.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 02:03 PM
link   
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Words are indeed little more than vessels for communicating thoughts. The thoughts are what's important, not the vessel they come packaged in.


TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 02:54 PM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck
You know little steps do help.

I live in the woods, and I don't have a whole lot of neighbors. When I first moved in, seems like a lifetime ago, most of the neighbors kind of stuck to themselves. Everyone was tucked away in their individual hideaways, and it was peaceful.

The night before Christmas that first year, I went and placed stocking stuffers in all my neighbors mailboxes. Nothing fancy or expensive. Just a little something to say. Hi neighbor and to put a smile on their face.

That was 17 years ago. It has now become a tradition that we stop at each others' home during the holiday, and take time to recognize the blessing of having good neighbors. We have a drink or two. Talk about nothing, and just enjoy each others' company.

All of this started and grew from a simple gesture. So you are indeed right. Sometimes it is the smallest and simplest thing that starts us on the path of building those bridges.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 03:35 PM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck
Redneck, thank you shifting my mindset today. I was feeling a bit stressed for the last week, and my mind was moved to dark places. I come to ATS in an attempt to find truth, to learn, and for stimulating conversation.

Maybe because of the upcoming elections, things around here can sometimes be dark, and sometimes downright mean.

Your posts have made me think in a more positive direction. I sometime forget how amazing we Earthlings really are. and how important we are to each other. Even nuisance creatures like insects, are necessary for life to continue on this tiny world of ours. I would love for us to but the petty things aside so we can explore together all the magic and gifts this amazing world we live in has to offer. We have so much to learn.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 03:41 PM
link   
a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn



And thank you for making my day. If I can but spread a single ray of sunshine, or make one person smile or laugh, that day has not been a waste.

TheRedneck



new topics

top topics



 
50
<< 27  28  29    31 >>

log in

join