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Tennessee Mom Throws A Fit When Her Daughter Learns About Islam In School

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posted on Oct, 13 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: surnamename57

I was raised Catholic, but my parents let me go my own way around the time I turned into a teenager. Though I didn't fully reject faith into my late 20's.

Faith all together or just the Catholic faith?

I was raised in a multicultural family. My family has all the bases covered. Us children were not forced to choose one, and most of us have fluttered around almost all of them. I personally gave up on religion a while back, but I have never lost my faith in God. Now, my faith in man, and humanity is teetering, I hope it gets pulled back from the edge.




posted on Oct, 13 2016 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: NightSkyeB4Dawn

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: surnamename57

I was raised Catholic, but my parents let me go my own way around the time I turned into a teenager. Though I didn't fully reject faith into my late 20's.

Faith all together or just the Catholic faith?

I was raised in a multicultural family. My family has all the bases covered. Us children were not forced to choose one, and most of us have fluttered around almost all of them. I personally gave up on religion a while back, but I have never lost my faith in God. Now, my faith in man, and humanity is teetering, I hope it gets pulled back from the edge.

Well it was a slow burn process to go from first a practicing Catholic to a non-practicing Catholic to a Christian non-denominational to finally a full blown agnostic atheist. Around the time the Catholic priest pedophilia scandal broke I lost faith in that religion and then I just kept peeling back layers of the religion that I found upsetting until I was finally left with just the Bible. Then I started peeling back layers on that and found it to be untruthful as well.



posted on Oct, 13 2016 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t
I can appreciate what you are saying. Religion and religious texts go hand in hand.

Unfortunately, every thing we know, we know because we have been told. Even knowledge that we have from our own experiences, someone else has identified it for us. Whether it is a color, what the color means, or experiences, if it is good or bad, a taste, if it is sweet or bitter.

We are products of the environments in which we live, and we accept things as facts as we have been taught. When the things we have been taught no longer fit, or make sense to us, we reject them and we look for other answers. Again we will be taught.

It boils down to what we wish to accept as truth. If enough people believe a thing, it becomes an acceptable standard. The Internet has allowed people of like minds and beliefs to join to together. In many cases this is a good thing, in a many other cases, not so good. Depending or where you are standing.



posted on Oct, 13 2016 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Funny how the internet was pitched as a means to break down locks on intellectual knowledge but it has since morphed into a way for people to self-delude themselves in personal echo chambers.



posted on Oct, 13 2016 @ 04:04 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

personal echo chambers.

A perfect description. I am going to steal it.

The Internet; A place were anyone can find another, to reverberate their ideas, their beliefs, long enough, and loud enough for their delusions to take flight.

The Internet has morphed us all. There is no wrong or right on the Internet. We can sit at a table, and you can watch me draw a 6, then fight me to your dying breath declaring that I drew a 9.

As once said, “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.”
― Stephen R. Cove



posted on Oct, 13 2016 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

There is a huge difference between promotion of and education of. Are teachers promoting Greco-Roman or Egyptian polytheism when they learn about those culture's beliefs?
edit on 13-10-2016 by Comp0sMentis because: typo



posted on Oct, 13 2016 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

If it were only the right wing media the problem wouldn't be so bad. It's every damned portion of the media. ...an not just the media. It's people like us who can't be bothered to be involved with the decisions.

Please stop pretending that it's only the right wing. You're smarter than that.

Things like this are always open to public comment. School board meeting are, the vast majority of time, open to the public.

So to are city council meetings, county commissioner meetings, or the equivalent in most other countries.

I attended a city council meeting a few months back, the agenda to be discussed was street maintenance, a local swimming pool (and how to pay for it...), and several other items of some import. Would you like to know how many showed? Six, counting me. Six.

Go ahead and keep telling me it's the bloody right wing media. Go ahead. ...and I'll tell you you're wrong. It's us. People who are so stupidly apathetic to things around them that they can't be bothered to even opine about how their tax money is going to be spent.

The last school board meeting that was open to the public I attended had eight people show up. Out of a school district with somewhere in the neighborhood of 9000 students. Eight. I doubt the right wing media had anything to do with that abysmal showing. No. It was people who couldn't be bothered to step away from the dining room table, or from in front of the TV.

The media does play a roll in all this, however, it's hardly all the fault of the "right wing media" as you state. Not even remotely.



posted on Oct, 13 2016 @ 11:36 PM
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a reply to: dragonridr

I was taught a little bit about Islam in school, so too was Luther and the Protestant Reformation. You can not discuss anything involving history without discussing religion. You just can't.

Religion, for better or for worse, has been important in the history of the world. It can not be ignored, or done away with. HIstory would then become a mockery.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 03:27 AM
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Very good point hadnt really thought of that your right.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 03:37 AM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: dragonridr

I was taught a little bit about Islam in school, so too was Luther and the Protestant Reformation. You can not discuss anything involving history without discussing religion. You just can't.

Religion, for better or for worse, has been important in the history of the world. It can not be ignored, or done away with. HIstory would then become a mockery.


Did you read mein kamph I'm betting you haven't yet they teach about hitler in schools. You don't have to learn a person's beliefs to learn what they did and that is history. I don't have to know what say the apostle Paul believed to discuss Nero beheading him. History isn't about beliefs it's about actions that occurred. I don't need to know what thr night temples believed to understand there pilgrimages to thr holy land. Bible study was not required when we discussed it. And along those same lines I don't need to know the tenants of any religion to discuss what they religion did or what people did in the mname of that religion.

As I said that is further study which one should choose to do not be a mandatory part if a coriculum. And before you ask yes I read mein kamph and even read the Quran and even thr bible. But I chose to do this for further context being a history major. And let me say this all 3 were very disturbing😃



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: dragonridr

I agree with your assessment of all three books. Though comparing Mein Kampf with the bible is a bit of a stretch...but I get your meaning.

You can, indeed, teach about religions w/o the need to preach the religion. I've always felt that way, from rather a young age, not ten or anything like that, but my early teens.

So we probably agree far more than disagree on this, I think.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 05:54 AM
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Islam has no place in public school curriculum, period. If you want to learn about Islam, then go to a mosque where it's taught.
edit on 14-10-2016 by Kromlech because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 06:06 AM
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a reply to: Kromlech

Why? Why does it have no place?

Islam is part of history. Both light and dark. Oh, it most assuredly has a place.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 06:13 AM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: Kromlech

Why? Why does it have no place?

Islam is part of history. Both light and dark. Oh, it most assuredly has a place.


Public school isn't for religious studies. If you want to learn about Jesus Christ and the Bible, then go to a church. If you want to learn about Muhammad and the Quran, then go to a mosque. Simple. Not complex.
edit on 14-10-2016 by Kromlech because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 06:25 AM
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a reply to: Kromlech

So no mention at all, eh?

Religion, of whatever sect/creed, has been, and is, a basic underpinning of societies throughout history. You can not learn about societies new and old, without a basic grounding in their beliefs.

I'm not talking about doing religious ceremony. I don't much care for that idea either. I'm talking a basic grounding in understanding. As an example...

How do the Old testament Hebrews differ from the early Christians. Or certain sects with Judaism differ from one another, and how might this explain certain animosities that exist even today, thousands of years later. Same with Islam.

This has nothing to do with preaching the word. Or worship. One can learn about a religion, without the religion.
edit on 10/14/2016 by seagull because: (no reason given)


+2 more 
posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 07:02 AM
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a reply to: Kromlech

Public schools have an obligation to teach pupils about the world around them, and as many facets of what goes on in the world as possible, so as to correctly and comprehensively prepare a child to step into the shoes of adulthood.

For that reason, a rounded education in science, mathematics, English language and literature, other languages including but not limited to French, Spanish and German, geography, civics, AND religious affairs are all necessary. The reason they are necessary is as follows. Understanding culture and religion is vital to promote a society which contains adults who are competent in the crucial ability to understand their neighbours. Whether it be a Muslim child being taught the ways of Christian folk, a Jewish child being taught how Muslims do faith, or a Christian child being taught any of those two, or an atheist learning anything about faith at all, it is vital for every individual in society to have an understanding of the beliefs and motivations of others, even if those beliefs are not necessarily shared.

This understanding is critical, because humans have a tendency toward hating that which they do not understand, which is part of a series of conditions that we refer to as phobic, different modifiers being added to the front end of the phrase depending on what sort of difference they perceive between themselves and the object of their dislike. Removing the lack of understanding from the equation, reduces the amount of hate which is the product of that equation, and is vital for any modern, civilised, or for that matter, decent society.

This would be obvious to anyone who had read even the last hundred years of history correctly, and would be far more obvious to anyone who had a significant grounding in history more broadly, since near to all the major instances of xenophobia (as an example) stem from people being allowed to believe, through ignorance, that one set of people was superior to another, for a whole host of totally nonsensical reasons, none of which are accurate or in any way legitimate.

The thing that would have prevented much of this, is education, particularly access to the truth, which, of course, is that human beings are human before they are anything else, and that in fact, there is only one actual race on this planet, the human race. If this had been the norm in education from the get go, xenophobia would never have taken hold. In the same way, educating children about the beliefs of different faiths, prevents religious phobias in the children taking the class, because nearly all phobic tendency is drawn from the fact that it is easier to fear what one does not understand.

Therefore, understanding being spread about as thickly as possible, is better for society, and for the human race as a whole. In fact, the future of this species relies upon it just as firmly as it rests on a steady supply of breathable air.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 07:13 AM
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a reply to: seagull

I understand what you are saying. What I'm talking about is a specific part of the propaganda. If you are shunning the education, how are you going to develop the skills to even detect what is and isn't propaganda? This is what I'm trying to allude to here. Granted. I admit that all media is biased to some degree.

Trust me. I experienced it when I went to Iraq. My parents would tell me how the news was all about how soldiers were getting blown up left and right and I was like, "really? I never see anything over here." So I'm not trying to spin an either or narrative here. I just have a HUGE problem with rejecting education.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

...and so you should have a problem with rejecting education of any sort. In that, we're in lockstep. No knowledge is useless. That's the reason I have many hundreds of books on my shelves. To stop learning is to start dying.

Man, that was darn near philosophical...or as close as I ever come.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 06:20 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

The thing that would have prevented much of this, is education, particularly access to the truth, which, of course, is that human beings are human before they are anything else, and that in fact, there is only one actual race on this planet, the human race.

I hear what you are saying, and I normally agree with what you have to say, but education, time, and truth, has not done much to instill the truth of the message that , "there is only one actual race on this planet, the human race".

In America 2016 you have people talking about a race war. Racism and bigotry is alive and well in America. Americans can't even get along with Americans, I don't see much chance of someone of a different culture having much better luck.

Thank God the extraterrestrials are smart enough to keep their distance.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

It is not the schools responsibility to teach those things. Help? Surely. The parents are the main source of that, or should be.

If the parents fail, there's no chance the schools will succeed, none. It comes down to involvement by parent/guardian.




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