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Tennessee Mom Throws A Fit When Her Daughter Learns About Islam In School

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posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:06 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

As I said, American history is Christian history.




posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:08 PM
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LOL ...



'The government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion.'

President John Adams, Treaty of Tripoli, 1797 (approved unanimously by the Congress, one might add.)


History is an amazing thing.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:09 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: Krazysh0t

As I said, American history is Christian history.

And as I said, you are wrong.
edit on 7-10-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: Krazysh0t

As I said, American history is Christian history.

So you're admitting that Christianity was behind the Native American genocide, the widespread generational enslavement of Africans, the denial of rights to women citizens, the widespread eugenics programs, our perpetual wars, our forced racial segregation policies, the oppression of LGBT Americans, etc? Thanks for the admission.

Because every time people attack Islam for the actions of Muslim govts or Muslim extremists, people always point out similar actions done by Christians and Christian majority countries. But the response is always something to the effect of "Those things had nothing to do with Christianity". But at least you're admitting that you don't believe American history can be distinguished from Christian history, which can't only include the "good" things, right?

(For the record, I don't blame Christianity as a whole or even most Christians for those things. There were/are definitely specific American Christian beliefs that promoted war against different Native groups, enslavement of dark skinned people, anti-homosexuality policies, and that women should be subservient to men. However, similar beliefs can be found in different cultures all over the world, regardless of their religious beliefs or lack of religious beliefs.

In other words, I believe that those atrocities and injustices that I mentioned above are actually the result of humankind's corrupted nature, and people just use various religious and pseudo-scientific beliefs to justify their actions. But since you're the one claiming American history is Christian history, you'll have to accept the bad with the good.)



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

*applause*



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Do the research, my friend. The first documented hindu in America didn't arrive until the 1880s, aside from a handful of traveling merchants, the only muslims in America were slaves, not citizens, until after the Civil War, and most of the traditional American "pagan" religions were offshoots of Christianity.

In 1776 the vast majority of Americans identified as members of Christian faiths, practicing or otherwise along with a couple thousand European Jews who had emigrated here.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Yeah, Christianity is brutal and has a brutal history. So what? I understand why the non Christian world is scared of Christianity just as I understand why the non muslim world fears Islam. Religious harmony has historically only existed in the world when it is financially beneficial to both sides.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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Best phrase ever.... "Christian Justice Warrior" I'll add "Conservative Justice Warrior", "Republican Justice Warrior", "Patriot Justice Warrior" "Democrat Justice Warrior", "Liberal Justice Warrior", "Right Wing Justice Warrior", "Thin Blue Line Justice Warrior", "Merica Justice Warrior" and "Eco Justice Warrior".

I'm really happy now.

Back on track-Learning about something is never a bad thing. It's okay to learn about Christianity, and Judaism and Scientology and Islam and Satanism and Atheism. How is learning about the basic tenants and beliefs of a religion ever wrong?



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant


In other words, I believe that those atrocities and injustices that I mentioned above are actually the result of humankind's corrupted nature, and people just use various religious and pseudo-scientific beliefs to justify their actions.

I hope you don't mind if I repost this. It bears repeating.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: enlightenedservant


In other words, I believe that those atrocities and injustices that I mentioned above are actually the result of humankind's corrupted nature, and people just use various religious and pseudo-scientific beliefs to justify their actions.

I hope you don't mind if I repost this. It bears repeating.

TheRedneck

No problem. Even if all religions disappeared overnight, people would just find other reasons to justify our fights, flaws, and disagreements. People have to be willing to work together and reject our negative traits in order to get past that crap.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

Hmm, didn't expect you to actually agree. This is awkward lol. Though technically, American history also includes contributions from various non-Christian religions and ideologies. And many Christian groups and abolitionists were against some of those atrocities and oppressive policies. Other than that, I don't think I have any other objections.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

So Muslim slaves weren't helping to build American society? So you still think of them as property and not people then? Hell you also mentioned European Jews. Clearly you are now disproving your own point.

Christians may have had a large influence on American history but to say that American history is Christian history does a LARGE disservice to the Muslims, Jews, African slaves, Natives, and other demographics that I'm sure I'm missing who also contributed to make the US what it is today.
edit on 7-10-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

I think teachers are like any other profession. Some are better than others. Teaching the roots of all of the major religions or the civilizations associated with them is a good thing. People fear what they don't understand. Education goes a long way.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

Nope. Pagan, actually. But it doesn't matter bc religious freedom is in the BoR.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
Best phrase ever.... "Christian Justice Warrior" I'll add "Conservative Justice Warrior", "Republican Justice Warrior", "Patriot Justice Warrior" "Democrat Justice Warrior", "Liberal Justice Warrior", "Right Wing Justice Warrior", "Thin Blue Line Justice Warrior", "Merica Justice Warrior" and "Eco Justice Warrior".

I'm really happy now.

Back on track-Learning about something is never a bad thing. It's okay to learn about Christianity, and Judaism and Scientology and Islam and Satanism and Atheism. How is learning about the basic tenants and beliefs of a religion ever wrong?





posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I would like some clarification here:

You mention Muslim slaves, but I was under the impression the majority of black slaves were from western Africa. I was also under the impression that Islam originated and was for a long time primarily confined to Mideast/Persian area. Am I mistaken?

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

You are confusing yourself. First, the term Pagan was used by early Christians to differentiate Christians from non-christians. Paganism was not an offshoot of the Christian faith ever. Christians did title Hellenistic individuals with the term pagan. But, that doesn't mean that Christians created the philosophy of Paganism. I understand the confusion but you are missing it.
edit on 7-10-2016 by ColdChillin because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Essentially my belief as well.

One of the greater perks from my academic career is that I get to not just meet, but interact with and get to know people from many different nations and cultures. It broadens my horizons and allows me to see things in a broader scope. I have also found that university campuses (at least the one I attend) seem to have much less animosity toward others and much more acceptance of different cultures than general society. So much so that I have begun to wonder if there is not an actual correlation between racism and intelligence.

No, I'm not saying there is... I'm saying I wonder about it.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Some reading:
The Muslim Roots of American Slaves (part 1 of 2): From Africa to America

To understand the history of Muslim slaves in North America it is necessary to know something about slavery as it previously existed in Africa and the history of Islam in Africa, particularly in West Africa. Islam first reached West Africa by way of traders from North Africa and the Middle East. They settled in the area from as early as the tenth century BCE and thus began a slow and peaceful process brought about by trade. The journey from North Africa across the Sahara was done in stages. Goods passed through a chain of Muslim traders and were purchased finally by non-Muslims at the southern end of the route. Until the first half of the 13th century the kingdom of Ghana was a key trading partner with the Muslim North. Over the next five hundred years, assorted West African rulers and local merchants who wanted to do business with the Muslim traders adapted themselves to Islam and its customs.[4] Islam itself had a reputation of absorbing local customs thus the transition was smooth. However the majority of West African people did not convert to Islam until well into the 18th century[5], which just happened to be at the height of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.


Islam in the United States

While an estimated 10 to 30 percent[6][7] of the slaves brought to colonial America from Africa arrived as Muslims,[8][9] Islam was stringently suppressed on plantations.[6] Prior to the late 19th century, most documented non-enslaved Muslims in North America were merchants, travelers, and sailors.[8]



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Thank you; I will definitely peruse those links.

TheRedneck




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