It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Help ATS via PayPal:
learn more

Tennessee Mom Throws A Fit When Her Daughter Learns About Islam In School

page: 17
50
<< 14  15  16    18  19  20 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 07:57 AM
link   
a reply to: Krazysh0t

no different then the atheists protesting the removal of any studies involving christianity.




posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 08:00 AM
link   

originally posted by: gasface
a reply to: Krazysh0t

no different then the atheists protesting the removal of any studies involving christianity.

*eyeroll* Another person who has no clue what is going on in the OP and is bitter about Christian worship being removed from schools so he falsely equates it to the OP.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 08:20 AM
link   
a reply to: veracity

I am sorry you felt pressured, I never noticed the pressure myself..

But then again I was ostracized for being very undersized, having an overbite a bad stutter and glasses... so after dealing with that I really didnt care anymore what others thought of me.

I lettered in multiple sports in high school and never felt pressured, usually when the prayer was being said I was doing my final preps before game.

I am not saying it doesnt happen, just that I never felt it.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 09:55 AM
link   
The thing is...if you teach about all religions in school, it soon
becomes clear to young students just how many other people
in this world believe differently than they do about God.

And this leads to questions like "Why is mine right and
theirs wrong?"

Which leads to doubt.

And THAT is a threat to all religions.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 09:58 AM
link   
a reply to: Irishhaf

You did not feel pressured and still do not bc you are (just as I at the time but no longer) ignorant in understanding that it was forced upon you.


edit on 7-10-2016 by veracity because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 10:00 AM
link   

originally posted by: rival
The thing is...if you teach about all religions in school, it soon
becomes clear to young students just how many other people
in this world believe differently than they do about God.

And this leads to questions like "Why is mine right and
theirs wrong?"

Which leads to doubt.

And THAT is a threat to all religions.





Lol, you are being facetious, right?



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 10:04 AM
link   
a reply to: rival

I'm going to guess you are not.

There is a big difference in knowing about many religions and picking the best one from within that suits yourself which is healthy and intelligent.

And

Thinking your religion is the best and the only bc that is what your were told and refuse to learn about others bc "why? yours is the one and only God"...which is bigotry.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 10:22 AM
link   
a reply to: veracity

No I don't feel it is forced till I am told you will pray or you don't play.. or your grades will suffer..and if that happens lawsuits are 100% justified unless it is a private religious institution. I still wouldn't be happy about it but, the folks that send their kids there should have an idea of what they are getting into before paying the tuition.

Somebody praying near me doesn't bother me in the least...

has nothing to do with ignorance, it is just a difference of opinion.
edit on 7-10-2016 by Irishhaf because: hate auto correct



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 10:24 AM
link   
a reply to: veracity

No, I wasn't being facetious or sarcastic at all.

For me, education about world religion didn't lead to
a "best choice"...

It led to freewill, or agnosticism, or whatever you call
someone who believes in spirituality without believing in
the trappings of any religions or God.


edit on 7-10-2016 by rival because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 10:50 AM
link   

originally posted by: rival
The thing is...if you teach about all religions in school, it soon
becomes clear to young students just how many other people
in this world believe differently than they do about God.

And this leads to questions like "Why is mine right and
theirs wrong?"

Which leads to doubt.

And THAT is a threat to all religions.



Not being open to all things, is a threat to an intelligent mind.

If a God belief is for you, it should be by choice - - - not by assimilation or force.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 11:59 AM
link   
a reply to: Irishhaf
I am only talking about public schools. Of course religion of choice, i.e. Muslim or Christian school, will be prevalent in tuition paid schools.

Public schools should have no mandatory or suggestive religious practices, however learning about the roots and culture of them should not be confused with practicing that religion.


edit on 7-10-2016 by veracity because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:02 PM
link   
a reply to: rival
Oh, confused sorry



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Annee

My point is...education leads to enlightenment, which is a
threat to religion...all religion.

That is why this woman is so angry.

If her chosen religion could easily stand up against applied
logic and reason, there would be no argument from her
against educating children about other religions.

I don't understand how I was misunderstood, or how my
original post in any way implies that I am either
for or against religious education in school.

For the record, I am FOR educating children about ALL
religions, and opposed to teaching about only one.

Religion should be taught in school. I believe graduating
students should have a basic knowledge of all the major
religions in the world, including the basic tenets of each,
the respective number of followers, geographic centers,
etc.

The only reason NOT to educate about religion is because
of the threat posed to YOUR OWN belief system.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:09 PM
link   
a reply to: rival
Your original post was confusing, read it wrong. I agree with you



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: rival
a reply to: Annee

My point is...education leads to enlightenment, which is a
threat to religion...all religion.

That is why this woman is so angry.

I don't understand how I was misunderstood, or how my
original post in any way implies that I am either
for or against religious education in school.


OK, thanks.

I make straight forward statement style posts. Not meant to be judgmental or accusatory.

Religion is definitely about Fear and Control.

I've been watching the Christians kicking and screaming ever since the first Madalyn Murray O'Hair court battle.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:27 PM
link   

originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: Grimpachi

You'd be surprised how seriously some people out here take this. One of my friends asked me for a copy of the Qur'an, but said his wife would kill him if she saw it. I thought he was joking until he explained how anti-Islam her family was & how they'd already had heated conversations about it. I gave him a copy, which he said he could only read in his car, though I think he ended up settling on a pdf. Ironically, he came from a poorer background while her family was pretty well off.


Attitudes like that worry me... Luckily I know and work with enough Muslims that no matter how much propaganda I read in the news, I could never fully believe it. Not only that, but I was in Iraq while in the Army. I saw the people devastated by war. I also knew that all the terrorists were foreigners. None of them were Iraqis.

I've been exposed to so much Muslim culture (and to be honest, with the amount of Muslims in the world it is a fraction of fraction of a percentage of the culture) that there is no WAY the fear media's narrative is true. Sure, there are VERY bad Muslims out there who take their religion WAAAAY too seriously, but at the same time the same is true for Christianity, but the media makes it sound like ALL or most Muslims are bad which is nowhere close to true. And it disgusts me greatly that Americans are falling for it. Again.

Being around people from diverse backgrounds is the best way to get past all forms of stereotyping and bigotry. Or to be blunt, being around people gives us a chance to see whether the stories we heard about them were true or false. That's why I think that w/another 50-80 years of multiculturalism, things like racism and bigotry can finally disappear for good. It's hard to hate an entire demographic when you have friends, spouses, neighbors and friendly coworkers from those very demographics.

The sad part for me is that fear seems to override all of this in many people. Right after 9/11, some of my own friends and people I was in college with started doubting me. It was ridiculous because many of those same friends had spent the week at my house, had eaten w/my family, had done shows and gone to clubs w/me, etc. Then some people from another continent committed a crime and suddenly it's my fault too? It's made me weary to trust anyone 100%, because there's no telling what event can trigger kneejerk bigotry in someone.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 12:59 PM
link   
There's really not enough information in the linked article to make a judgement call here.

A large part of education is education about the human condition... that includes history and differences in cultures. History cannot be properly taught without reference to religion, since religious beliefs are a primary motivator for actions. There have been many wars and atrocities instigated and committed over religions... over almost all religions. For that reason, some mention of Islamic beliefs should be taught in public schools, just as some mention of HIndu, Jewish, and Christian beliefs should be taught as well.

On the other hand, no religious beliefs should be taught in such a way as to encourage or discourage belief. Religious teachings are not the venue of public schools. That as well includes all religions.

My first question is, was this a class that focused on history or culture of the areas affected by Islamic religious beliefs?

My second question is, was the material presented objectively without bias?

My third question is, was the presented material appropriate for the age range of the students? (and judging form what little I found in the article, it probably was.)

I would imagine the severity of the objection is tied to personal fears of Islamic culture, which are attributable to fear of the Islamic religion and peoples. That fear is directly attributable to the propaganda being fed to the American population over present situations in that area. Sharia law is quite different than the law we have; it is religiously based, even indistinguishable from a pure theocracy in many ways. Suggestions that we could be forced to live under such restrictions on personal freedom are scary to many people. Constant admonitions that Islam is a "religion of peace" while simultaneous violent exploits are carried out under the name of Islam have not helped either. I believe Islam is a peaceful religion, but there are quite a few practicing Islam who would apparently disagree with me. That mixed message creates confusion and suspicion in the minds of many.

I blame the MSM and our own government for promoting the fear that the mother is expressing. The subject of Islam has been so badly handled in the daily propaganda of the news cycles that few can keep track of who is good, who is bad, and so forth. A great example is the Syrian refugee crisis: We hear news stories from Europe that indicate terrorists entered countries through refugee immigration, then are told by our government that refugees are to be allowed to immigrate here. That is akin to saying we are allowing terrorists into our country freely, and that promotes fear.

Readers should understand that I am discussing public perceptions here, which may or may not be the same as the realities.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: hutch622

Why is that? There are plenty of American Muslims happily learning about the history of Christianity in American public schools.


American history is Christian history.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:03 PM
link   
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Agreed. Multiculturalism is racism's weakness. This is why you'll get many nationalists saying that multiculturalism doesn't work. They know that their position is untenable so they make up stuff about the other side to try to make themselves look good by comparison.

But anyone who has been near even a small part of multiculturalism knows that this is bs. We all SAY that all humans are equal, but until you see it up close and personal in a multicultural environment its hard to truly get it.



posted on Oct, 7 2016 @ 01:05 PM
link   

originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: hutch622

Why is that? There are plenty of American Muslims happily learning about the history of Christianity in American public schools.


American history is Christian history.

No it isn't. Christians helped build America, but so did many other faiths. I've already shown in this thread that Muslims helped build this country.

American history isn't exclusive to only Christians and trying to pretend it is is the same type of crappy revisionist history that is taught in our public schools that makes it so jarring when you actually attend a college level history class.




top topics



 
50
<< 14  15  16    18  19  20 >>

log in

join