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Quantum entanglement with satellites ? Delayed video

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posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 11:43 PM
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So on the quantum entanglement if you can transfer data somewhat like morse code or even 1's and 0's can you do interface it with a satellite x AU away?
The communication between earth to the satellite would be Instantaneous

Here's a light example

Someone robs a bank and gets away. No video feed on the car or person whom did it. They contact the satellite and the satellite positions itself to that bank, bam starts recording so it's essentially seeing the past , depending on how far out the satellite is.
Sees a car pull up a black charger with 3 personnel get out, has the car and possibly anything else it saw maybe even where they came from.

Very cool thoughtful technology could be used on a wide array of things such as terrorists attacks, assanation, natural disasters, to find out what happened leading up to this.

If you can see the past , you can solve the problems that occurred or find the cause.


edit on 2-10-2016 by Zeimten because: Added in




posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: Zeimten

Yes, quantum entanglement (QE) could allow for instantaneous information relay from any distance. This is why NASA is pushing hard to develop QE comms gear for use on their interplanetary and deep-space probes.

Having instant, un-interfered, non-line-of-sight communication would be a dream come true for them. Currently, they have to wait to send/receive data from Mars probes for example, and have to go to a lot of trouble (orbital comms relays at Mars, constellation of radio sites on Earth) just to make sure they keep that delayed link up.

With QE comms, NASA could put a probe a mile underground on Mars, during a solar storm, while Earth is on the other side of the sun... and still have instantaneous, crystal clear comms to the probe.

Oh, and there would be no chance of anyone ever intercepting those QE comms either. Which would also make NASA happy.



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 11:52 PM
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Since when could Satellites can see in the past?



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 11:59 PM
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originally posted by: ssenerawa
Since when could Satellites can see in the past?


If they are far enough away, they can. Because light travels at a discrete speed through space.

For example, the Earth is quite a way away from the Sun. And because of that, when you look at the sun in the sky, you are really only seeing what the sun looked like ~8mins ago.

When you look at the stars, you are seeing a cross-section of time. Some of the light form those stars are billions of years old, some millions, some a few decades.

But honestly, a satellite in Earth orbit isn't going to be able to "see the past" on the ground very well. Earth orbit is just too close and light travels too fast. At best, the satellite is only going to be able to see a second or two "into the past". If you can get a satellite about 1 AU away (same distance away as the Sun), then you could see about 8 minutes into the past. But it would have to have one HELL of a telescope and CCD on it in order to see the ground on Earth from that far away.

edit on 3-10-2016 by SoulOfCeres because: spelling/typos



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 12:02 AM
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originally posted by: Zeimten
If you can see the past , you can solve the problems that occurred or find the cause.
If you put a telescope on the moon, you could see 1.3 seconds into the past on Earth because that's how long it takes light to get to the moon, approximately. However you'd have a heck of a time identifying the bank robbers or the car with currently available telescopes. It would probably need to be huge to do that, and 1.3 seconds isn't far enough in the past to help much.

Quantum entanglement doesn't work the way you think it does.


originally posted by: SoulOfCeres
a reply to: Zeimten

Yes, quantum entanglement (QE) could allow for instantaneous information relay from any distance. This is why NASA is pushing hard to develop QE comms gear for use on their interplanetary and deep-space probes.
Nonsense, because the "information" that's transmitted is also nonsense like a random sequence of 1s and 0s, so how does that help? It doesn't help with faster communication but entanglement technology is useful for cryptography, the light speed or less variety.


originally posted by: ssenerawa
Since when could Satellites can see in the past?
Just a small fraction of a second for low Earth orbiting satellites.

edit on 2016103 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 12:08 AM
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Yes obviously it would need to be placed a hell of s lot further than earths orbit to achieve 10min or more feedback time.

Well one day.... Well have it if it already isn't created.



We have satellites that can read the pulse off your skin moving that are in orbit , pretty sure it's feasible



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 12:12 AM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur
Nonsense, because the "information" that's transmitted is also nonsense like a random sequence of 1s and 0s, so how does that help? It doesn't help with faster communication but entanglement technology is useful for cryptography, the light speed or less variety.


NASA is certainly researching QE:

NASA | Quantum Communications at Glenn Research Center

NASA | NanoRacks-GOMX-2 Small Photon Entangling Quantum System

And this one because it has a fun cartoon in it. lol
NASA | Researchers Advance Quantum Teleportation


However, it looks like I stand corrected on the idea of QE instant comms (according to our current understanding of QE):
Quora | QE Instant Comms?
edit on 3-10-2016 by SoulOfCeres because: added link to support Arbitrageur's post



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 12:17 AM
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a reply to: Zeimten

Like this

www.google.com...



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 12:21 AM
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Quantum entanglement DOESN'T send any information faster than light. This is one of those things everyone seems to think and they keep saying in popsci that's just plain wrong. The changes caused by entanglement contains no usable information on its own, if you want to send information with it like they do in quantum teleportation experiments you need a classical communication channel along with the entangled pair, 2 classical bits must be sent for each quantum bit (qubit). Since the classical channel is limited to light speed, the whole process is limited to light speed.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 12:37 AM
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I'm fully prepared to have my mind blown.

If I put a bomb in point A and instantly communicated detonation to you even though it takes five minutes for the sound to reach you, would that mean you had knowledge prior to detonation?

The point I'm trying to make is time, you never had prior knowledge. You had real-time knowledge, even if sound was the fastest alternative in transferring that information. Everything is a reaction from the blast and that includes the instant message, saying you will hear a loud bang in five minutes is just confirmation of what already happened.

People a lot cleverer than me have pondered over this, I don't believe a way back exists. We only have forward... I guess real-time would be the best we could do and that shouldn't be confused with prediction.

Again, quantum-entanglement based communications would be confirmation machines rather than oracles. As Einstein said every action has a reaction (he did in my timeline) the instant message is a reaction, you can't gain time by being faster. What happened basically happened.
edit on 3-10-2016 by RAY1990 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 12:55 AM
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originally posted by: Quaria
Quantum entanglement DOESN'T send any information faster than light. This is one of those things everyone seems to think and they keep saying in popsci that's just plain wrong. The changes caused by entanglement contains no usable information on its own, if you want to send information with it like they do in quantum teleportation experiments you need a classical communication channel along with the entangled pair, 2 classical bits must be sent for each quantum bit (qubit). Since the classical channel is limited to light speed, the whole process is limited to light speed.


Why do you assume communication would take place in a channel? Why would you, in a perfect world, just have sensors at both ends of two entangled particles? The instantaneous change of one could be measured and reacted upon accordingly.

Assuming it was possible to entangle them that far apart, it would provide much quicker comms than a light channel.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 02:34 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990

You can't use entanglement for FTL communication.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 03:35 AM
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originally posted by: Zeimten
So on the quantum entanglement if you can transfer data somewhat like morse code or even 1's and 0's can you do interface it with a satellite x AU away?
The communication between earth to the satellite would be Instantaneous

Here's a light example

Someone robs a bank and gets away. No video feed on the car or person whom did it. They contact the satellite and the satellite positions itself to that bank, bam starts recording so it's essentially seeing the past , depending on how far out the satellite is.
Sees a car pull up a black charger with 3 personnel get out, has the car and possibly anything else it saw maybe even where they came from.

Very cool thoughtful technology could be used on a wide array of things such as terrorists attacks, assanation, natural disasters, to find out what happened leading up to this.

If you can see the past , you can solve the problems that occurred or find the cause.



Did you just watch Deja Vu? 4 days and 6 hours in the past, that's it.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 03:51 AM
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Even with classical transfer, the speed of light is 300 million m/s, and the distance from Earth to a Satellite is only 600,000ish meters. It only takes 1/500th of a second for most Satellites to communicate with Earth anyway.

Exploration would be useful though, of deep space, where it only progressively gets farther from us.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 06:03 AM
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So if we sent this/A satellite 1 light year, we then would see further into the past/future?

Then when the information coming back to us then we could then see everything it allows us to then the further it goes the more we see or communicate with?

Just trying to get my head around it.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 07:53 AM
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originally posted by: SoulOfCeres

originally posted by: Arbitrageur
Nonsense, because the "information" that's transmitted is also nonsense like a random sequence of 1s and 0s, so how does that help? It doesn't help with faster communication but entanglement technology is useful for cryptography, the light speed or less variety.


NASA is certainly researching QE:

NASA | Quantum Communications at Glenn Research Center

NASA | NanoRacks-GOMX-2 Small Photon Entangling Quantum System

And this one because it has a fun cartoon in it. lol
NASA | Researchers Advance Quantum Teleportation


However, it looks like I stand corrected on the idea of QE instant comms (according to our current understanding of QE):
Quora | QE Instant Comms?
Thanks for doing the research, and you found out all those sources talk about encryption as the application for quantum entanglement, right? It's not faster than light but it's useful and is the focus of considerable research.


originally posted by: mfgrizzly
a reply to: Zeimten

Like this

www.google.com...



Believing in faster than light communication via entangled particles was held by most scientists to be roughly as close to lunacy as believing in Bigfoot; it was to invite the scrutiny and derision of your peers. I wasn’t comfortable with that.
Yet he doesn't seem to look all that hard for alternate explanations. It may have convinced him but it's not that convincing to me. By the way would you happen to have a link to the ATS thread on that?


originally posted by: DarkvsLight29
So if we sent this/A satellite 1 light year, we then would see further into the past/future?

Then when the information coming back to us then we could then see everything it allows us to then the further it goes the more we see or communicate with?

Just trying to get my head around it.
It will take our fastest spacecraft about 15,000 years to get to that position. So let's say on January 1 15,000 years from now, you send a signal to this hypothetical probe. It will take a year for your request to reach the probe, and a year to send you something back in response to your request. If you request it to send a recording of Earth it made on January 1 15,000 years from now, on January 1 15,002 years from now you'll see a recording of what the Earth looked like on January 1, 14,999 years from now.

If you just beam the recording back to Earth without any request you'd get it back 2 years later.

However you can't see much at a distance of one light year away. Even at a distance of light hours away, the entire Earth only takes up a fraction of a pixel in the famous "pale blue dot" image, so it's not a very practical idea.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 08:16 AM
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Cool thanks Arbitraguer, I get what you're saying.

I need to do more research and start with the link's already in this thread

edit on 3-10-2016 by DarkvsLight29 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: SoulOfCeres


A couple of years ago there was a brief member of ATS that had a user name that last word of which was "...engineer." He claimed to be computer engineer working in/on on the existing Mars mission. He became upset with the situation when he discovered the deep secret that we really were using quantum communication devices to talk to the equipment there. He came to ATS to expose that and had left his job. An aspect of this story, as I recall, is that he had also had domestic problems and was separated from his family. He supposedly had a buddy that was also clued into the q-com system.


This anti-hero went on in the next few days to setup a website that I believe used his name (as mentioned above). It disappeared shortly as did his presence on ATS where he was not taken too seriously by many responders. All I can say is that he presented himself and his area of expertise very well and he definitely was not some idle storyteller.


This is off-topic, but it comes to mind that if NASA has such devices, it would definitely be on the ISS where it can be used to censor unwanted live feed scenes. This would explain NASA ability to quickly turn off their camera(s) when something untoward appears. While, the time lag between sending images from the ISS and to TV screen would be very short, but it would be advantageous for hiding the appearance of UFOs. For all we know, the few seconds of mysterious objects we get to seenear the ISS before the feed is cut is a small fraction of what are really cut.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 09:08 AM
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a reply to: Aliensun

That fanciful tale is far from credible. What exactly led you to conclude he was "not some idle storyteller"?



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 09:22 AM
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originally posted by: GetHyped
a reply to: Aliensun

That fanciful tale is far from credible. What exactly led you to conclude he was "not some idle storyteller"?



What makes you conclude that he was...?

Being an UFO abductee, I don't trust a lot of things that we are supposed to trust. I used to, but I learned far differently.



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