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DIA-CIA Command Center Located Inside Of Shasta Dam

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posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 07:22 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

I heard about this thing called "IARPA" (similar to DARPA), because they are interested in my friend's Cannabinoid research.

Funny how every once in awhile these agencies peak their heads out from the shadows, otherwise we wouldn't even know they exist (like you mentioned).

Thanks for your reply Bedlam.




posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 07:39 AM
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a reply to: FamCore

No problem. Was kicking it around with the old lady a few weeks ago and she had never heard of a few of the fringier ones. What's funny is that you get "reform" and they kill off a few of the more unusual groups, but they don't stop existing, they just end up at another major TLA.

I'm roughing out a novel about one right now. They've had several names, and have been headquartered a half dozen places, and they get abolished and just pop up intact elsewhere. No one outside the community hears about them. But they're right there in the middle of most of the more oddball crap that goes on.

And that's one of a couple of dozen of small agencies. This one I know enough about to make them uncomfortable though, it's time for their Boo Radley moment.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 09:07 AM
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Gotta' love ATS!!!

WOW!



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 10:39 AM
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There is a plain steel maintenance door behind the second turbine, once past the doorway, and short corridor there is a set of sliding glass doors. Once inside of the command center their is the "deck", which is positioned in front of the screen. Located on deck are many work stations, computers. They don't only run the stimoceivers, but also carry out many other tasks. Powerful politicians and influential people own houses nearby the dam, some of them are located around Tiara Oaks golf course. I have 74.9492 mhz Am and 750khz AM emitting at all times from my head. Anyone with an NFR2K sweeper or sweeper with that sensitivity can detect my frequencies. The higher end bug sweepers pick up my signals. Went into the spy shop and various models picked up my frequencies. Please watch my videos, big boss jock my stimociever explained, and help me expose the stimoceiver program. Thank you reply to: Flyingclaydisk



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 04:07 PM
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The CIA ran command center, inside Shasta Dam was constructed in the forties. In those times it probably made sense to build it with such a large screen, and yes it can be easily seen when there working out on deck. Even by current day standards it is quite an impressive command center. Many operations have been directed, carried out using that facility. I am implanted with a stimoceiver, emitting 74.9492mhz AM, it's a gps locator, 750khz AM I can be listened to on a transistor radio which uses germanium diodes or on a crystal radio. a reply to: dogstar23



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 07:16 PM
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A thin layer of aluminum foil will block RFID signals.




posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 07:36 PM
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originally posted by: GodEmperor
A thin layer of aluminum foil will block RFID signals.



RFID doesn't transmit anything, so there's that.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

May want to check your source on that.



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: GodEmperor
a reply to: Bedlam

May want to check your source on that.


I can design you one. The implant literally does not emit a signal. See also: load reflection, quarter-wave backscatter.

The only RFID that actually emits signals by itself and not as an aspect of the interrogation signal is the sort with batteries in. And they don't last for long. Unless the OP is plugging himself in at night, no emissions.

eta: moreover, you're not going to have a lot of luck with either frequency he says he's emitting. The low frequency one would have an antenna that wouldn't fit in his body, and the high frequency one is in a band that's especially crappy for making it through meat. And the antenna for that one would be fairly long as well, if you want any efficiency at all.

Medical implants use h-field signalling, otherwise known as near field (although that's a misnomer). It's got no range. But it works well through meat. It's the sort of thing dog implants use. It doesn't "transmit" radio signals.

E-field RFID can't be implanted, because it uses a low power radio signal for interrogation. Radio doesn't work well from inside people to begin with. But in this case you have a worse issue, and that's the way e-field RFID works to return a signal. Backscatter modulation isn't going to do well when it's embedded in meat.

edit on 3-10-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 3 2016 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

A signal is a signal, whether it be 6 feet or 6 miles.


From your response, I should inform you of the non-serious nature of my comments.

Seriously though, it emits a signal, passive rfid have a range of under 6 feet.



posted on Oct, 4 2016 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: GodEmperor

Nuh-uh. The interrogator emits the signal. For h-field parts, the tag throws a load onto and off of the interrogator's drive coil.

For e-field parts, the tag changes its reflectance to the interrogator's drive signal.

But in neither case does a passive tag "transmit" a signal.

eta: passive e-field tags can be read from more than six feet but it depends on the tag design. You can't implant one though. An h-field tag is limited by the "lambda wall" as it can't return a load signal outside the near field. Other problems will rear their ugly heads long before that, though, h-field power density falls off as the sixth power of the distance.
edit on 4-10-2016 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2016 @ 04:23 AM
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a reply to: Bigbossjock

If they built command centres into obvious domestic first strike targets, they ought to seriously consider dropping the 'I' from their acronyms.

Only a complete fool would hide such things where they would be hit first in any serious conflict.



posted on Oct, 4 2016 @ 11:45 AM
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It's quite possible that when the command centers were designed in the 1930's they weren't planed around a first strike, nuclear war scenario. a reply to: MysterX




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