It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Help ATS via PayPal:
learn more

School's Natural Hair Ban Sparks National Debate

page: 2
15
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 12:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Bone75
What? Seriously?? Because of dyed hair? Unbelieveable.
(I believe you, it´s just so idiotic it´s not funny)
edit on 28-9-2016 by verschickter because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 12:53 PM
link   

originally posted by: johnb
Yeah same here my school didn't allow mohicans or the like and that was the 1980's and most schools were the same.

This is the same issue as being required to wear a school uniform as stated above it's about the schools image as a place of learning not a fashion show.



I agree. So why is it bad to ask black kids to keep their hair in a certain style/order? As I said, a long afro left to its own, with no 'taming' is to me an unkept style for kids, unless it is very short. In the same way white kids with extremely curly hair will have to put it into a pony tail at least or it will look messy and not neat. My friend has incredibly curly hair, the always had to have it pleated or in a ponytail for school.

A proper Afro is a very cool hairstyle but it is a style I'd expect an adult female to sport; and just like a mohecan it is not really a school girl style.

So why is it a problem to see the obvious for some black school girls and what does it have to do with being black?

You wear what's appropriate to school, black, white or asian or am I missing something here?



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 01:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic
Once again, I'm glad I don't have kids. This country doesn't treat them with any respect.


I'm tellin' ya - - - I'm trying to be very realistic about my (soon to be 9) grandson I raise.

I try to perceive his future adult world - - - and what specific "tools" he's gonna need.

He's right on the edge of the high functioning Autism Spectrum. Might even benefit him.

And then there's his hair. He's "hair sensitive" - - actually claims his hair hurts. He's got a thick mop and doesn't want anyone to touch it, let alone cut it or style it. Lot's of No Tangle spray, cuz I do insist it be brushed.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 01:21 PM
link   
This isn't new. Young boys are forced to shave or be expelled in any school within 200 miles of me. You can't get more natural than a beard. Same with hair....a boys hair cannot touch the top of a shirt collar in the back, or they have to leave until its within code.

Stupid as all hell....but the rules around here for as far back as anyone remembers.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 01:38 PM
link   
Hair codes like this have been around just about for ever.

The school districts I attended were all public, as my father retired from the Air Force before I started school, and all had the same standards for hair. Boys above the color.

Not that it would have mattered...I wore crew cuts (hated 'em...hated 'em) 'til junior high. It wasn't until high school that I wore my hair longer than that... ...and ever since, shoulder length or longer. It's rebelling against the strictures, however minor, of my childhood.

We hear, somewhat regularly, how kids should be allowed to be unique, be themselves... Uh-huh. Tell me another.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 01:53 PM
link   

originally posted by: Spider879
My youngest daughter went through kindergarten and high school in very conformist Japan without a problem came home with very good grades loved by all, she just had them cut because she wanted a new look after turning 18 but a "non conformist" school district in America have a problem??


On a slightly different level of this discussion, have you seen Chris Rock's documentary film "Good Hair"?

I was utterly aghast. And it is almost all African-American actresses and performers, the high profile one's who are doing this, and setting that example...and the sheer cost involved.



Although, the weave process, technically brilliant. Fascinating.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 02:05 PM
link   
That's just out of control. As long as your hair doesn't block the view of the person sitting behind you, I don't see the problem. Afro, cornrows, weave whatever. I don't care as long as it doesn't interfere with someone getting an education. My step daughters used to go to a private school. They had strict rules about no hair dyes, and length of hair for boys. etc.
That was fine. It's a private school. Public school? Whatever, as long it doesn't interfere with others they should just leave it alone.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 02:05 PM
link   
a reply to: Anaana

The sad thing about "good hair" is that it shows varying degrees of discrimination within a race that, itself, is well storied for being discriminated against.

In latin culture they have a 'brown paper bag test" type of deal, too. If you work out in the field, you get darker. So having lighter skin, especially among the older/more traditional people, is viewed as a vanity symbol or beauty symbol. My wife, thankfully, isn't in that traditional camp. She gets darkdarkdark during the summer. I wish it would stay year round, though.

But we all know that within racial groupings there is still no shortage of discrimination. In Western society, its been blond hair on top for the longest while now. For some unknown reason. Meanwhile, redheads get picked on. Despite that fact that the overwhelming majority of men view red hair as kryptonite. I think that has more to do with the role women play in our society as far as determining cultural beauty. Which, if true, makes the whole fat shaming thing more an issue of self loathing than anything else. We all have that little bit of it inside. Its why people who are gay but don't want to be tend to be the champions of hetero culture.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 02:19 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

The getting darker skinned thing is odd. It goes swings and roundabouts in terms of fashion and what is deemed the look of success I think. Perhaps, I'd see it as being more an aspirational competitive trait. It's like in Asia, you see the women in the fields, covered completely so that they will not colour in the sun, because dark skin is a sign that you work outdoors doing manual work. Here in the UK, where it is hard to get a tan, it used to be the sign of success to have a tan because it meant you could afford to go abroad which led to a whole industry devoted to making you look as though you are successful by faking it. It plays both to insecurities and aspirations I think.

Clearly there is a lucrative industry surrounding the "Good Hair" thing, those Dos cost a small fortune, and it pays to get celebrity clients, but the difficulty seems to be that it is tilting the representation of African-American women in the media which is a little bit more suggestive of discrimination against those who go natural because that isn't what the advertisers and sponsors want because natural hair doesn't cost nearly as much to maintain.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 02:24 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan


So having lighter skin, especially among the older/more traditional people, is viewed as a vanity symbol or beauty symbol. My wife, thankfully, isn't in that traditional camp. She gets darkdarkdark during the summer. I wish it would stay year round, though.


That´s exactly how it was in Europe not a century ago. Also with being skinny, it ment you had not enough to eat. In arabic countries, good proportioned women are a sign of wealth.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 02:30 PM
link   
a reply to: Anaana

I have 2 black nieces with "white" hair. Its wavy, but not really curly. They both count themselves as "lucky".

The oldest has been confused with eastern Indian on more than one occasion. We tell her its because she is beautiful on all continents. LOL, i think telling her that went to her head, though. She's a bit of a prima donna. Her younger sister is more of a "Hemmingway's sarcasm" kind of girl. So she works overtime trying to keep her big sis honest.

Nonetheless, it does afford her a higher level in her social order. Which puzzles me. Again, it comes across as self loathing. Which is a comment bound to piss someone off. But think about the back seat black women are forced to take when it comes to consideration of beauty in the US. Is it really an accurate representation of what people consider "beautiful"? To me, it doesn't seem to be. So enormous amounts of $$$ continue to be spent on hair.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 02:38 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I was just thinking about "Orange is the New Black"? The only character to have "Good Hair" in that was the lady who is transitioning (I'm not good with names).

I kind of feel that doesn't tip the balance in terms of fair representation so much as reinforce that "Good Hair" is "Good" and natural hair is "Bad".



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 03:01 PM
link   
a reply to: Anaana

and people say that adults don't bully.

LOL...its institutionalized in every way.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 05:02 PM
link   
This has been the norm in all schools in my area (Yorkshire) for a long time, years in fact. My daughter was sent home to change her multi coloured socks as unbeknown to me only white were allowed for girls and black for boys! She dyed her hair chestnut red and again was sent home and told to sort it out (almost impossible as it was freshly dyed) and boys are not allowed shaved heads or symbols patterns shaved into the hair. No make up jewellery short skirts trainers high heels no mobile phones....the dress code is often longer than the school day


Its all about discipline and "not standing out" or as my daughters' school put it when questioned "its not a fashion show"...I kinda agree with it to a point....if everyone is treated exactly the same and has to conform to the same code it means less competition between the rich kids who can afford the latest iphone and the poor kids who have nowt



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 05:06 PM
link   
a reply to: PhyllidaDavenport

Something interesting: the wording of the local ISD's dress code states taht hair cannot have "unnatural colors" applied.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 05:18 PM
link   
a reply to: verschickter

This makes me very uncomfortable. Communities need to ban together against the schools and oppose this.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 05:52 PM
link   
a reply to: DAVID64



From our lives beginning on

We are pushed in little forms

No one asks us how we like to be
In school they teach you what to think
But everyone says different things
But they're all convinced that
They're the ones to see
So they keep talking and they never stop
And at a certain point you give it up
So the only thing that's left to think is this
I want out




posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 07:02 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan




I think that has more to do with the role women play in our society as far as determining cultural beauty. Which, if true, makes the whole fat shaming thing more an issue of self loathing than anything else. We all have that little bit of it inside.

Yes this was made a political issue in the last debate when Hillary brought up Donald's fat shaming his first Miss Universe, allegedly calling her miss piggy and Miss House keeper because she is Hispanic and she gained some pounds after her crowning.
But yeah self loathing is a thing not unique to anyone group of ppl, before the Bootimious Maximus was not a thing in Euro-American aesthetics especially for those with connections north of the Med, but anywhere south of that was in, in Africa right across the continent they have what's called fattening houses, a kind of finishing school for girls about to be married, most AAs and Latin men I include Italians and Greek , to this day is all about the bootimious Maximus , with the advent of pop culture it spread itself among others to the point of injections with silicone and other surgeries , add to this lip injection with butt fat..making cosmetic surgeons a lot of $$ feasting off ppl's insecurities.
edit on 28-9-2016 by Spider879 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 07:14 PM
link   
a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

All of it is stupid. As long as a kid isn't hurting themselves or others with their appearance leave them alone. Otherwise you're telling them how they look is more important than their education.



posted on Sep, 28 2016 @ 07:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: Hecate666
I would be quite annoyed if there were no restrictions on white kids. But they can't just have any hairstyle and also must conform by having a 'sanctioned' style. Every week there is a 'sad' looking estate mum whose kid can't have a mohecan or a hipster style, others are about girls who can't dye their hair an 'outrageous' colour, not even Henna.
Is it the same in America? Or are white kids allowed to do what they want with their hair?
I'm seriously asking.
To me a 'natural' Afro if just loose may be a non fitting style. Unless it is short.


No. White kids can't do whatever with their hair.

At least at the school we send our son too, there are rules about what can and can't be done with hair. Boys must maintain a conservative cut that cannot get too long.

We knew that when we signed him up, so he gets his trimmed regularly.

A uniform school can set all kinds of codes. It seems odd to curtail natural hair, but maybe they want the length kept down.




top topics



 
15
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join