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Towards quantum Internet: Researchers teleport particle of light six kilometres

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posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 12:47 PM
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According to The Libertarian Public, scientists at the University of Calgary succeeded in transporting a particle close to four miles away from its original location. While this may not mean we’ll be teleporting to different planets with the push of a button anytime soon, it does mean that the way we use technology could drastically change very soon. To better explain why this finding is such a major this, Dr. Wolfgang Tittel from the University of Calgary explained via a press statement:




“Being entangled means that the two photons that form an entangled pair have properties that are linked regardless of how far the two are separated. When one of the photons was sent over to City Hall, it remained entangled with the photon that stayed at the University of Calgary. What happened is the instantaneous and disembodied transfer of the photon’s quantum state onto the remaining photon of the entangled pair, which is the one that remained six kilometres away at the university.”


So apparently they were able to transport particle(s) nearly 4 miles away from it's original location. Mind blown right now.
At the rate technology is advancing, I can't wait to see where will be 50 years from (if I live that much longer)



City's accessible dark fibre makes research possible The research could not be possible without access to the proper technology. One of the critical pieces of infrastructure that support quantum networking is accessible dark fibre. Dark fibre, so named because of its composition—a single optical cable with no electronics or network equipment on the alignment—doesn't interfere with quantum technology. Read more at: phys.org...


What are your thoughts ATS? Which way do you see technology heading?

Source[/ur l]

[url=http://screenrant.com/star-trek-teleportation-science-particle/]source




posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 12:56 PM
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a reply to: slapjacks

Ultimately this makes no sense to me. Quantum entanglement seems very "magical", and I know its solid science, but in my tiny brain, this violates the speed of light. If you have information travel (or appear, whatever) instantanious, then..no...how can that happen and not simply trash the entire concept of relativity.

Some tried to explain, but the explanation sounds equally insane (something about it isn't usable information until..the time passes..or something...hell of I know)

My question is simple..can this tech, developed, allow for lag free communication with someone on mars, or alpha centuri..because that is a game changer for soo many things, but especially for distance space exploration...being able to contact and navagate probes on europa or something second by second, etc...



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 01:19 PM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX
a reply to: slapjacks

Ultimately this makes no sense to me. Quantum entanglement seems very "magical", and I know its solid science, but in my tiny brain, this violates the speed of light. If you have information travel (or appear, whatever) instantanious, then..no...how can that happen and not simply trash the entire concept of relativity.

Some tried to explain, but the explanation sounds equally insane (something about it isn't usable information until..the time passes..or something...hell of I know)

My question is simple..can this tech, developed, allow for lag free communication with someone on mars, or alpha centuri..because that is a game changer for soo many things, but especially for distance space exploration...being able to contact and navagate probes on europa or something second by second, etc...


Yes. The only challenge is in moving the particles to their destination in the first place. Once done, you can communicate instantly from any point in the universe to any other instantaneously.



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 01:20 PM
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originally posted by: nightbringr

originally posted by: SaturnFX
a reply to: slapjacks

Ultimately this makes no sense to me. Quantum entanglement seems very "magical", and I know its solid science, but in my tiny brain, this violates the speed of light. If you have information travel (or appear, whatever) instantanious, then..no...how can that happen and not simply trash the entire concept of relativity.

Some tried to explain, but the explanation sounds equally insane (something about it isn't usable information until..the time passes..or something...hell of I know)

My question is simple..can this tech, developed, allow for lag free communication with someone on mars, or alpha centuri..because that is a game changer for soo many things, but especially for distance space exploration...being able to contact and navagate probes on europa or something second by second, etc...


Yes. The only challenge is in moving one mated set of the particles to their destination in the first place. Once done, you can communicate instantly from any point in the universe to any other instantaneously.



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 01:27 PM
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I love the idea of transporting photons and eventually information. Does anybody know if they actually can confirm that it was the very same photon that was redirected to the final position? How do they know it was and not just a destroy and create simultaneously in two places? Sorry if these seem like basic questions but I am trying to wrap my head around how they could tell that it was that exact photon and not some randomly conjured photon that arrived at the endpoint.
I can comprehend most science but quantum entanglement and related studies are things I have not put much energy into.



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: evc1shop
I love the idea of transporting photons and eventually information. Does anybody know if they actually can confirm that it was the very same photon that was redirected to the final position? How do they know it was and not just a destroy and create simultaneously in two places? Sorry if these seem like basic questions but I am trying to wrap my head around how they could tell that it was that exact photon and not some randomly conjured photon that arrived at the endpoint.
I can comprehend most science but quantum entanglement and related studies are things I have not put much energy into.


No, it is a sort of linked (twin) photon is how that worked, not the same one.

This science is very strange.

Basically, you have a brother/sister photon, one spins left, the other spins right. lets say you make the one that was spinning left start spinning right, the other one will start then spinning left when you do it because they are paired up (think yin/yang symbol).

So, the funky thing is, you can be on opposite sides of the world / galaxy / universe and same thing..you spin one a certain way, the other instantaniously counters it regardless of space between them.
edit on 27-9-2016 by SaturnFX because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: SaturnFX
Thanks for a simple, effective answer. From what you said, I am able to understand that the concept is of a pairing and affecting one affects the other. Perfect!


That leaves me with one more question, maybe you can answer, maybe someone else. How do you know where the other end of a pair is or how do you link them up? There must be a way that the scientists knew where to look for the affected photon. Do you know?



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: evc1shop
a reply to: SaturnFX
Thanks for a simple, effective answer. From what you said, I am able to understand that the concept is of a pairing and affecting one affects the other. Perfect!


That leaves me with one more question, maybe you can answer, maybe someone else. How do you know where the other end of a pair is or how do you link them up? There must be a way that the scientists knew where to look for the affected photon. Do you know?


You take a photon, you then rip it apart via laser and lenses, all very clever, and anyhow, you are left with 2 photons half the size of the original. voila, they are entangled because they are basically the left and right arm.

You can then capture these half protons and do useful things with them, like put em 6 miles apart and see if they change, or shoot them at friends, maybe catch ghosts? (or is that protons...sound the same)

Anyhow, hopefully that answers your questions...I think they are probably held together with glue or staples or something, I dont know.



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: slapjacks

Could criminals one day utilize this power to teleport inside of banks vaults, etc.? What happens when physical barriers are no longer in place to prevent such things.. wow. Crazy to think about!



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: FamCore

No, unfortunately it doesn't mean humans can or ever will be ever able to teleport.

It isn't the kind of teleporting they use on Star Trek, in fact they shouldn't really use the term teleport for this kind of technology, it's misleading.



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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a reply to: slapjacks


So apparently they were able to transport particle(s) nearly 4 miles away from it's original location. Mind blown right now.

Photons aren't rightly defined as particles, they have no mass, don't behave as ordinary elementary particles, are dual natured (particle and wave), blah blah.

Nothing in the form of solid matter was transmitted over four miles away.
edit on 27-9-2016 by intrptr because: bb code



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 02:45 PM
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a reply to: Nexttimemaybe


It isn't the kind of teleporting they use on Star Trek, in fact they shouldn't really use the term teleport for this kind of technology, it's misleading.

But, but, Television images of people are televised across great distances... why not real people?



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 03:09 PM
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a reply to: slapjacks

According to THIS ARTICLE, quantum entanglement is one of the reasons that we may be living in a simulated universe. With our puny brains, it is difficult to imagine another reason for this freakish behavior.

One of my favorite Simulated Reality Theorists is Thomas Campbell: My Big Toe (Theory of Everything)



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: slapjacks


It depends on how you look at the photon , as it exists out of our linear time, It also has no distance or speed coeficient.We think it has, but it cant,if its time locked. The photon at the speed of light, is our observation,it cant have speed ,it cant do distance, because its in some other infinite state.



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 03:39 PM
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a reply to: slapjacks

The communication aspect is great news but the real news was this...


Using laser light, they have developed a precise, continuous control technology giving 60 times more success than previous efforts in sustaining the lifetime of "qubits," the unit that quantum computers encode. In particular, the researchers have shown that they can continue to create a quantum behavior known as the entangled state—entangling more than one million different physical systems, a world record that was only limited in their investigation by data storage space.

Phys.org, Sept 27, 2016 - Quantum computing advances with control of entanglement.

That is what has kept quantum computing back is the length of time they are able to cohere a system (photons, bosons, ions, light, whatever the science team is working with) at an entangled state. This is huge news!! There are error correcting codes out there but usually they involve other q-bits to help error correction (the MIT 5 qubit machine uses 12 qubits with 5 usable and 7 for error correction). The problem with the above article is does not say exactly how long and if they are using superfluid gas (grrrrr!)

There is another article on Phys.org saying they have slowed light down and stopped it (which also has a significant impact on quantum computing).

It looks like one day, we will wake up and the future will have happened! And there is not much that can be done about it but make the entire world switch over to quantum encrypted devices (at least the banks and the internet) because once you can buy a computer RSA is over and dead. Quantum Key Encryption will have to happen.



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: SaturnFX

Thanks again. That makes sense, actually.






posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: Nexttimemaybe
a reply to: FamCore

No, unfortunately it doesn't mean humans can or ever will be ever able to teleport.

It isn't the kind of teleporting they use on Star Trek, in fact they shouldn't really use the term teleport for this kind of technology, it's misleading.


This in spades.
edit on 27-9-2016 by audubon because: typo



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 04:29 PM
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How long until MATTER is used?



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 04:35 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: slapjacks


So apparently they were able to transport particle(s) nearly 4 miles away from it's original location. Mind blown right now.

Photons aren't rightly defined as particles, they have no mass, don't behave as ordinary elementary particles, are dual natured (particle and wave), blah blah.

Nothing in the form of solid matter was transmitted over four miles away.
Actually not even a photon was teleported.

This is a quote from the article and it's just plain WRONG!

a group of physicists led by Wolfgang Tittel, professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Calgary have successfully demonstrated teleportation of a photon (an elementary particle of light) over a straight-line distance of six kilometres using The City of Calgary's fibre optic cable infrastructure.
That's written by the blog author who doesn't know what he's talking about making the title of his blog and of this thread a hoax.

The research done by Wolfgang Tittel is not a hoax but you'll notice there's no quote of him saying a photon was teleported because it didn't happen. You can ask Wolfgang Tittel what happened and he'll tell you it's not the particle that was teleported but merely they made a correlation of the quantum state of two entangled photons separated by that distance, which is an interesting enough phenomenon without the blog author having to lie about what is happening.


originally posted by: Nexttimemaybe
It isn't the kind of teleporting they use on Star Trek, in fact they shouldn't really use the term teleport for this kind of technology, it's misleading.
I think calling the blog author misleading is too generous, he's just wrong.

edit on 2016927 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Sep, 27 2016 @ 05:18 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: slapjacks


So apparently they were able to transport particle(s) nearly 4 miles away from it's original location. Mind blown right now.

Photons aren't rightly defined as particles, they have no mass, don't behave as ordinary elementary particles, are dual natured (particle and wave), blah blah.

Nothing in the form of solid matter was transmitted over four miles away.
Actually not even a photon was teleported.

This is a quote from the article and it's just plain WRONG!

a group of physicists led by Wolfgang Tittel, professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Calgary have successfully demonstrated teleportation of a photon (an elementary particle of light) over a straight-line distance of six kilometres using The City of Calgary's fibre optic cable infrastructure.
That's written by the blog author who doesn't know what he's talking about making the title of his blog and of this thread a hoax.

The research done by Wolfgang Tittel is not a hoax but you'll notice there's no quote of him saying a photon was teleported because it didn't happen. You can ask Wolfgang Tittel what happened and he'll tell you it's not the particle that was teleported but merely they made a correlation of the quantum state of two entangled photons separated by that distance, which is an interesting enough phenomenon without the blog author having to lie about what is happening.


originally posted by: Nexttimemaybe
It isn't the kind of teleporting they use on Star Trek, in fact they shouldn't really use the term teleport for this kind of technology, it's misleading.
I think calling the blog author misleading is too generous, he's just wrong.



Yea should have been that they " teleported information" not they teleported a proton.


Imagaine space exploration with realtime video and controls?!?!



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