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Tumeric is now official it repairs a key gene.

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posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 12:01 AM
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a reply to: Agartha


My main concerns about milk, stems from an article that originated a few years back,that compared Japan before and after the second world war, and the ensuing Americanisation, or Westernising that occured. But its no coincidence, that the mesturation age of girls dropped from sixteen to twelve. The Milk in those days was probably as benign as it got for oestrogen and the IGF growth hormone. These have gone up in the sixty years that have passed, exponentially.The Dairy has also increased to fifty per cent of the diet. The ideal amount of animal protein in the human diet is about ten per cent.Since milk is essentialy liquid meat,with a fat added,plus high hormone levels and a human growth hormone . The present over consumption, to my mind is very dicey. No wants to hear this as its like the "Emperor having no clothes " People like the status quo even if its slowly killing them , because its more comfortable than actually changing things. If you could say that the Nazis removing all the Cows and pigs from Denmark during the second world War , and the ensuing rise in health of the population was a trial, then when they were repatriated after the Peace, with a subsequent decline in health was valid.One would conclude that in all reasonableness their was cause for concern.




posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 02:35 AM
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originally posted by: anonentity
If you could say that the Nazis removing all the Cows and pigs from Denmark during the second world War , and the ensuing rise in health of the population was a trial, then when they were repatriated after the Peace, with a subsequent decline in health was valid.One would conclude that in all reasonableness their was cause for concern.


Can you please add a citation for your above statement, because I've never heard of that and I would like to read about it.
Thanks.



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: Agartha
That may be true, I haven't seen how many studies there are, but what people not in a scientific or medical profession don't understand is that only clinical trials are definitive evidence of Turmeric working (or not). And that is what we lack: clinical trials (with live humans, not mice, not cells in a petri dish).


There is no lack of clinical trials. In fact, it's about to the point of meta-studies.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...
AAPS J. 2013 Jan; 15(1): 195–218.
Published online 2012 Nov 10. doi: 10.1208/s12248-012-9432-8
PMCID: PMC3535097
Therapeutic Roles of Curcumin: Lessons Learned from Clinical Trials
Subash C. Gupta, Sridevi Patchva, and Bharat B. Aggarwal

Which has a wonderful quote:

Extensive research over the past half century has shown that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a component of the golden spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), can modulate multiple cell signaling pathways. Extensive clinical trials over the past quarter century have addressed the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of this nutraceutical against numerous diseases in humans.


Can't tell if this is paywalled, but Table 1 from the article has a list of clinical trials: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

[Edit: Also note the date of that paper. There's been a few since then.]

edit on 30-9-2016 by CyberGarp because: Addendum



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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Yea tumeric fixes a lot of different things from various cancers, depression, alcoholism, and other things. A huge amount of studies on them. I used to have it bookmarked, but the page has disappeared. Should be something added to every meal along with black pepper so the body can absorb it. I tried to inform my aunt about it; she had cancer. I pointed out the peer-reviewed papers to her. She told me the doctor said these are just studies on rats herp a derp. Like where else do most studies begin on... Month later she died. I'm glad I don't know who that doctor is. I'd xyzabc123....



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 03:05 PM
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The title of this thread is a misnomer, "Tumeric is now official it repairs a key gene." The referenced study looked at methylation and found that Turmeric de-methylated several genes. There is no "key" or "repair" of damage. Methylation is a gene expression suppressor, which your body naturally uses to control expression. So, the title should read "Turmeric is now official it turns some repressed genes back on", or simpler, "Science found that turmeric turns some genes on".

The consequences or interpretation of this fact upon one's health is really unknown. It is surprising however that a food could affect gene regulation. The number of pathways in the body targeted by Turmeric is impressive. Usually with so many cross targets the toxicity would be expected to be high. Think about a very complex network of control feedbacks (like 200,000 species of proteins in a combinatorial dance of chemistry), and then something randomly twists a large number of dials--the results are usually not desirable. Turmeric is surprising in that it has low toxicity, has proven clinical benefits, and it targets a huge number of regulation targets--to the point it modifies the body's own fundamental control system. It is a very rare compounds to have such effects.

In short, I can endorse curry as one of my favorite foods and it's good for you.



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Agartha


nutritionstudies.org... Theirs quite a few around, could it be concluded that this is represents a trial?



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: Agartha


nutritionstudies.org... Theirs quite a few around, could it be concluded that this is represents a trial? and heres an interestin one on Japan health101.org...


edit on 30-9-2016 by anonentity because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: lostgirl

Hi! I got my 71 year old father to take it (finally) after he got the second skin cancer place removed from the top of his head (and that was after several spots removed on his arms). He also had a kidney transplant several years ago and had a full bypass (quad) about 10 years ago. He's diabetic too. All that being said, he is super active and looks super healthy - not a day over 60-ish really.

I've been telling him about Turmeric (actually curcumin with piperine - the active ingredients) for over a year. He finally checked with his transplant doctor at his six-month checkup and he was all for it. He took his bottle with him and it was the Doctor's Best brand. Doctor's Best Brand

If cost is a big factor, this Vitacost brand looks very similar in dosage and does have piperine / bioperine too: Vitacost Version

As I mentioned in my other posts, Dad (and I) will continue with our regular doctor's appointments etc. but as his doctor agreed, the Turmeric can't hurt. And I can personally vouch for the fact that it has eased my arthritis pain A LOT, it enabled my husband to come off his BP medicine, and is the only likely factor in making a suspicious / pre-cancerous spot on the hubby's arm disappear.

Good luck!


edit on 30-9-2016 by nicevillegrl because: added info

edit on 30-9-2016 by nicevillegrl because: spelling



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: CyberGarp


That bit about it dropping the morning reading of the blood sugar should interest a lot of type 2 diabetics, that was virtually a drop back to normal.



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 08:25 PM
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a reply to: nicevillegrl

Thanks so much for the info!!!

Can I ask how much per day (milligrams) and how often?

Thank you!



posted on Sep, 30 2016 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: CyberGarp


Well if methylation stops a Gene from working,its much the same as a bad sparkplug stopping a car from working, once the problem is attended to, it works and its a repair.The inhibitor becomes one of the sums of its parts. Semantics true but valid.



posted on Oct, 1 2016 @ 10:28 AM
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originally posted by: anonentity
a reply to: CyberGarp


Well if methylation stops a Gene from working,its much the same as a bad sparkplug stopping a car from working, once the problem is attended to, it works and its a repair.The inhibitor becomes one of the sums of its parts. Semantics true but valid.



That's a poor analogy, it's not a "bad" anything nor is a "repair"--it's working exactly as it always has for millions of years. Here's a better ELI5: You're born with a huge library of possible operating programs. You then adapt to your environment in early development, and your body puts all those other possible programs into deep storage (methylation). Then your environment changes, it doesn't go back to deep storage to look up a new program and you're not quite adapted to the current environment. Demethylation goes and takes a bunch of programs from deep storage and brings them out for reconsideration. That's not a repair, it's reconsidering how you're operating.

So in a car analogy, say you live in Mexico, and never have to worry about snow or cold. You have urgent business that requires a drive up to Canada in the winter. You can make the trip, but it will runs a high risk of breaking down or wrecking due to the cold and snow. You need snow tires, proper coolant and possibly some sand bags for traction. You have all these things, but they're in your uncles storage shed in North Carolina--too bad you can't divert that far to pick them up. You make a phone call and surprise, your uncle now runs "turmeric international delivery service", and you're going to have a far more comfortable trip.

A lot of the challenges of aging involve processes going awry, entropy winning out and things breaking down. One could conjecture that a change of program might just help out.



posted on Oct, 1 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: CyberGarp

a reply to: anonentity


Thank you both for your replies and links. I lack time right now but I'll be back tomorrow and reply properly.




posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 09:33 AM
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a reply to: CyberGarp

Very interesting article! I enjoyed reading it. The safety and tolerability of curcumin at high doses has been well established with this review ( Only one study was suspended due to treatment toxicity in 5 patients and sudden death of one). However, its efficacy is not yet confirmed. To stay on topic let’s analyse the clinical trials on cancer only (I have to be clear that I only read the trials on the link you provided, as it takes too long to read them all. If some have been followed by subsequent studies I have not read them and if you have please feel free to link).We should also note that curcumin was always taken with another drug (different ones in each trial).

Colorectal cancer: this 2004 study had a very small sample (15 people) and it showed a reduction of PGE2 which may indicate biological activity; a specific dose of curcumin was recommended for phase II, however we don’t know if this has been done. This 2005 study showed a small reduction of M1G adduct levels in malignant tissue and no difference in Cox2 protein levels, which indicates there is some pharmacological effect but further studies are needed. This 2006 study showed that curcumin reduced the number and size of polyps, however, the sample size was incredibly small: only 5 patients.

Pancreatic cancer: this study showed that curcumin may be able to reverse peroxidation but studies are not conclusive and sample was very small. This was a phase II trial which is inconclusive too as it showed some activity with some patients and for a brief period of time (with a very small sample again).

Breast cancer: this study showed some biological response in most patients and phase II has started to compare these results and docetaxel alone, as it was given with the curcumin and they need to find out which regime is the one showing results.

Prostate cancer: this is a good one with a good sample (85 participants) and it showed significant decrease of prostate antigen; however, curcumin was not given by itself but as a combination with soy isoflavones.

I won’t continue with all the articles cited as they are too many, but we can see a clear pattern emerging. What we have seen so far is that all trials had very small sample and that curcumin was given in combination with different drugs.

This means I am going to repeat what I’ve been saying: curcumin seems to have potential, but more clinical trials are needed with bigger samples to confirm the results we have seen so far.




posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: Agartha

Just looking through the benefits, it appears that the a lot of the effect has something to do with inflammatory pathways. This makes sense in the that there would be some benefit for cancer patients as it's well known that inflammation is a major player in the process. The benefits in the cancer realm showed evidence of slowing progression, but be aware these were injected high doses. At lower doses, it is incredibly safe.



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: anonentity
nutritionstudies.org... Theirs quite a few around, could it be concluded that this is represents a trial?


Not really: a clinical trial needs, among other things, a controlled environment/sample etc, which is obviously not the case with what happened in Norway. And what happened in Norway is not as simple as 'people stopped eating meat and drinking milk'. Your link said:


The Germans removed all animal livestock. The native population subsisted on whole grains, legumes, vegetables and fruit.


Whilst it's true pigs and cows were taken by the Germans, it's not true people only eat a vegetarian diet. Fish consumption increased greatly and it was even dried and grated into flour. People also started eating birds, including seagulls (LINK).

Another reason cardiovascular diseases dropped was the fact that tobacco and alcohol were not accessible (LINK). Sugar became rare.

But the saddest reason was that there was a high increase of 'deficiency related diseases' because people were starving and not eating properly. Of course that mortality from circulatory diseases dropped, when almost 11,000 Norwegians died as a result of rationing and war.

I just want to add that I actually believe we eat too much meat and in my household we eat vegetarian two or three days a week. However, we cannot blame it all on meat and milk, when too much sugar and a sedentary lifestyle are probably the culprit for heart disease.








edit on 2-10-2016 by Agartha because: SPAG...



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: CyberGarp

Just looking through the benefits, it appears that the a lot of the effect has something to do with inflammatory pathways. This makes sense in the that there would be some benefit for cancer patients as it's well known that inflammation is a major player in the process. The benefits in the cancer realm showed evidence of slowing progression, but be aware these were injected high doses. At lower doses, it is incredibly safe.


Absolutely! The inflammatory process is affected by curcumin, this is why I think the trial with soy isoflavones was the most successful one (soy isoflavones are anti-inflammatory compounds). I also agree curcumin is safe and it does not seem to present side effects, which is a bonus. Hopefully in the next decade or so we'll know more.

And I second what you said on an earlier post: let's eat more curry, it's delicious and it seems to do some good .




posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 11:32 AM
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a reply to: anonentity

The results make me question the role of turmeric in that study. If turmeric was really responsible for those genetic changes, the supplement group should have also seen the same changes.

We know that people on a plant based diet also see genetic repairing taking place. For example, eating a whole food plant based diet has been proven to repair and lengthen telomeres.

If you tell people to add turmeric to their diet, I suspect this is going to fundamentally change the type of foods they eat. What kinds of dishes go good with turmeric? Indian cuisine of course. Indian cuisine is largely vegetarian. In fact, they only eat 5 kg of meat annually per person in India - a tiny fraction of what American's eat.

So perhaps these changes are not related to turmeric, but rather to a diet that tastes good with turmeric.



edit on 10/17/2016 by AnarchoCapitalist because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: AnarchoCapitalist


You do have a very valid point, but in this study they just continued with their eating habits as normal.But you are right all the research is done, I know rats fed on 20% milk casein showed liver damage , when it was dropped to 5% it repaired.Same with all the type 2 diabetes studies when plant based diets were introduced the damage reversed, along with all Cardiovascular symptoms.But most people would rather, have a burger and die young.



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